Tag Archives: Aztec

Chocolate


Chocolate

Chocolate is prepared in a complex process from ground, roasted cacao beans. The Maya had a chocolate beverage perhaps as early as 900 BCE, and the Aztecs prized the cacao tree. In the 16th century, Montezuma II served Hernán Cortés a cacao-bean drink called xocoatl—”bitter water”—that Cortés then introduced to Europe. It became a fashionable drink there, and chocolate shops thrived, becoming centers of political discussion. When did London’s first chocolate shop open? More… Discuss

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Obsidian


Obsidian

Obsidian is a very shiny volcanic glass that is sometimes used as a semiprecious stone. Though it is formed by the rapid cooling of viscous lava, obsidian is only slightly harder than window glass. It is typically jet black, but the presence of hematite produces red and brown varieties, and tiny gas bubbles may create a golden sheen. Obsidian was used by Native Americans for weapons, implements, tools, and ornaments and by the ancient Aztecs and Greeks for mirrors. What is snowflake obsidian? More… Discuss

THE MOON RABBIT


The Moon Rabbit

While the Man in the Moon is a popular European myth, many other cultures tell the tale of the Moon Rabbit, whose contours they trace on the orb’s surface. In East Asian folklore, the Moon Rabbit mixes the elixir of immortality. In Aztec legends, the god Quetzalcoatl elevated a rabbit to the Moon as a show of gratitude after the rabbit offered himself up as food. Native Americans tell of a rabbit riding the Moon. Who famously agreed in 1969 to look out for the Chinesebunny girl” on the Moon? More… Discuss