Tag Archives: Artist

A lot of Love, poetic thought by George B. (the smudge and other poems Page) inspired and with dedication to ‘Como Agua Para Chocolate’, by the Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel


Lots of Love, poetic thought by George B.
(the smudge and other poems Page)

She first mixed the ingredients,
then added salt and sweat,
and other delicate things to the dough
she mixed and beat, and slammed and slammed
with powerful fists,
before

rolling
flattening
spreading the dough
on whole the top of the  board –
she did that many time…

Now  it all became quiet,
a quiet wait while

inside that silence the yeast was waking up the dough , 
engulfed in the mixture,
almost…ready to burst…

the oven preheated,

“time to open the gates to the baking heat”, she thought…

the moist heat of the oven –
time to release the moisture within –

let it float,
once more all around,  free,  in the boxed heat.

Now, all that was left was…cookies….while,
still very special, 

cookies,

with a sprinkle of Cinnamon
nutmeg
trace of… cloves
and  lots of love.

– George-B.

Inspired, and with dedication to Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel,   and her popular  novel Like Water for Chocolate (Spanish: Como agua para chocolate), the  popular novel published in 1989,  and the amazing magical realism by which  food is  one of the major themes in the story which is seen throughout the story. It is used very creatively to represent the characters feelings and situations.

Copyright © 2015 [George Bost]. All Rights Reserved.

 

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The Temple on the Hilltop_emergence-2_ FotoSketcher (My Art Collection)


The Temple on the Hilltop_emergence-2_ FotoSketcher (My Art Collection)

The Temple on the Hilltop_emergence-2_ FotoSketcher (My Art Collection) (click to enlarge to full splendor)

The Temple on the Hilltop_emergence-2_ FotoSketcher (My Art Collection) (click to enlarge to full splendor)

White Gardenia_FotoSketcher_oil Base Painting (my Art Collection)


White Gardenia_FotoSketcher_oil Base Painting (my Art Collection)

White Gardenia_FotoSketcher_oil Base Painting (my Art Collection)

image of the day: EUZICASA Audiobook Stand : Thomas Paine Publishes Common Sense (audiobook here-close caption in several languages)



Thomas Paine Publishes Common Sense
On January 9, 1776, propagandist Thomas Paine anonymously published Common Sense, advocating an immediate declaration of independence from Britain. An instant bestseller in both the colonies and in Britain, Paine baldly stated that King George III was a tyrant and that Americans should shed any sentimental attachment to the monarchy. America, he argued, had a moral obligation to reject monarchy. ‘O! ye that love mankind! Ye that dare opposed not only the tyranny but the tyrant, stand forth! Every spot of the Old World is overrun with oppression. Freedom hath been hunted around the globe…. O! receive the fugitive and prepare in time an asylum for mankind,’ he urged. Within a few years, a land with a population of 2.5 million had bought 500,000 copies of Paine’s stirring call for independence.

(Image: Library of Congress)

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.qG4LItb2.dpuf

Common Sense Audiobook by Thomas Paine (February 4, 1776)

Today’s Picture: January 1, 1892, after two years of construction, the U.S. Immigration Service opened Ellis Island in New York Harbor



On January 1, 1892, after two years of construction, the U.S. Immigration Service opened Ellis Island in New York Harbor, a new facility for ‘processing’ immigrants. Formerly used as a munitions dump and landfill, Ellis Island was designed, its architects claimed, to handle more than 8,000 newcomers a day. Orderly lines funneled bewildered immigrants past doctors and officials who examined them for signs of disease. The physically and mentally ill were refused admittance, forcing thousands of families to make the difficult decision to return home with a relative refused entry or push on without them. A final brusque interview by an immigration official determined whether the newcomers had already been promised jobs. About 80 percent of those who entered Ellis Island received landing cards permitting them to board ferries for New York City. In the 1890s, 75 percent of all immigrants entered the United States through Ellis Island. – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.yUdRynY2.dpuf

Castanets


Castanets

Now used primarily in Spanish dance music, castanets are percussion instruments that were known to the ancient Egyptians and Greeks. Of the many kinds, the most common consist of two small matching pieces of hard wood or ivory, joined at the inner edge and used with a thin strap in the player’s hand. They are snapped together between the palm and fingers and used to produce clicks for rhythmic accents, especially to accompany dancing. What is the origin of the instrument’s name? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Mao Zedong (1893)


Mao Zedong (1893)

Chairman Mao established the People’s Republic of China in 1949. His Great Leap Forward, an economic plan launched in 1958 to modernize and industrialize China, was an unmitigated disaster that eventually led to the starvation of tens of millions of people. He later launched a movement to eliminate counterrevolutionary elements in the country’s institutions, leading to the destruction of much of China’s cultural heritage and the imprisonment of many Chinese intellectuals. What was it called? More… Discuss

The lemon Pipers Green Tambourine: Sony Music Entertainment Audio 254,184 views 6 years ago


Liszt Consolation D flat major No.3 (S.172), Valentina Lisitsa: Great compositions/performances


Today’s Birthday – December 2: Georges Seurat


Today’s Birthday:  December 2

Georges Seurat
1859–1891, French painter.

He devised the pointillist technique of painting in tiny dots of pure color. His method, called divisionism, was a systematic refinement of the broken color of the impressionists. His major achievements are his Baignade (Tate Gall., London), shown in the Salon des Independants in 1884, and his masterpiece, Un Dimanche à la Grande Jatte (Art Inst., Chicago), completed two years later. He died of pneumonia at 31. Seurat is recognized as one of the most intellectual artists of his time and was a great influence in restoring harmonious and deliberate design and a thorough understanding of color combination to painting at a time when sketching from nature had become the mode. Other examples of Seurat’s work are in the Barnes Foundation, Merion, Pa., and in the Louvre.

Bibliography:

See catalog (ed. by A. Blunt and R. Fry, 1965); drawings (ed. by R. L. Herbert, 1966); complete paintings, ed. by John Rewald and Henri Dorra (1988); biographies by John Russell (1985) and Pierre Courthion (1988).

Also Born on December 2

Gallery

Graffiti at Turnbull Canyon Water Tower (I called it “Outdoors Art Center/messate Board”)

This gallery contains 12 photos.


Graffiti Graffiti is a form of visual communication, usually illegal, involving the unauthorized marking of public space by an individual or group. Derived from the Italian word graffio (“scratch”), “graffiti” technically applies to designs scratched through a layer of paint … Continue reading