Tag Archives: ancient rome

today’s holiday: Lemuralia


Lemuralia

In ancient Rome, the lemures—the ghosts of the family’s dead—were considered to be troublesome and therefore had to be exorcized on a regular basis. The Lemuralia or Lemuria was a yearly festival held on the 9th, 11th, and 13th of May to get rid of the lemures. Participants walked barefoot, cleansed their hands three times, and threw black beans behind them nine times to appease the spirits of the dead. On the third day of the festival, a merchants’ festival was held to ensure a prosperous year for business. More… Discuss

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Saint of the Day for Saturday, February 14th, 2015 :St. Valentine


Image of St. Valentine

St. Valentine

Click Here for St. Valentine Prayer’s Valentine was a holy priest in Rome, who, with St. Marius and his family, assisted the martyrs in the persecution under Claudius II. He was apprehended, and … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

St. Dacius: Feastday: January 14


St. Dacius

Image of St. Dacius

Facts

Feastday: January 14

Death: 552

Bishop of Milan, Italy, probably from 530, exiled by the Arian Ostrogoths. When Milan was attacked by the Goths, General Belisarius of Constantinople, failed to aid the city. It is believed that Datius was taken prisoner for a time but was freed by his friend Cassiodorus. He went to Constantinople to support Pope Vigilius against Emperor Justinian in the Three Chapter Controversy of 545 . He probably died there.

today’s holiday: Gynaecocratia (2015)


Gynaecocratia (2015)

The Greek title of this observance is a word that means female rule or government. This attempt at feminist revolt is of long tradition in northern Greece, where it is common for women to do all the household work and for most men to take life easy in cafes. Today, in the villages of Komotini, Xanthi, Kilkis, and Serres, that standard is reversed for a day when Gynaecocratia is celebrated. The women gather in village cafes to socialize, while the men stay at home cleaning house, tending the babies, and generally looking after household tasks. At dusk, the men join their wives in celebrations. More… Discuss

Beethoven: Sinfonía Nº3 “Heróica” – 4º mov. Finale


According to Beethoven’s pupil and assistant, Ferdinand Ries, when Napoleon proclaimed himself Emperor of the French in May 1804, Beethoven became disgusted and went to the table where the completed score lay. He took hold of the title-page and tore it up in rage. This is the account of the scene as told by Ries:

In writing this symphony Beethoven had been thinking of Buonaparte, but Buonaparte while he was First Consul. At that time Beethoven had the highest esteem for him and compared him to the greatest consuls of ancient Rome. Not only I, but many of Beethoven’s closer friends, saw this symphony on his table, beautifully copied in manuscript, with the word “Buonaparte” inscribed at the very top of the title-page and “Ludwig van Beethoven” at the very bottom. …I was the first to tell him the news that Buonaparte had declared himself Emperor, whereupon he broke into a rage and exclaimed, “So he is no more than a common mortal! Now, too, he will tread under foot all the rights of man, indulge only his ambition; now he will think himself superior to all men, become a tyrant!” Beethoven went to the table, seized the top of the title-page, tore it in half and threw it on the floor. The page had to be re-copied and it was only now that the symphony received the title “Sinfonia eroica.”