Tag Archives: arthur rubinstein

Historic Musical bits: Arthur Rubinstein – Brahms Intermezzo, Op. 118, great compositions/performancesNo. 2 in A major


Arthur Rubinstein – Brahms Intermezzo, Op. 118, No. 2 in A major

Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin Bolero, Op 19 ,great compositions/performances


Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin Bolero, Op 19

Felix Mendelssohn – Octet in E-flat major, Op. 20, (1964) : great compositions/performances


Alicia de Larrocha plays ENRIQUE GRANADOS – Danzas Españolas: make music par of your life series


ENRIQUE GRANADOS.- Danzas Españolas

Daniil Trifonov, Zubin Mehta – Rachmaninov, Rhapsody on a theme by Paganini: great compositions/performances


Daniil Trifonov, Zubin Mehta – Rachmaninov, Rhapsody on a theme by Paganini

Brahms Rhapsody Op 119 No 4 in E Flat Major Rubinstein Rec 1941: great compositions/performances


Brahms Rhapsody Op 119 No 4 in E Flat Major Rubinstein Rec 1941

Frédéric Chopin – 24 Études Op. 10 & Op. 25 and 3 Nouvelles Études | Claudio Arrau, piano: make music part of your life series


Frédéric Chopin – 24 Études Op. 10 & Op. 25 and 3 Nouvelles Études | Claudio Arrau, piano

Frédéric Chopin – 12 Études Opp. 10 & 25. 3 Nouvelles Études. (Claudio Arrau, “The Philosopher of the Piano”, 1956) (2007 Digital Remastering)
Recorded: 15-22 & 29.VI. and 5.IX.1956, No.3, Abbey Road Studios, London. First issued in 1957 by Columbia Ltd. Mono/ADD
“Great Recordings of the 20th Century”. EMI Icons, EMI Classics, 2011 & Warner Classics, 2013.

I. Book No.1: 12 Etudes for Piano Op.10, 1830-32.
Before Chopin, there was a tradition of writing studies for the development of keyboard technique, but the pieces were primarily didactic. This set of 12 Études, dedicated to Liszt, represents a new form: concert pieces that serve a secondary function as development of advanced piano skills. Each étude begins with a pattern of pianistic figuration, which creates the specific technical problem for the étude and persists for the duration of the piece. That Chopin was able to create poetry in spite of such controlled and limited means of expression is a testament to his creative genius. The twelve Études published as Chopin’s Opus 10 are an indispensable tool of the modern pianist’s craft: they are a rite of passage that no serious pianist can ignore.
00:00 Nº 1 in C major. Allegro
01:59 Nº 2 in A minor. Allegro
03:23 Nº 3 in E major. Lento ma non troppo (Tritesse – L’intimite) – http://youtu.be/FKDir13g7ow
07:55 Nº 4 in C sharp minor. Presto (Torrent)
10:10 Nº 5 in G flat major. Vivace (Black Keys)
11:55 Nº 6 in E flat minor. Andante
14:49 Nº 7 in C major. Vivace (Toccata)
16:26 Nº 8 in F major. Allegro
18:51 Nº 9 in F minor. Allegro molto agitato
21:00 Nº 10 in A flat major. Vivace assai
23:14 Nº 11 in E flat major. Allegretto
26:17 Nº 12 in C minor. Allegro con fuoco (Revolutionary – Fall of Warsaw)

II. Book No.2: 12 Etudes for Piano Op.25, 1835-37.
This Op.25 collection bears a dedication to Liszt’s mistress, Countess Marie d’Agoult, a writer who used the pseudonym Daniel Stern (the Op.10 Études are dedicated to Franz Liszt). One reason Chopin attempted to capture Liszt’s sympathies with the dedications had to do with the performance design of the pieces in the two sets: each was written to highlight some facet of pianism.
28:57 Nº 1 in A flat major. Allegro sostenuto (Aeolian Harp – Shepherd Boy)
31:21 Nº 2 in F minor. Presto (Balm)
33:05 Nº 3 in F major. Allegro (Carwheel)
35:08 Nº 4 in A minor. Agitato
37:28 Nº 5 in E minor. Vivace
40:52 Nº 6 in G sharp minor. Allegro (Thirds)
43:00 Nº 7 in C sharp minor. Lento (Cello)
48:21 Nº 8 in D flat major. Vivace (Sixths)
49:30 Nº 9 in G flat major. Allegro assai (Butterfly)
50:35 Nº 10 in B minor. Allegro con fuoco
55:04 Nº 11 in A minor. Lento – Allegro con brio (Winter Wind)
58:41 Nº 12 in C minor. Allegro molto con fuoco (Ocean)

III. Trois Nouvelles Études for piano, 1839-40.
Chopin composed this set of etudes for the Méthode des methods, a publication of Ignaz Moscheles, a leading pianist and composer of his day who was not always in agreement with Chopin’s compositional techniques, and François-Joseph Fétis, a now largely forgotten Belgian musicologist.
1:01:26 Nº 1 in F minor
1:03:31 Nº 2 in A flat major
1:05:56 Nº 3 in D flat major

As always with Arrau, the Pianist takes a back seat to Music Making, are a prime example of how myth making regarding Arrau’s Recordings. Arrau approaches Chopin’s Etudes as a genuinely mature musician and sensitive interpreter. In Opus 10, No. 3, for instance, he infuses the music with a deep sadness that recalls its XIX Century title, “La Tristesse.” Incidentally, this record received the Grand Prix du Disque Frédéric Chopin from the Warsaw Chopin Society when it was re-released in 1990.

The 24 Études of Frédéric Chopin (divided into two separate opuses, 10 and 25, but actually composed almost simultaneously) remain the most significant entries in that particular musical genre. Chopin refers, in a letter dating from the fall of 1829, to having written a study “in [his] own manner,” and indeed, a great chasm stands between his achievements and the far drier études of his predecessors (one thinks of Moscheles, Czerny, and Hummel in particular). It was not Chopin’s intent, as it was with many nineteenth-century pianist-composers, to create studies of mere technique and raw dexterity; here, instead, are works with an inexhaustible array of textures, moods, and colors to explore. These are works meant for the concert hall as well as for the practice room

Despite the slightly cramped, airless sonics, Arrau’s characteristically warm and ample sonority makes itself felt in these 1956 recordings. The pianist uncovers layers of depth and disquiet in the slower Études that others merely prettify. The treacherous extensions in the E-Flat Étude, for instance, are distinctly projected and balanced, rather than strummed. Arrau’s spectacularly honest technique enables him to articulate Chopin’s sparkling figurations with a liquid legato unaided by the pedal.

Saint Saens – Piano conc.No.2 – Arthur Rubinstein: great compositions/performances


Saint Saens – Piano conc.No.2 – Arthur Rubinstein

Great Compositions/Performances: Wagner Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Prelude to Act I; Solti


[youtube.com/watch?v=3nhcTllJgIY]

Wagner Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Prelude to Act I; Solti

Wilhelm Richard Wagner
Sir Georg Solti
Vienna Philharmonic

This piece introduces the first act of the composer’s music drama called The Mastersingers of Nuremberg. Similar to his other operas, he wrote the scenario and libretto in addition to the musical score.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Rachmaninov / Artur Rubinstein, 1947: Rhapsody On A Theme Of Paganini, Op. 43 – RCA Vinyl


[youtube.com/watch?v=DpEAlVsMs9I]
From the LP shown above, issued in 1954. The recording you hear was made in 1947. Artur Rubinstein is soloist; Walter Susskind leads the Philharmonia Orchestra.

Note: Rubinstein hits a wrong note at the start of variation 19 (at about16:37). I would be interested to know if this error, for which at the time of this recording there was no technology to correct, has been edited in more recently produced CD versions of this performance.

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F.Great Performances: Chopin : Nocturne op. 9 no. 1 in B flat minor (Rubinstein)



Chopin’s first nocturne op. 9 no. 1 in B flat minor played by Rubinstein.
The Nocturnes, Op. 9 are a set of three nocturnes written by Frédéric Chopin between 1830 and 1832 and dedicated to Madame Camille Pleyel. The work was published in 1833.
This nocturne has a rhythmic freedom that came to characterise Chopin’s later work. The left hand has an unbroken sequence of quavers in simple arpeggios throughout the entire piece, while the right hand moves with freedom in patterns of eleven, twenty, and twenty-two notes.
The opening section moves into a contrasting middle section, which flows back to the opening material in a transitional passage where the melody floats above seventeen consecutive bars of D-flat major chords. The reprise of the first section grows out of this and the nocturne concludes peacefully with a Picardy third.

MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE!

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Arrau Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54



Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

1.- Allegro Affettuoso
2.- Intermezzo: Andantino Grazioso
3.- Allegro Vivace

Film footage recorded in 1963

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
Claudio Arrau (1903-1991)

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Grieg – Piano Concerto & Chopin: Piano Concerto – Arthur Rubinstein


Published on Mar 15, 2013

Magnificent two piano concerto`s Piano: Arthur Rubinstein, conducted: Andre Previn London Symphony Orchestra recorded 1975. Arthur Rubinstein was born in Łódź (January 28, 1887 — December 20, 1982), Congress Poland (part of the Russian Empire for the entire time Rubinstein resided there) on January 28, 1887, to a Jewish family. He was the youngest of seven children, and his father owned a small textile factory. Arthur Rubinstein. However, his United States impresario Sol Hurok insisted he be billed as Artur, and records were released in the West under both versions of his name. At the age of two, Rubinstein demonstrated perfect pitch and a fascination with the piano, watching his elder sister’s piano lessons. By the age of four, he was recognised as a child prodigy. His father had a predilection for the violin and offered Rubinstein a violin; but Rubinstein rejected it because he thought his instinct was for harmony and polyphony. The Hungarian violinist Joseph Joachim, on hearing the four-year-old child play, was greatly impressed, told Arthur’s family, 1894, seven-year-old Arthur Rubinstein had his debut with pieces by Mozart, Schubert and Mendelssohn. At the age of ten, Rubinstein moved to Berlin to continue his studies, and gave his first performance with the Berlin Philharmonic in 1900, at the age of 13. Rubinstein made his New York debut at Carnegie Hall in 1906, and thereafter toured the United States, Austria, Italy, and Russia. In 1912, he made his London debut, and found a home there in the Edith Grove, Chelsea, musical salon of Paul and Muriel Draper, in company with Kochanski, Igor Stravinsky, Jacques Thibaud, Pablo Casals, Pierre Monteux and others. During World War I, Rubinstein stayed in London, giving recitals and accompanying the violinist Eugène Ysaÿe. In 1916 and 1917, he made his first tours in Spain and South America where he was wildly acclaimed. It was during those tours that he developed a lifelong enthusiasm for the music of Enrique Granados, Isaac Albéniz, Manuel de Falla, and Heitor Villa-Lobos. He was the dedicatee of Villa-Lobos’s Rudepoêma and Stravinsky’s Trois mouvements de Petrouchka. Rubinstein was disgusted by Germany’s conduct during the war, and never played there again. His last performance in Germany was in 1914. In 1921 Rubinstein gave two American tours, travelling to New York with Karol Szymanowski and his close friend Paul Kochanski. In 1932, the pianist, who stated he neglected his technique in his early years, relying instead on natural talent, withdrew from concert life for several months of intensive study and practice. Rubinstein toured the United States again in 1937, his career becoming centered there during the World War II years when he lived in Brentwood, California. He became a naturalized American citizen in 1946. A cast of the pianist’s hands, at the Łódź museum During his time in California, Rubinstein provided the piano soundtrack for several films, including Song of Love with Katherine Hepburn. He appeared, as himself, in films Carnegie Hall and Of Men and Music. Although best known as a recitalist and concerto soloist, Rubinstein was also considered an outstanding chamber musician, partnering with such luminaries as Henryk Szeryng, Jascha Heifetz, Pablo Casals, Gregor Piatigorsky, and the Guarneri Quartet. Rubinstein recorded much of the core piano repertoire, particularly that of the Romantic composers. At the time of his death, the New York Times in describing him wrote, “Chopin was his specialty . . . it was [as] a Chopinist that he was considered by many without peer”. With the exception of the Études, he recorded most of the works of Chopin. He was one of the earliest champions of the Spanish and South American composers and of French composers who, in the early twentieth century, were still considered “modern” such as Debussy and Ravel. In addition, Rubinstein was the first champion of the music of his compatriot Karol Szymanowski. Rubinstein, in conversation with Alexander Scriabin, named Brahms as his favorite composer, a response that enraged Scriabin. In 1975, a documentary named Artur Rubinstein, Love of Life was on; a TV special named Rubinstein at 90 represented he had been playing for people for eight decades. By the mid-1970s, Rubinstein’s eyesight had begun to deteriorate. He retired from the stage at age eighty-nine in May 1976, giving his last concert at London’s Wigmore Hall, where he had first played nearly seventy years before. Rubinstein, who was fluent in eight languages, held much of the repertoire, not simply that of the piano, in his formidable memory.

 

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Make music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467 (Elvira Madigan) Pollini/Muti



Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467

Orchestra Filarmonica della Scala
Maurizio Pollini, piano
Riccardo Muti, conductor
(2004)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto No. 21 in C majorK. 467, was completed on March 9, 1785 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, four weeks after the completion of the previous D minor concerto, K. 466.[1][2]

The concerto has three movements:

 

  1. Allegro maestoso; in common time. The tempo marking is in Mozart’s catalog of his own works, but not in the autograph manuscript.[3]
  2. Andante in F major. In both the autograph score and in his personal catalog, Mozart notated the meter as Alla breve[4]
  3. Allegro vivace assai

Recordings:  This work has been recorded numerous times by many famous pianists including Géza AndaPiotr Anderszewski,Vladimir AshkenazyDaniel BarenboimMalcolm BilsonAlfred BrendelRobert CasadesusIvan DrenikovAnnie FischerWalter GiesekingFriedrich GuldaStephen HoughKeith JarrettWilhelm KempffWalter KlienAlicia de LarrochaGiorgi LatsabidzeRosina LhevinneDinu LipattiRadu LupuMurray PerahiaMaria João Pires,Maurizio PolliniArthur RubinsteinFazil SayAndrás SchiffArtur SchnabelRudolf SerkinHoward Shelley,Mitsuko Uchida, and Christian Zacharias.

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Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin Fantaisie Impromptu in C sharp Minor, Op. 66 Posth


Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin Fantaisie Impromptu in C sharp Minor, Op. 66 Posth

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Fabulous Performances: Artur Rubinstein plays Liebestraum nº3 Liszt (“without a scratch”)



Artur Rubinstein plays Liebestraum nº3 Liszt (without a scratch)
(Rec. 1954)

 

Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin Ballade No. 3 in A-flat major, Op. 47


Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin Ballade No. 3 in A-flat major, Op. 47

Franz Schubert String Quintet in C major D956 op posth 163 Villa Musica Ensemble



Franz Schubert:
String Quintet in C major, D. 956, op. posth. 163:
00:00     I. Allegro ma non troppo
19:54     II. Adagio
34:54   III. Scherzo. Presto – Trio. Andante sostenuto
45:42   IV. Allegretto

[Villa Musica Ensemble]

Photography: Wu Kai Sha, Hong Kong, by Lifeguard.

 

Impromptu No. 1 Op.29 In Ab – Chopin



The Frederic Chopin Complete Works
Piano: Andre Silotti

 

RUBINSTEIN – CHOPIN Andante Spianato & Grande Polonaise in Eb, Op. 22 (2)


Buy “Andante Spianato and Grand Polonaise, Op. 22 in E-flat: Grand Polonaise” on

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Artur RUBINSTEIN – LISZT Mephisto Waltz No.1


Chopin: Ballade No. 4, Op. 52 Arthur Rubinstein


Buy “Ballade No. 4 in F Minor, Op. 52” on

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Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin Scherzo No. 4 in E major, Op. 54


English: Arthur Rubinstein, pianist, in Prague...

English: Arthur Rubinstein, pianist, in Prague 1914 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Rubinstein Mozart Piano Concertos 17, 20, 21, 23 & 24 (access and listen online to KMOZART-see widget on sidebar)


Concerto No. 17 in G major, KV. 453 II — 0:12:23 , III — 0:24:06 

Concerto No. 20 in D minor, KV. 466 (): I — 0:32:06 , II – 0:45:57 , III —0:55:03 ,

Concerto No. 21 in C major, KV. 467 : I — 1:02:57 , II — 1:17:40 , III – 1:24:17 ,

Concerto No. 23 in A major KV. 488: I – 1:31:06 , II – 1:42:34 , III — 1:49:56 ,

Concerto No. 24, KV. 491: I — 1:58:00 , II — 2:12:45 , III —2:21:09

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote 27 concertos for piano and orchestra. These works, many of which Mozart composed for himself to play in the Vienna concert series of 1784–86, held a special place for him; indeed, Mozart’s father apparently interrupted him composing a “harpsichord concerto” at age 4. For a long time relatively neglected, they have come to be seen as containing some of his greatest achievements. Tovey championed them in his Essay on the Classical Concerto in 1903, and later came the famous books by Cuthbert Girdlestone and Arthur Hutchings in 1940 (originally published in French) and 1948, respectively. Hans Tischler published a structural and thematic analysis of the concertos in 1966, followed by the works by Charles Rosen, and Leeson and Robert Levin.[1] In recent years, two of the concertos have also been covered in the Cambridge Music Handbook series. The first complete edition was not until that of Richault from around 1850; and since then the scores and autographs have become widely available through the publications of, among others, NortonEulenberg and Dover.

Mozart Piano Concertos
Wolfgang-amadeus-mozart 1.jpg
Number of concertos: 27
Instrumentation: Piano and orchestra
Dates of composition: 1767–1791 >>>>    more     HERE

FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN – PIANO CONCERTO NO. 2 IN F MINOR OP. 21 – ARTHUR RUBINSTEIN


I. Maestoso – 
Arthur Rubinstein, piano – 
London Symphony Orchestra – 
André Previn, conductor –
1975 
ARTE – Broadcast

Frédéric Chopin Piano Concerto N.º 2 Op. 21 in F minor – II Larghetto
1829. The slow movements find Frédéric Chopin at his most generously rhapsodic, the pianist diving off on sublime flights of fantasy while the orquestra offer a glowing curtain of sound.

Frédéric Chopin Piano Concerto N.º 2 Op. 21 in F minor – III Allegro Vivace
1829.

 

Arthur Rubinstein plays Chopin: Concerto no. 2


The most astonishing music ever written, of a unique sensibility: Chopin, unique in every way!

Arthur Rubinstein is accompanied here by the Israel Philharmonic with Zubin Mehta at the Royal Festival Hall in London in 1968.

From Wikipedia: “The Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minorOp. 21, is a piano concerto composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. Chopin wrote the piece before he had finished his formal education, at around 20 years of age. It was first performed on 17 March 1830, in WarsawPoland, with the composer as soloist. It was the second of his piano concertos to be published (after the Piano Concerto No. 1), and so was designated as “No. 2”, even though it was written first.

The work contains the three movements typical of instrumental concertos of the period.

  1. Maestoso
  2. Larghetto
  3. Allegro vivace

What makes Chopin’s Op. 21 an early-Romantic concerto par excellence is the dominance of the piano part. After introducing the first movement, the orchestra cedes all responsibility for musical development to the piano; there is none of the true interplay of forces that is the mainstay of the classical concerto. The idea that Chopin is a poor orchestrator is an oft-flogged dead horse of music criticism; Berlioz, himself a master orchestrator, was harsh in his appraisal, calling Chopin’s treatment “nothing but a cold and useless accompaniment.” Again, the criticism seems moot. If Chopin treated the orchestra merely as a platter on which to serve the piano, it was because the genre demanded it.”

Indeed a concert for Piano and Orchestra, rather than the other way around: I personally think that an orchestra couldn’t serve for better company for a piano, than in this concert!

 

Paganini Rhapsody (Rachmaninoff) – Arthur Rubinstein –


Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini
Op. 43 in A minor
Sergei Rachmaninoff

Soloist: Arthur Rubinstein
Conductor: Alfred Wallenstein

Interview with Artur Rubinstein: One of those moment when one lives up to his humanity!


One of those moment when one lives up to his humanity: 

Polski: Artur Rubinstein (1887-1982) – polski ...

Polsky: Arthur Rubinstein (1887-1982) (Image via Wikipedia)

“Life is what it gives you, what is in front of you!” Nothing more.”