Tag Archives: Altitude

Festivalul Cetelor de Feciori Fagaras 2015


Festivalul Cetelor de Feciori Fagaras 2015

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Gene from Extinct Humans Helps Tibetans Breathe Easy


Gene from Extinct Humans Helps Tibetans Breathe Easy

The genetic adaptation that allows Tibetans to survive and live comfortably at altitudes that would make most other humans on Earth terribly sick came from an extinct species of human. The variant of the EPAS-1 gene carried by nearly 90 percent of Tibetans closely matches that of the extinct Denisovan people. This gene is involved in regulating hemoglobin production and helps the body produce enough red blood cells to cope with low oxygen levels but not so many as to dangerously thicken the blood. The findings suggest that at some point in the history of the Tibetan people, their ancestors mated with Denisovans, thereby acquiring this adaptation. More… Discuss

NEWS: TEST DEVELOPED TO PREDICT ALTITUDE SICKNESS VULNERABILITY


Test Developed to Predict Altitude Sickness Vulnerability

Most people who ascend to altitudes above 8,000 ft (2,400 m) gradually adapt to the reduced oxygen concentration and low atmospheric pressure, but some have a severe reaction that can be fatal unless they return to low altitude. Until now, there was no way of determining who would be vulnerable to altitude sickness, but researchers have developed a new test that seems to identify such individuals. At the moment, the test can only be administered after a person has spent at least four hours at high altitude, but the research team hopes to reduce this in the future. More… Discuss

 

HIGH-ALTITUDE PILOTS SUBJECT TO BRAIN LESIONS


High-Altitude Pilots Subject to Brain Lesions

Decompression sickness, or “the bends,” is typically seen in scuba divers, but high-altitude pilots, who regularly fly at 64,000 feet and higher in planes that maintain a lower cabin pressure than typical commercial flights, are also at risk. Even those that escape decompression sickness are not unaffected by the repeated and prolonged exposure to a low-pressure environment. Researchers have found that high-altitude pilots have a higher incidence of brain lesions calledwhite matter hyperintensities than other military personnel. The pilots show no discernible cognitive impairments, but further study is needed to ascertain whether these lesions are harmful. More… Discuss