Tag Archives: Associated Press

make music part of your life series: , Ottorino Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances Suite III



O. Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances Suite III.

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

English: Ottorino Respighi, photography by Mad...

English: Ottorino Respighi, photography by Madeline Grimoldi at 1935 Deutsch: Ottorino Respighi, Fotografie von Madeline Grimoldi um 1935 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2013)

Ancient Airs and Dances (Italian: Antiche arie e danze) is a set of three orchestral suites by Italian composer Ottorino Respighi. In addition to being a renowned composer and conductor, Respighi was also a notable musicologist. His interest in Italian music of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries led him to compose works inspired by the music of these periods.

Suite No. 3 (1932)

Suite No. 3 was composed in 1932. It differs from the previous two suites in that it is arranged for strings only and somewhat melancholy in overall mood. It is based on lute songs by Besard, a piece for baroque guitar by Ludovico Roncalli, and lute pieces by Santino Garsi da Parma and additional anonymous composers.

  1. Italiana (Anonymous: Italiana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  2. Arie di corte (Jean-Baptiste Besard: Arie di corte (Sec.XVI) – Andante cantabile – Allegretto – Vivace – Slow with great expression – Allegro vivace – Vivacissimo – Andante cantabile)
  3. Siciliana (Anonymous: Siciliana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  4. Passacaglia (Lodovico Roncalli: Passacaglia (1692) – Maestoso – Vivace)
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today’s birthday: Paul Gauguin (1848)


Paul Gauguin (1848)

First a sailor and then a successful stockbroker in Paris, Gauguin took up painting on weekends when he was in his mid-20s. Eventually, with the encouragement of Impressionist painter Camille Pissarro, he devoted himself completely to art, quitting his job and separating from his wife and five children. Today, he is recognized as a highly influential founding father of modern art whose bold experiments with color led directly to the Synthetist style. What did Gauguin and Van Gogh have in common? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


clock_fall_back_animatedToday In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
June 5

1099   Members of the First Crusade witness an eclipse of the moon and interpret it as a sign they will recapture Jerusalem.
1568   Ferdinand, the Duke of Alba, crushes the Calvinist insurrection in Ghent.
1595   Henry IV’s army defeats the Spanish at the Battle of Fontaine-Francaise.
1637   American settlers in New England massacre a Pequot Indian village.
1783   Joseph and Jacques Montgolfier make the first public balloon flight.
1794   The U.S. Congress prohibits citizens from serving in any foreign armed forces.
1827   Athens falls to Ottoman forces.
1851   Harriet Beecher Stow publishes the first installment of Uncle Tom’s Cabin in The National Era.
1856   U.S. Army troops in the Four creeks region of California, head back to quarters, officially ending the Tule River War. Fighting, however, will continue for a few more years.
1863   The Confederate raider CSS Alabama captures the Talisman in the Mid-Atlantic.
1872   The Republican National Convention, the first major political party convention to includes blacks, commences.
1880   Wild woman of the west Myra Maybelle Shirley marries Sam Starr even though records show she was already married to Bruce Younger.
1900   British troops under Lord Roberts seize Pretoria from the Boers.
1940   The German army begins its offensive in Southern France.
1944   The first B-29 bombing raid strikes the Japanese rail line in Bangkok, Thailand.
1947   Secretary of State George C. Marshall outlines “The Marshall Plan,” a program intended to assist European nations, including former enemies, to rebuild their economies.
1956   Premier Nikita Khrushchev denounces Josef Stalin to the Soviet Communist Party Congress.
1967   The Six-Day War between Israel and Egypt, Syria and Jordan begins.
1968   Sirhan Sirhan shoots Democratic presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy after Kennedy’s victory in the pivotal California primary election.
1973   Doris A. Davis becomes the first African-American woman to govern a city in a major metropolitan area when she is elected mayor of Compton, California.
2004   Former U.S. President Ronald Reagan dies at age 93. Reagan was the 40th president of the United States.
Born on June 5
1723   Adam Smith, Scottish philosopher and economist.
1878   Francisco “Pancho” Villa, Mexican revolutionary and guerrilla leader.
1883   John Maynard Keynes, economist.
1884   Dame Ivy Compton-Burnett, British author.
1898   Federico Garcia Lorca, Spanish poet and dramatist.
1915   Alfred Kazin, critic and editor (A Walker in the City).
1919   Richard Scarry, Children’s author and illustrator.
1926   David Wagoner, poet and novelist (The Escape Artist).
1932   Christy Brown, Irish novelist and poet (My Left Foot).
1939   Margaret Drabble, English novelist (The Millstone, The Realms of Gold).
1947   David Hare, British playwright and director (A Map of the World, Slag).
1949   Ken Follett, novelist (Eye of the Needle, On The Wings of Eagles).

today’s birthday: Heinrich Wieland (1877)


 

Heinrich Wieland (1877)

Wieland was a German chemist who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1927 for determining the molecular structure of bile acids, which are produced by the liver. His work provided insight into the mechanism by which bile acids aid in the resorption of food in the intestines and led to the establishment of the close relationship between cholesterol and the bile acids. How did Wieland help students who were persecuted under the Nuremberg Laws of Nazi Germany? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First Pulitzer Prizes Awarded (1917)


First Pulitzer Prizes Awarded (1917)

The Pulitzer Prizes—prestigious awards presented annually by Columbia University for achievements in American journalism, literature, and music—were created by journalist and publisher Joseph Pulitzer, whose will funded the establishment of Columbia’s school of journalism as well as the prizes. Ironically, Columbia had rejected donation offers from Pulitzer during his lifetime because, as one of the originators of yellow journalism, he was regarded as unscrupulous. What do prizewinners receive? More… Discuss

Historic musical bits: Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic


 Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic

quotation: Nobody has a more sacred obligation to obey the law than those who make the law. Sophocles


Nobody has a more sacred obligation to obey the law than those who make the law.

Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC) Discuss

Word: lissome


lissome

Definition: (adjective) Easily bent; supple.
Synonyms: lithe, supple, slender
Usage: There was a grace, which no austerity could diminish, about every movement of her lissome, slender form. Discuss.

American voters reject Washington as it is.#uniteblue #BernieSanders— AlterNet (@AlterNet)


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this day in history: Bare-Knuckle Fighter Dies After 99-Round Fight (1833)


Bare-Knuckle Fighter Dies After 99-Round Fight (1833)

In 1830, bare-knuckle prizefighter Simon Byrne, Ireland‘s heavyweight boxing champion, fought Alexander McKay, the “Champion of Scotland,” for the right to challenge England‘s heavyweight champ. McKay died of a head injury shortly after losing the lengthy fight, and Byrne was charged but later cleared of manslaughter. Three years later, Byrne fought England’s champion, James Burke. After 3 hours and 99 rounds, Byrne was knocked out. He died days later. What became of Burke after the fatal fight? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Francis Younghusband (1863)


Francis Younghusband (1863)

Younghusband was a British Army officer and explorer remembered for his travels in the Far East and Central Asia. In 1887, he journeyed from China to India, crossing the Gobi desert and the Mustagh Pass of the Karakorum range. In 1904, he led a military expedition that participated in the massacring of Tibetan troops and forced a treaty upon Tibet that opened it to Western trade. Apparently, he later regretted his role in these events. What changed his mind? More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Saturday, May 30th, 2015: St. Joan of Arc


Image of St. Joan of Arc

St. Joan of Arc

St. Joan of Arc is the patroness of soldiers and of France. On January 6, 1412, Joan of Arc was born to pious parents of the French peasant class, at the obscure village of Domremy, near the province … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

quotation: There is no instance of a nation benefiting from prolonged warfare. Sun Tzu (544 BC-496 BC)


There is no instance of a nation benefiting from prolonged warfare.

Sun Tzu (544 BC-496 BC) Discuss

Pope Francis: Fear and joylessness are signs of bad spiritual health :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


By Ann Schneible

PHOTO:  Pope Francis at the papal ordination of priests in St. Peter’s Basilica on April 26, 2015. Credit: Bohumil Petrik/CNA.

Vatican City, May 15, 2015 / 11:40 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his daily homily on Friday Pope Francis said that Christian communities become “sick” when they live in fear and fail to be joyful – even when times are difficult.

“When the Church is fearful and when the Church does not receive the joy of the Holy Spirit, the Church is sick, the communities are sick, the faithful are sick,” the Pope said during Mass at the Santa Marta residence May 15.

He added that the Christian community grows “sick with worldliness” when “it does not have the joy of Christ.”

“A Christian without joy is not Christian. A Christian who continually lives in sadness is not Christian. And a Christian who, in the moment of trial, of illness, of so many difficulties, loses peace – something is lacking in him.”

These two words – “fear” and “joy” – and what each means for the Christian community, were at the center of the Holy Father’s homily.

Speaking first on fear, Pope Francis explained: “A fearful Christian is a person who has not understood the message of Jesus.”

This kind of fear provokes a self-centered selfishness which leads to a sort of paralysis. It “harms us. It weakens us, it diminishes us. It even paralyzes us,” the Pope said.

Recalling how Jesus told Saint Paul to speak and not be afraid, he said: Fear is not a Christian attitude.”

Rather, it is an attitude of a “caged animal” who lacks the freedom to look forward, create, and do good, being prevented by a sense of danger.

“This fear is a vice,” he added.

Pope Francis said this fear and lack of courage jeopardizes the health of those communities which to forbid everything in an effort to always be safe.

“It seems they have written on the gateway: ‘Forbidden,’” he said. “And you enter into this community and the air is stale, because it is a sick community.”

MORE: via Pope Francis: Fear and joylessness are signs of bad spiritual health :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

RIP: “The Thrill Is Gone” BB King


Thrill of a Lifetime (album)

Thrill of a Lifetime (album) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

today’s birthday: Charles Peace (1832)


Charles Peace (1832)

Peace was a notorious English burglar and murderer whose life spawned many romanticized works of fiction, including dozens of novels and films and even a comic strip. After stints in prison and a criminal career spanning decades, Peace was finally captured and imprisoned on charges of burglary and the attempted murder of a police officer. He was then tried for a past murder and was sentenced to death. Peace is mentioned by name in what Sherlock Holmes short story? More… Discuss

New at the #Vatican: Palestinian Liberation Organization –> State of Palestine.— Religion NewsService (@RNS) May 13, 2015


Vatican decision to recognize Palestine upsets Israeli government, Jewish advocacy groups – Religion News Service


JERUSALEM (RNS) The Vatican’s decision to recognize Palestine as a sovereign state on Wednesday (May 13) angered Israeli officials.

The move comes four days before the first-ever canonization of two Palestinian nuns and it solidifies the standing of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, who is scheduled to meet with Pope Francis at the Vatican on Saturday.

Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman Emmanuel Nahshon told The Times of Israel that the government is “disappointed by the decision. We believe that such a decision is not conducive to bringing the Palestinians back to the negotiating table.”

Israel insists that for the Palestinians to achieve statehood, they must first end their armed struggle against Israel and recognize its right to exist as the homeland of the Jewish people.

Although the treaty codifies the Holy See’s relations with the Palestinian Authority, the Vatican has already referred to the “State of Palestine” in some official documents, including the official program handed out during Pope Francis’ Holy Land pilgrimage last year.

In recent years, the Vatican has stepped up its efforts to support Palestinian Christians in East Jerusalem, the West Bank and Gaza as their numbers have dwindled due to emigration spurred by wars and economic hardships.

A majority of Christians in the Holy Land — including Israel — are either ethnic Palestinians or live alongside them in the same towns and villages. Sisters Maria Baouardy and Mary Alphonsine Danil Ghattas, who were both Christian Arabs, are due to be canonized by Pope Francis on Sunday.

William Shomali, the auxiliary bishop of the Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem, said the Vatican’s announcement “was not a surprise” because “the pope called President Abbas the president of the State of Palestine” during his 2014 pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

But David Harris, executive director of the AJC, the leading global Jewish advocacy organization, said the decision was “regrettable“ and “counterproductive to all who seek true peace between Israel and the Palestinians.”

“We are fully cognizant of the pope’s goodwill and desire to be a voice for peaceful coexistence, which is best served, we believe, by encouraging a resumption of Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, rather than unilateral gestures outside the framework of the negotiating table,” Harris concluded.

Abraham H. Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League, said the action was “premature” and would “undermine the only real solution to the decades-old conflict, which is engaging in direct negotiations.”

YS/MG END CHABIN

Categories: Institutions, Politics

Tags: AJC, Foreign Ministry, Israel, Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, Palestine, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, Vatican

via Vatican decision to recognize Palestine upsets Israeli government, Jewish advocacy groups – Religion News Service.

Pope Francis Is Making Saints Out Of Two Palestinian Nuns


VATICAN CITY (RNS) Pope Francis will bestow sainthood on two Palestinian nuns on Sunday (May 17), a move that’s being seen as giving hope to the conflict-wracked Middle East and shining the spotlight on the plight of Christians in the region.

Sisters Maria Baouardy and Mary Alphonsine Danil Ghattas are due to be canonized by the pontiff along with two other 19th-century nuns, Sister Jeanne Emilie de Villeneuve, from France, and Italian Sister Maria Cristina dell’Immacolata.

The coming canonizations have been described by the Latin patriarch of Jerusalem, Fouad Twal, as a “sign of hope” for the region.

“The canonization of these two Palestinian saints is a spiritual highpoint for the inhabitants of the Holy Land,” he told Vatican Insider.

“The fact that Mariam (Maria) and Marie (Mary) Alphonsine, the first modern Palestinian saints, are both Arabs is a sign of hope for Palestine, for the entire Holy Land and the Middle East: holiness is always possible, even in a war-torn region. May a generation of saints follow them!”

Twal will travel to the Vatican for the canonizations and has invited Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to the ceremony.

Palestinians have waited more than 30 years for the sainthood of Baouardy, following her beatification by St. John Paul II in 1983.

Born into the Melchite Greek Catholic Church in 1846, in a village near Nazareth, Baouardy went on to join the Carmel of Pau in France. Despite being illiterate, she was sent to India where she founded other convents, before moving to Bethlehem where she died in 1878.

Announcing the canonization in February, the Vatican said Baouardy “experienced many sufferings together with extraordinary mystic phenomena” from an early age.

Ghattas, who was beatified by Pope Benedict XVI in 2009, lived a distinctly less international life. Born in Jerusalem in 1843, she entered the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Apparition at the age of 15. She went on to found the Congregation of Sisters of the Most Holy Rosary of Jerusalem and “worked tirelessly to help young people and Christian mothers,” the Vatican said.

The canonization of the two nuns will inevitably draw attention to Palestine and the Middle East, a region that Francis has repeatedly highlighted in recent months.

In his Easter address, the pope said: “We pray for peace for all the peoples of the Holy Land. May the culture of encounter grow between Israelis and Palestinians and the peace process be resumed, in order to end years of suffering and division.”

He additionally called for an end to “the roar of arms” in Syria and Iraq, while also pushing for a stop to “barbarous acts of violence” in Libya and peace in Yemen.

Twal had no doubt that the approaching sainthoods would have a positive impact on the entire region.

“I am sure that it will rekindle the hope of our faithful in the Middle East and encourage them to remain firm in the faith and keep their eyes fixed on heaven,” he said, “especially in these difficult times that Christians are experiencing there.”

via Pope Francis Is Making Saints Out Of Two Palestinian Nuns.

When was the last time you said ‘thank you’ and ‘I’m sorry?’ Pope asks :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


 

 

By Elise Harris

By Elise Harris

Vatican City, May 13, 2015 / 09:04 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his general audience Pope Francis focused on the concrete challenges families face in daily life, and said that simply remembering to be grateful and to apologize can go a long way in avoiding conflict.

“Dear brothers and sisters, today’s catechesis is the opening of the door to a series of reflections on family life, real life, daily life,” the Pope told pilgrims present in St. Peter’s Square May 13.

“Above this door are written three words that we have already used other times: May I, thank you, and I’m sorry. They are words linked to good manners, (and) in their genuine sense of respect and desire for good, (they are) far away from any hypocrisy and duplicity,” he said.

Francis’ address was a continuation of his ongoing catechesis on the family, which he began at the end of last year as part of the lead-up to the World Day of Families in September, as well as October’s Synod of Bishops on the Family.

Although the words ’May I,’ ‘thank you’ and ‘I’m sorry’ can be hard to say or put into practice, their absence “can cause cracks in the foundation of the family, which can lead to its collapse,” the Pope said.

However, if families make a habit of including the phrases in their daily lives as a sign of love for one another rather than just a formal expression of good manners, they can strengthen a happy family life, he continued.

The word ‘May I’ is a reminder that we should be “delicate, respectful and patient with others,” he said. Even if we feel like we have the right to something, “when we speak to our spouse or family member with kindness we create space for a true spirit of marital and familial common life.”

Kindness helps to renew trust and respect, and reveals the love we have for others, the Pope noted, saying that we should always imitate Jesus, who stands at the door of our hearts and knocks, waiting for us to open it to him.

He then turned to the second word, noting that to say ‘thank you’ can seem like a contradiction in a distrustful society, which tends to view this attitude as weakness.

Despite this perception, it is through an “education in gratitude” that that social justice and the dignity of persons are upheld, he said.

Gratitude Francis continued, “is a virtue that for believers is born from the same heart of their faith… (it) is also the language of God, to whom above all we must express our gratitude.”

via When was the last time you said ‘thank you’ and ‘I’m sorry?’ Pope asks :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim


Biography: Pepe Romero, World Renouned Classic Guitar Player


Pepe Romero

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaPepe Romero (born March 8, 1944 in Málaga, Spain) is a world-renowned classical and flamenco guitarist. He is particularly famous for his outstanding technique and colorful musical interpretations on the instrument.

Pepe Romero
Pepe Romero 2000.JPG

Pepe Romero in 2000
Background information
Born March 8, 1944 (age 71)
Málaga, Spain
Genres Classical music, flamenco
Occupation(s) Guitarist, arranger
Instruments Guitar
Years active fl. ca. 1959 – present
Labels Philips Records
Associated acts The Romero Guitar Quartet
Website www.peperomero.com
Notable instruments
Torres 1856

Biography

As a soloist Pepe Romero has appeared in the United States, Canada, Europe, China, and many countries around the world with the Toronto, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago, Houston, Pittsburgh, Boston, San Francisco and Dallas Symphony Orchestras, as well as with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the New York, Bogota and Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestras, the Boston Pops Orchestra, the Hong Kong Sinfonietta and the London Symphony Orchestra, the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, the Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra, I Musici, the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, Philharmonia Hungarica, the Hungarian State Orchestra, the Spanish National Orchestra, the Spanish National Radio/Television Orchestra, L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, The New Moscow Chamber Orchestra, the Springfiled Orchestra, the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, the American Sinfonietta and the Bournemouth Symphony. He has been a special guest at the festivals of Salzburg, Israel, Schleswig-Holstein, Menuhin, Osaka, Granada, Istanbul, Ravinia, Garden State, Hollywood Bowl, Blossom, Wolf Trap, Saratoga and Hong Kong.

Since his first recording (at the age of 15) he has recorded over 50 solo albums and 30 albums as part of the famed guitar quartet The Romeros. He has played for Presidents Carter and Nixon, the Queen of the Netherlands, the Prince of Wales and Pope John Paul II. He has numerous international recording awards to his credit and has received an Honorary Doctorate in Music from University of Victoria.

His contributions to the field of classical guitar have inspired a number of distinguished composers to write works specifically for him, including Joaquín Rodrigo, Federico Moreno Torroba, Rev. Francisco de Madina, Lorenzo Palomo, Michael Zearott, Enrique Diemecke, and Celedonio Romero.

Pepe Romero is the second son of Celedonio Romero, who was his only guitar teacher. His first professional appearance was in a shared concert with his father when Pepe was only seven years old. In 1957 Celedonio Romero left Franco‘s Spain for the United States with his family.

On February 11, 2000, King Juan Carlos I of Spain knighted Pepe Romero and his brothers, Celin and Ángel, into the Order of “Isabel la Catolica.” The official ceremony of this high honor took place at the USC Thornton School of Music, and included a gala performance by The Romeros with the Thornton Chamber Orchestra. He is currently Adjunct Professor of Classical Guitar at the Thornton School, where he was named “Distinguished Artist in Residence” in 2004.[1][2]

Although originally a classical guitarist, he is talented in Flamenco and a popular Flamenco performer. His most famous Flamenco-only album is called ¡Flamenco Fenómeno!

The Romero Guitar Quartet

The Romero Guitar Quartet

Related Stories:    HERE

https://euzicasa.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/pepe-romero-plays-fantasia-para-un-gentilhombre-by-joaquin-rodrigo-great-compositionsperformances/

Eating healthy is much more expensive than 10%— Fitness Motivation


Rosenborg Castle


Rosenborg Castle

Rosenborg Castle is situated at the center of the Danish capital, Copenhagen. It was built in 1606 in the Dutch Renaissance style and went through several expansions to arrive at its present condition in 1624. It was used by Danish regents as a royal residence until around 1710 and was opened to the public in 1838. Today, it is popular with tourists who flock to the castle to view the Danish Crown Regalia. How many people visit the Rosenborg Castle Garden every year? More… Discuss

word: empirical


empirical

Definition: (adjective) Relying on or derived from observation or experiment.
Synonyms: objective
Usage: Scientists insist on empirical results, not mere speculation, to support their theories. Discuss.

just a thought : Is a right system of feelings more selfish than a wrong system of rationalizing?


just a thought : Is a right system of feelings more selfish than a wrong system of rationalizing?
– George-B

picture of the day: St. Lo, France (In the summer of 1944)



St. Lo, France

In the summer of 1944, two French boys watch from a hilltop as convoys of Allied vehicles pass through the badly damaged city of St. Lo en route to the battle front. St. Lo was the scene of major fighting the latter stages of the Normandy campaign during World War II.

Photo: U.S. Army Signal Corps

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.OSqSJkFy.dpuf

today’s holiday: Blessing of the Shrimp Fleet


 

Blessing of the Shrimp Fleet

In the coastal town of Bayou La Bartre, Alabama, the shrimp blessing has been celebrated since 1950. The fleet blessing began simply: a priest went up and down the bayou blessing the boats tied to the docks. Now some 25,000 people come for the blessing ceremony by the priest of St. Margaret Roman Catholic Church, and a parade of boats decorated with pennants, bunting, and papier-mâché figures. Other events include contests in oyster shucking, shrimp heading, and crab picking; seafood and gumbo dinners; a fiddler-crab race for children; and the crowning of the Fleet Queen. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Irrigation Festival


Irrigation Festival

The Irrigation Festival is the oldest continuous festival in Washington, held since 1896 in Sequim. Originally known as “May Days,” the festival celebrated the opening of the first ditch to bring water from the Dungeness River to the arid Sequim prairie. In the early days, there were horse races, dancing, a keg of beer hidden in the brush, and tables loaded with food. Today, thousands come for a week of activities: a grand parade, a loggers’ show, a high school operetta, crafts and flower exhibits, dances, music, and the Ditchwalkers Clam and Spaghetti Dinner. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First Ascent of Shishapangma (1964)


First Ascent of Shishapangma (1964)

Located in south-central Tibet near the border of Nepal, Shishapangma is the fourteenth highest mountain in the world and the lowest of the eight-thousanders—peaks in the Himalayan and Karakoram mountain ranges that exceed a height of 8,000 m (26,247 ft). Scaled in 1964, it was the last eight-thousander to be climbed because China imposed severe travel restrictions on foreigners at the time. It is considered one of the easiest eight-thousanders to summit; nevertheless, how many have died trying? More… Discuss

The History of Auto Racing


The History of Auto Racing

Automobile racing originated in France in 1894, almost immediately after the construction of the first successful petrol-fueled autos, and it appeared in the US the following year. Open-road races were banned in France in 1903, however, after they led to 8 fatalities. Today, there are several different categories of racing. In open-wheel, stock-car, and other types of circuit auto races, flags are displayed to communicate instructions to competitors. What does a black flag signify? More… Discuss

best classical music , Schubert Symphony No 5 B flat major Bavarian RSO Maazel


Schubert Symphony No 5 B flat major Bavarian RSO Maazel

Image of the day: Charles Lindbergh



Charles Lindbergh
Charles Lindbergh works on engine of ‘The Spirit of St. Louis’ in 1927.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.BRGmW7M3.dpuf

word: pompous


pompous

Definition: (adjective) Characterized by excessive self-esteem or exaggerated dignity.
Synonyms: overblown, grandiloquent, portentous
Usage: He read the proclamation aloud in a pompous voice, although nobody was paying attention. Discuss.

Noam Chomsky in conversation with Jonathan Freedland


Noam Chomsky in conversation with Jonathan Freedland

Must read: Ebola in Liberia: According to Dr. Kwan Kew Lai’s Blog


Today is the Feast of St. Kew, a little known Welsh saint, probably of the fifth century. She was the sister of a hermit called Docco who founded a monastery at or near the village of St. Kew which is now in Cornwall, England. Nothing much is known about her except that she was able to cause some wild boars to obey her, this ability caught the attention of her said brother who condescended to finally speak to her. Why they were not on speaking terms to begin with was a mystery.What is in a name? Kew is my given name. It would be unheard of to have a saint with my name especially someone from Asia. My daughter, Cara, was told by her Confraternity Christian Development (CCD) teacher that everyone has a saint who bears his or her name. She searched in vain for a saint with her name.

via Ebola in Liberia.

***featured on by NPR: The Ebola Diaries: Trying To Heal Patients You Can’t Touch http://n.pr/1EaPxUw

Richard Strauss: Don Quixote op. 35 (1897), Mistislav Rostropovich, Seiji Ozawa, Saito Kinen Orch. ,great compositions/performances


Richard Strauss: Don Quixote op. 35 (1897)

D octor Who: “the fat just walks away” Myth and all myths of loosing fat effortlessly: consumer beware!


Doctor Who – Season 4 – Episode 1 – “Partners in Crime” – Trailer [HD]

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 9

1567   Lord Darnley, the second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, is murdered his sick-bed in a house in Edinburgh when the house blows up.
1799   The USS Constellation captures the French frigate Insurgente off the West Indies.
1825   The House of Representatives elects John Quincy Adams, sixth U.S. President.
1861   Jefferson F. Davis is elected president of the Confederate States of America.
1864   Union General George Armstrong Custer marries Elizabeth Bacon in their hometown of Monroe, Mich.
1904   Japanese troops land near Seoul, Korea, after disabling two Russian cruisers.
1909   France agrees to recognize German economic interests in Morocco in exchange for political supremacy.
1916   Conscription begins in Great Britain as the Military Service Act becomes effective.
1922   The U.S. Congress establishes the World War Foreign Debt Commission.
1942   Chiang Kai-shek meets with Sir Stafford Cripps, the British viceroy in India.
1943   The Red Army takes back Kursk 15 months after it fell to the Germans.
1946   Stalin announces the new five-year plan for the Soviet Union, calling for production boosts of 50 percent.
1951   Actress Greta Garbo gets U.S. citizenship.
1953   The French destroy six Viet Minh war factories hidden in the jungles of Vietnam.
1964   The U.S. embassy in Moscow is stoned by Chinese and Vietnamese students.
1978   Canada expels 11 Soviets in spying case.
1994   Nelson Mandela becomes the first black president of South Africa.
Born on February 9
1773   William Henry Harrison, ninth U.S. President and the first to die in office.
1814   Samuel Tilden, philanthropist.
1819   Lydia E. Pinkham, patent-medicine maker and entrepeneur.
1846   William Maybach, German engineer, designed the first Mercedes automobile.
1871   Howard T. Ricketts, pathologist.
1874   Amy Lowell, poet.
1880   James Stephens, Irish writer (The Charwoman’s Daughter, The Crock of Gold).
1909   Dean Rusk, Secretary of State under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson.
1923   Brendan Behan, Irish playwright and poet (The Hostage, The Quare Fellow).
1944   Alice Walker, Pulitzer prize winning author (The Color Purple).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.EIt8nuuR.dpuf

quotation: “…Let every nation know…” – John F. Kennedy


Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, or oppose any foe, to assure the survival and the success of liberty.John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) Discuss

CHOPPED LAMB WITH ONIONS AND SHEEP BUTTER – Neacsu Marius


CHOPPED LAMB WITH ONIONS AND SHEEP BUTTER

quotation: Washington Irving


Who can look down upon the grave even of an enemy, and not feel a compunctious throb, that he should ever have warred with the poor handful of earth that lies moldering before him?Washington Irving (1783-1859) Discuss

Harper Lee to Publish Second Novel


Harper Lee to Publish Second Novel

Harper Lee has announced that she will publish her second novel in 2015, a sequel of sorts to her beloved, Pulitzer Prize-winning To Kill a Mockingbird. Lee completed the manuscript, titled Go Set a Watchman, in the 1950s, but her editor persuaded her to more fully explore the childhood of the book’s main character, Scout, which resulted in To Kill a Mockingbird—until now, her only novel. Lee, now 88, became reacquainted with the manuscript when her lawyer came upon it last year. More… Discuss

todays’ holiday: Sri Lanka National Day (2015)


Sri Lanka National Day (2015)

The former British colony of Ceylon changed its name in 1972 to Sri Lanka, which means “Blessed Isle.” Sri Lankans commemorate the granting of their independence from Great Britain on February 4, 1948, with public gatherings throughout the island and special services in the temples, churches, and mosques. There are also parades, folk dances, processions, and national games. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Confederate States of America Established (1861)


Confederate States of America Established (1861)

Although Abraham Lincoln had stated his willingness to tolerate slavery where it currently existed, his election as US president precipitated the secession of several Southern states. South Carolina, the first to secede, was soon followed out of the Union by Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas. On February 4, 1861, delegates from the seceding states met in Alabama to organize a provisional government. Who was elected president of the Confederate States of America? More… Discuss

George Enescu – Rapsodia Romana Nr. 1 (completa) dirijor Sergiu Celibidache , great compositions/performances


George Enescu – Rapsodia Romana Nr. 1 (completa) dirijor Sergiu Celibidache

Mozart – Alla Turca – Turkish March (60 Minutes Version)


Mozart – Alla Turca – Turkish March (60 Minutes Version)

Published on Jul 17, 2014/214,439

Rondo Alla Turca by Mozart in a 60 minutes rendition from a very rare LP recording featuring piano and orchestra with a repetition of the piece for more than 10 times. This version of the Alla Turca, also known as the Turkish March is the only one accompanied by a symphony orchestra with a more soothing and deep sound of this true master piece by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

The melodic lines in the orchestra are more in the style of Beethoven & Tchaikovsky than Mozart, and remind a little bit of the James Bond Theme, but the concept of the piece is originally followed. Let’s say that this is a modern version of the Turkish March enhanced with the rich orchestral sound.

Enjoy and relax while listening to this really long and calming version of Rondo alla Turca, which can be used for various occasions like music for healing, reading, homework, learning, relaxing, stress relief and even for a musical ambiance if you have some guests at home and when doing any other useful things as well.

Thanks for watching Alla turca by Mozart and if you like it, please subscribe to this channel, for more innovative & enjoyable music like this to come soon!

Tags: Mozart, Turkish March, Alla Turca, Rondo, Original, Long version, 60 minutes, Wolfgang, Amadeus, Austria, Salzburg, Piano, Orchestra, Piano Sonata No. 11, Relaxing, Stress relief, famous, classical music, concentration, learning, study, zen, music for healing, reading, Моцарт, Турецкий марш, Türkische Marsch, Marsz Turecki, Türk Marşı

Festivalul Cetelor de Feciori Fagaras 2015


Festivalul Cetelor de Feciori Fagaras 2015

Holy See to UN: stop ignoring attacks on Christian women, girls


via Holy See to UN: stop ignoring attacks on Christian women, girls

Young women walk along a street in Bangalore, India. Credit: Hillary Mast/CNA.

from CNA: Holy See to UN: stop ignoring attacks on Christian women, girls (click to access article)