Tag Archives: Arkansas

this day in the yesteryear: Zoot Suit Riots Come to an End (1943)


Zoot Suit Riots Come to an End (1943)

Named for the style of clothing favored by the mainly Mexican-American victims of these clashes, the Zoot Suit Riots erupted between American servicemen stationed in Los Angeles, California, during World War II and the city’s minority residents. While the local press lauded the attacks by the servicemen and described them as having a “cleansing effect,” First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt denounced them as “race riots” rooted in discrimination. What happened to the nine sailors arrested in the riots? More… Discuss

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This Day in the Yesteryear: The Louisiana Purchase (1803)


This Day in the Yesteryear

The Louisiana Purchase (1803)

Early American settlers in the western territories depended on the Mississippi River‘s port of New Orleans for commerce. When Spain retroceded New Orleans to France in 1800, Americans feared their access to the river would be blocked, so President Thomas Jefferson sent negotiators to broker a deal for the port city. Why did Napoleon ultimately sell the entire Louisiana territory, including New Orleans, to the US for only about 4 cents per acre, or a sum total of $15 million? More… Discuss

CIA Director admits to some use of brutal tactics in rare televised news conference — CBS Evening News


The Crater of Diamonds


The Crater of Diamonds

Situated over an eroded volcanic pipe in Arkansas, Crater of Diamonds State Park is the world’s only diamond-bearing site open to the public. The park features a 37-acre plowed field where visitors can prospect for diamonds and other gemstones. Moreover, they may keep whatever they find regardless of value. Since the area became a state park in 1972, visitors have taken home more than 25,000 diamonds. In 1924, the largest diamond ever unearthed in the US was found there. How many carats was it? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Juneteenth


Juneteenth

Although President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, it wasn’t until two years later that the word reached the slaves in Texas. General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston on June 19, 1865 with the intention of forcing slave owners to release their slaves, and the day has been celebrated since that time in Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, and other parts of the Deep South under the nickname “Juneteenth.” Observed primarily in African-American communities, Juneteenth festivities usually include parades, picnics, and baseball games. More… Discuss


Daisy Lee Gatson Bates (1914)

Bates was a key figure in the integration of public schools in Little Rock, Arkansas. The publisher of a newspaper, Bates began publicizing civil rights issues in the early 1940s. In 1957, when the Little Rock School Board chose nine black students to integrate the local high school, Bates organized the group’s activities amid mob violence so intense that the students could only enter the school under military guard. On what national holiday is Daisy Gatson Bates Day observed in ArkansasMore…Discuss