Tag Archives: Atlantic Ocean

make music part of your life series: Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy String Quartet No. 6 in F minor, Op. 80



 

pod-0520Amelia Earhart Flies Across the Atlantic Ocean On May 20, 1932.

Amelia Earhart lands near Londonderry, Ireland, to become the first woman fly solo across the Atlantic. In this June 21, 1932 photo, President Herbert Hoover is shown presenting the gold medal of the National Geographic Society to Earhart in Washington DC. , in recognition of her solo flight. Photo: Library of Congress – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.CaXwBnLB.dpuf

 


Itzhak Perlman – Sarasate, Spanish Dances op.22 no.1 Romanza Andaluza

Picture of the day: Sinking of the Lusitania


Sinking of the Lusitania

During the second year of WWI, the British Cunard ocean liner Lusitania , on a voyage from New York to Liverpool, sank off the coast of Ireland in only 18 minutes after being struck by a torpedo fired by the German U-boat U-20. Of 1,959 passengers and crew, 1,195 died. Of the fatalities, 123 were Americans. Even though the Germans maintained the liner was carrying arms purchased in America to Britain, the sinking of a passenger ship aroused intense anger against the German policy of unrestricted submarine warfare and hastened America’s entrance into the war.

Photo: U.S. Naval Historical Center

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.xSZJtze5.dpuf

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today’s birthday: Athanasius Kircher (1601?)


Athanasius Kircher (1601?)

One of history’s great polymaths, Kircher was a German archeologist, mathematician, biologist, astronomer, musicologist, and physicist who knew Hebrew, Aramaic, Coptic, Persian, Latin, Greek, and various modern languages. He tried to decipher one of the most ancient writing systems—Egyptian hieroglyphics—but most of his thoughts on the subject proved incorrect. An avid inventor, he built playful devices including a talking and eavesdropping statue that used a primitive intercom, and what else? More… Discuss

quotation: “…Let every nation know…” – John F. Kennedy


Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, or oppose any foe, to assure the survival and the success of liberty.John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) Discuss

Quotation: Ignorance… is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it. George Eliot


Ignorance… is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Environment: Plastics Pervade Planet’s Oceans


Plastics Pervade Planet’s Oceans

The world’s oceans are clogged with 269,000 tons of plastic objects, according to a new report by a group of marine researchers. The estimate is based on data from 24 expeditions over six years, during which they studied gyres—regions with extremely strong currents—in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans. When a large plastic object is introduced into the ocean, it often gets sucked into the whirling currents of a gyre. These objects are then eroded into “microplastics.” According to the researchers, these particles account for more than 90 percent of the plastic in the ocean. More… Discuss

this pressed to celebrate Monkey Day #euzicasa: National Geographic: Images of Animals, Nature, and Cultures



Our Favorite Monkey Pictures

To celebrate Monkey Day, our photo editors selected heartwarming, illuminating pictures of the primates.

Photography

via National Geographic: Images of Animals, Nature, and Cultures.

this day in the yesteryear: Battle of the River Plate (1939)


Battle of the River Plate (1939)

In the early months of World War II, the German pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee had been seeking out and sinking British merchant ships, a practice known as commerce raiding. The British navy tracked down the German ship and engaged it near the River Plate, in what was the first major naval engagement of the war. Outgunned, the Germans sailed for Montevideo in the hopes of making repairs. Shortly thereafter, the captain, believing his forces to be outnumbered, made what decision? More… Discuss

Guide Dogs


Guide Dogs

Guide dogs are service dogs that have been specially trained to help the visually impaired safely navigate their environments. The first school for guide dogs was established by the German government after World War I to provide service dogs to blinded veterans. Schools now exist in several European countries and in the US, where the pioneer Seeing Eye, Inc., founded by Dorothy Harrison Eustis in 1929, is one of the best known. What breeds are most frequently trained to be guide dogs? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Thanksgiving (U.S.)


Thanksgiving (U.S.)

The first American Thanksgiving was entirely religious and took place on December 4, 1619, but most Americans think of the first “official” Thanksgiving as the one that took place at Plymouth Colony in October 1621, a year after the Pilgrims first landed on the New England coast. Today, Thanksgiving is a time for family reunions and traditions, most of which center around the preparation of an elaborate meal featuring turkey and a dozen or so accompanying dishes. The widespread sales that begin in stores the next day mark the start of the Christmas shopping season. More… Discuss

 

this day in the yesteryear: The Suez Canal Opens (1869)


The Suez Canal Opens (1869)

One of the world’s most heavily used shipping lanes, the Suez Canal extends 101 miles (163 km) from Port Said to the Gulf of Suez and connects the Red Sea with the Mediterranean Sea, allowing ships to sail directly between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean. After its completion in 1869, its ownership remained in French and British hands until Egypt nationalized it in 1956, setting off an international crisis, during which it was closed. What caused the next closure of the canal? More… Discuss

Prince Edward Island


Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a Canadian province situated in the Maritimes. It is the nation’s smallest province in both size and population, but it has Canada‘s highest population density. With its fertile, distinctive red soil and its agreeable climate, the island has become known as the Garden of the Gulf. Tourism and fishing contribute to the island’s economy, and there may be natural gas deposits beneath its eastern end. What Canadian author and PEI native set most of her novels there? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Uruguay Independence Day


Uruguay Independence Day

This national holiday commemorates the declaration of independence of Uruguay from Portuguese rule on this day in 1825. By 1828, Uruguay was officially autonomous. Patriotic ceremonies are held in the capital city of Montevideo, with speeches and the singing of the national anthem. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First Transatlantic Telegraph Sent (1858)


First Transatlantic Telegraph Sent (1858)

After the introduction of the working telegraph in 1839, the idea that countries and continents could be connected by a communications network became an exciting possibility. A working telegraph could transmit in mere minutes messages that had once taken weeks to deliver by sea. England and France were linked by submarine cable in 1850, but it took several attempts over the next eight years before a lasting connection could be maintained across the Atlantic. How long was this cable operational? More… Discuss

Atlantis


Atlantis

According to legend, Atlantis was an ancient island that long ago sank into the sea and was lost. Plato is the primary source of the legend, writing in his dialogues the Timaeus and the Critias of the flourishing Atlantean civilization and the island’s destruction 9,000 years before his time. Many have sought the missing island to no avail. While it likely never existed as Plato described, elements of his story may have been drawn from real events. What does he say sank Atlantis? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Bahamas Independence Day


Bahamas Independence Day

The Bahama Islands gained independence from Great Britain at 12:01 a.m. on this day in 1973. The islands had been a British colony for nearly 250 years, but are now a commonwealth, with their own prime minister and parliament. Businesses are closed on the tenth, a legal holiday, but festivities go on for a week with parades and celebrations. A fireworks display at Clifford Park in Nassau on July 10 tops off the celebrations. More… Discuss

In the News: Shipwreck Yields More than $1 Million in Gold


 In the News

 

Shipwreck Yields More than $1 Million in Gold

A marine salvage company has recovered nearly 1,000 ounces of gold worth $1.3 million from a historic shipwreck off the US east coast, but this is a mere fraction of what went down with the ship in 1857—and what the company will likely eventually raise from the depths. The ship was transporting an estimated 21 tons of gold ingots, coins, and raw gold as well as the personal wealth of its 477 passengers when it sank in a hurricane, contributing to the Panic of 1857, a US banking crisis. Discovered in 1988, the wreck was explored by a company that recovered some $40 million in gold before being driven off by lawsuits. More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: RMS TITANIC SINKS (1912)


 

RMS Titanic

RMS Titanic (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

RMS Titanic Sinks (1912)

The Titanic was a massive ocean liner that was thought to be virtually unsinkable. The ship was on its maiden voyage and carrying more than 2,200 passengers and crew when it struck an iceberg on April 14, 1912, and sank early the next morning. More than 1,500 lives were lost in the disaster. In 1985, a team led by Robert Ballard and Jean-Louis Michel located theTitanic’s wreck on the ocean floor and made a discovery that shed light on how the ship sank. What was it? More… Discuss
[youtube.com/watch?v=CsaDyavJo1U
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45 survivor accounts. The final moments of RMS Titanic.

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NEWS: FAMILY FINDS UNCLASSIFIED GIANT JELLYFISH


Family Finds Unclassified Giant Jellyfish

Jellyfish are frightening enough when they’re the size of a dinner plate, so imagine coming across one that is nearly as big across as a human adult is tall! A family walking on the beach in Tasmania last month found a 5-foot (1.5-meter) jellyfish that had washed ashore. Experts have yet to classify the species, which appears to be of the lion’s mane variety. These are not the largest jellyfish known to science. Cyanea arctica, which makes its home in the waters of the North Atlantic and the Arctic, can grow to be 10 feet (3 meters) across. More… Discuss

 

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Duo Palissandre – duo n°3 opus 31 2ème mouvement Antoine de Lhoyer


 

 

 

Edouard Manet: Harbour at Bordeaux, 1871

Edouard Manet: Harbour at Bordeaux, 1871 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Le duo de guitare Palissandre (Vanessa Dartier & Yann Dufresne) interprète le 2ème mouvement du Duo n°3 opus 31 de Antoine de Lhoyer en août 2013 au Petit Théâtre à Bordeaux (France)

 

 

 

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TREASURE-HUNTING FAMILY FINDS SUNKEN HOARD


Treasure-Hunting Family Finds Sunken Hoard

Family time for one Florida family means scouring the seas for sunken treasure, and this weekend, the Schmitts struck pay dirt, hauling up a hoard of gold worth an estimated $300,000 from the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. The treasure belonged to a convoy of 11 ships sunk in a hurricane off the coast of Florida in 1715. The state of Florida will be allowed to take possession of up to 20 percent of the haul for display in a state museum, and the remainder will be split between the family and the company that owns the rights to the wreck site. More… Discuss

 

ST. PIERRE AND MIQUELON


St. Pierre and Miquelon

The sole remnant of France’s once vast territory in North America, St. Pierre and Miquelon is an archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean south of the Canadian island of Newfoundland. France and Britain fought over control of the islands for centuries, until France finally retook them for good in 1814. The area was a hotbed of alcohol smuggling during the US prohibition era and has the odd distinction being the only place in North America where a guillotine was ever used. What is the “Mouth of Hell“? More… Discuss