Tag Archives: Atlanta

Clogs


Clogs

Clogs are shoes or sandals that are made entirely of wood or have wooden soles and leather uppers. They are associated with the Netherlands and Sweden, where they are considered part of the national dress. In England, clogs were traditionally made of alder and were commonly worn by all classes throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. The Lancashire cotton mill workers habitually wore clogs to avoid slipping on the wet floors in the cotton mills. How are clogs used in some styles of dance? More… Discuss

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Today’s Birthdays in Music Wednesday, June 3rd 2015


Today’s Birthdays in Music

Birthdays in Music for Wednesday 3rd June 2015

Birthdays 1 – 57 of 57

1657 – Manuel de Egues, composer
1660Johannes Schenck, Dutch born composer, born in Amsterdam, The Netherlands (Baptism date)
1738 – Johann Christoph Oley, composer
1746 – James Hook, composer
1750 – Frederic Thieme, composer
1773 – Michael Gottard Fischer, composer
1801 – Frantisek Jan Skroup, composer
1819 – Thomas Ball, US, sculptor/painter/singer
1828 – Jean Alexander Ferdinand Poise, composer
1828 – Jose Inzenga y Castellanos, composer
1829 – Alfonse Charles Renaud de Vilback, composer
1832 – Alexander Charles Lecocq, composer
1841 – Eduardo Caudella, composer
1844 – Emile Paladilhe, composer
1867 – Bela Anton Szabados, composer
1868 – Lvar Henning Mankell, composer
1887 – Emil Axman, composer
1888 – Tom Brown, American musician (d. 1958)
1897 – Memphis Minnie, rocker
1904 – Jan Peerce, [Jacob Pincus Perelmuth], tenor (NY Met Opera), born in NYC, New York
1906 – Josephine Baker, American dancer/Parisian night club owner (Folies-Bergere) in St. Louis, Missouri (d. 1975)
1907 – Antonio Emmanvilovich Spadavecchia, composer
1922 – Ivan Patachich, composer
1924 – Jimmy Rogers, Ruleville, Mississippi, Blues musician (Muddy Waters’ Band), (d. 1997)
1926 – Carlos Veerhoff, composer
1926 – Janez Maticic, composer
1927 – Boots Randolph, Paducah KY, saxophonist (Yakety Sax)
1930 – Dakota Staton, American jazz singer (d. 2007)
1931 – Francoise Arnoul, actress/composer (French Cancan, Jacko & Lise)
1932 – Dakota Staton, [Rabia Aliyah], US jazz singer (In the Night)
1935 – Ted Curson [Theodore], Jazz Trumpeter, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (d. 2012)
1939 – David Frederick Stock, composer
1942 – Anita Harris, singer/actress (Follow that Camel)
1942 – Curtis Mayfield, rock vocalist (Freddie’s Dead, Superfly), born in Chicago, Illinois
1943 – Mike Dennis, rocker (Dovells)
1944 – Michael Clarke, rock drummer (Byrds-Turn! Turn! Turn!), born in NYC, New York
1946 – Eddie Holman, rocker
1946 – Ian Hunter, England, rocker (Mott the Hoople-All the Young Dudes)
1947 – Mickey Finn, British guitarist and percussionist (T. Rex) (d. 2003)
1949 – Stephen Ruppenthal, composer
1950 – Suzi Quatro[cchio], singer (Stumblin’)/actress (Happy Days), born in Detroit, Michigan
1951 – Deniece Williams, [Chandler], IN, singer (Love Wouldn’t Let Me Wait)
1954 – Dan Hill, rocker (Sometimes When We Touch)
1956 – Danny Wilde, rocker (Rembrandts)
1964 – Kerry King, American musician (Slayer)
1964 – Doro Pesch, German singer
1965 – Mike Gordon, American musician
1965 – Jeff Blumenkrantz, American composer and actor
1968 – Samantha Sprackling, Nigerian singer
1969 – Hiroyuki Takami, Japanese musician
1970 – Esther Hart, Dutch singer
1970 – Julie Masse, French Canadian singer
1970 – Peter Tägtgren, Swedish musician (Hypocrisy) and producer

Singer Kelly JonesSinger Kelly Jones (1974)

1974 – Kelly Jones, Welsh singer (Stereophonics)
1976 – Yuri Ruley, American drummer
1978 – Lyfe Jennings, R&B singer and song-writer
1987 – Lalaine, American actress and singer

today’s holiday: Parentalia (2015)


Parentalia (2015)

This was an ancient Roman festival held in honor of the manes, or souls of the dead—in particular, deceased relatives. It began a season for remembering the dead, which ended with the Feralia on February 21. This week was a quiet, serious occasion, without the rowdiness that characterized other Roman festivals. Everything, including the temples, closed down, and people decorated graves with flowers and left food—sometimes elaborate banquets—in the cemeteries in the belief that it would be eaten by the spirits of the deceased. More… Discuss

picture of the day: Abraham Lincoln ratifies The Thirteenth Amendment



The Thirteenth Amendment
On February 1, 1865 Lincoln’s home state of Illinois became the first to ratify the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery throughout the United States. President Abraham Lincoln had issued the Emancipation Proclamation two years earlier, but it had not effectively abolished slavery in all of the states–it did not apply to slave-holding border states that had remained with the Union during the Civil War. After the war, the sentiment about blacks was mixed even among anti-slavery Americans: some considered Lincoln’s address too conservative and pushed for black suffrage, arguing that blacks would remain oppressed by their former owners if they did not have the power to vote. After the amendment was passed, the Freedmen’s Bureau was created to help blacks with the problems they would encounter while trying to acquire jobs, education and land of their own.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day?podMonth=2&podDay=1&pod=GO#sthash.l1mr06rn.dpuf

Valentina Lisitsa si pianul fermecat: Rachmaninoff Rhapsody on theme of Paganini Lisitsa Baltic Youth Philharmonic Berlin Philharmonie , great compositions/performances


Great Compositions/performances:

Rachmaninoff Rhapsody on theme of Paganini Lisitsa Baltic Youth Philharmonic Berlin Philharmonie

CRUX: 2014: The year in review in Catholicism


2014 snapshot

 

Musical Jewels: Glenn Gould talks about J S Bach: make music part of your life series (i#make music part of your life series)


Glenn Gould talks about J S Bach

this day in the yesteryear: Rosa Parks Refuses to Give Up Her Seat (1955)


Rosa Parks Refuses to Give Up Her Seat (1955)

Dubbed the “Mother of the Modern-Day Civil Rights Movement” by the US Congress, Rosa Parks was an African-American civil rights activist who became famous in 1955 for refusing to vacate her seat on a municipal bus for a white man. This act of civil disobedience sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which launched Martin Luther King, Jr., into prominence and became one of the largest and most successful movements against racial segregation. How many thousands of commuters took part in the boycott? More… Discuss

just a thought: “the reality of a conspiracy is that it stays a theory!”


just a thought:  “the reality of a conspiracy is that it stays a theory!” –George-B

Evangelical <b>Conspiracy</b> <b>Theories</b> by Gary Ellis

Jasmine


Jasmine

Jasmine—also known as jessamine—is a genus of shrubs and vines in the family Oleaceae. It has about 300 species native to all continents except North America. Jasmine is prized for its very fragrant white or yellow blossoms, which, when dried, can be used to flavor tea. Jasmine oil is popular for perfumes and aromatherapy, even though jasmine flowers are too delicate to be distilled in the same way as true essential oils. Jasmine is thus called an “absolute” oil. What is Sampaguita? More… Discuss

Special Report: Traffickers use abductions, prison ships to feed Asian slave trade— Special Reports


Possible Mass Anthrax Exposure at CDC Labs (loosing the grip on reality?)


Possible Mass Anthrax Exposure at CDC Labs

As many as 75 scientists working in US federal government laboratories in Atlanta, Georgia, may have been accidentally exposed to live anthrax bacteria after staff members at a high-level facility failed to follow proper procedures to inactivate the deadly bacteria before sending the samples to lower-level labs for experimentation. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, under whose watch the breach occurred, is now investigating the incident and is offering antibiotic treatment and vaccines to those who might have been exposed. More… Discuss

Blue Skies (gypsy jazz) – Gonzalo Bergara Quartet with Leah Z on vocals – Steve’s Live Music


[youtube.com/watch?v=qHqz_AeiyEg]
Gypsy Jazz with the right balance of vocals and hot instrumentals, and above all rock steady driving rhythm. Thanks to Charlie and Steve for bringing this group through Atlanta.

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THE CRYPT OF CIVILIZATION


The Crypt of Civilization

Sealed in a chamber on the grounds of Oglethorpe University in Atlanta, Georgia, is an elaborate time capsule called the Crypt of Civilization. Inspired by the lack of information about ancient civilizations, university President Thornwell Jacobs devised the crypt in 1935 and spent the next five years deciding what to put in it. Likely the world’s first time capsule, it was sealed in 1940 and is slated be reopened in the year 8113. What items were selected to be stored in the crypt? More… Discuss