Tag Archives: Bach

happy birthday Bach: Willem van Twillert plays Bach, Dorische Toccata BWV 538, Deaken/Marcussen-organ Goes [NL]


happy birthday Bach!

Willem van Twillert plays Bach, Dorische Toccata BWV 538, Deaken/Marcussen-organ Goes [NL]

 

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Bach – Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565, great compositions/performances


Bach – Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major: Complete; Original Instruments, Voices of Music, great compositions/performances


Bach – Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major: Complete; Original Instruments, Voices of Music 4K UHD

Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring: make music part of your life


Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

Bach / I Musici, 1965: Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B flat major, BWV 1051: make music part of your life series


Bach / I Musici, 1965: Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B flat major, BWV 1051- Complete

Bach Busoni Chorale Prelude BWV 639 “Ich ruf zu dir Herr Jesu Christ”- VAlentina Lisitsa: great compositions/performances


Bach – Busoni: Chorale Prelude BWV 639 Ich ruf zu dir Herr Jesu Christ

Rostropovich plays the Sarabande from Bach’s Cello Suite # 1: great compositions/performances


Rostropovich plays the Sarabande from Bach’s Cello Suite # 1

J. S BACH ● BWV 645 ● Wachet Auf ! Sleepers Awake: make music part of your life series


J. S BACH ● BWV 645 ● Wachet Auf ! Sleepers Awake

Johann Sebastian Bach: Cantata #68, Aria “My heart ever faithful” BWV 68 (make music part of your life series)


 

 

 

 

 

make music part of your life series: Bach / I Musici, 1965: Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G Major, BWV 1049


[youtube.com/watch?v=i5EOSjV0Vkw]

Bach / I Musici, 1965: Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G Major, BWV 1049 

From the LP shown above, issued on the Philips label in 1965.

I. Allegro (0:01)
II. Andante (7:22)
III. Presto (11:51)

Die Brandenburgischen Konzerte sind eine Gruppe von sechs Konzerten von Johann Sebastian Bach (BWV 1046–1051). Sie sind dem Markgrafen Christian Ludwig von Brandenburg-Schwedt (1677–1734) gewidmet, den Bach im Winter 1718/1719 in Berlin kennengelernt hatte. Im September 1721 schickte er ihm die Partitur mit einer umfangreichen Widmung. Der Titel Brandenburgische Konzerte wurde von Philipp Spitta in seiner 1873–1879 entstandenen Bach-Biografie geprägt und hat sich heute allgemein durchgesetzt. Bachs Originaltitel lautet „Six Concerts Avec plusieurs Instruments”. Die sechs Konzerte weisen eine hohe stilistische und strukturelle Vielfalt auf. In ihrer Mischung der verschiedensten historischen und zukunftsweisenden Elemente bilden sie eine ganz persönliche und trotzdem allgemeingültige Ausdrucksform.

Les concertos brandebourgeois sont un ensemble de six concertos de Johann Sebastian Bach (BWV 1046 à 1051), qui comptent parmi les plus renommés qu’il ait composés. Le qualificatif de brandebourgeois est dû à Philipp Spitta qui, suivant l’usage germanique, fait référence au dédicataire, le margrave Christian Ludwig de Brandebourg.

great compositions/performances: Johann Sebastian Bach – Fantasy and fugue in G minor BWV 542


[youtube.com/watch?v=-Br08w4qd80]

Johann Sebastian Bach – Fantasy and fugue in G minor BWV 542

Franz Hauk at the Great Klais Organ of Liebfrauenmünster Ingolstadt

*****From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia*****
The Great Fantasia and Fugue in G minor, BWV 542, is an organ prelude and fugue by Johann Sebastian Bach. It acquired that name to distinguish it from the earlier Little Fugue in G minor, which is shorter. This piece is not to be confused with the Prelude and Fugue in A minor, which is also for organ and also sometimes called “the Great”.

It was transcribed for piano by Franz Liszt as S.463.

Robert Huw Morgan plays Bach’s Fantasia and Fugue in G minor on the Fisk-Nanney organ at the Stanford Memorial Church in Stanford, California.

 

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Choral from Cantata No.147 (Jesu bleibet meine Freunde) by Johann Sebastian Bach. Conducted by Nikolaus Harnoncourt.


[youtube.com/watch?v=3Mn1ibFdXDU]

Bach – BWV 147 – 7 – Jesus bleibet meine Freude

Choral from Cantata No.147 by Johann Sebastian Bach. Conducted by Nikolaus Harnoncourt.

High Quality: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Mn1ib…

Jesus bleibet meine Freude,
Meines Herzens Trost und Saft,
Jesus wehret allem Leide,
Er ist meines Lebens Kraft,
Meiner Augen Lust und Sonne,
Meiner Seele Schatz und Wonne;
Darum lass ich Jesum nicht
Aus dem Herzen und Gesicht.

1 – Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben http://youtube.com/watch?v=wraO_FOpFJ4
2 – Schäme dich, o Seele, nicht http://youtube.com/watch?v=QgLmLuRSDl8 
3 – Bereite dir, Jesu, noch itzo die Bahn http://youtube.com/watch?v=hIDRf-YlQVc
4 – Wohl mir, daß ich Jesum habe http://youtube.com/watch?v=3jFxeO63fj8
5 – Hilf, Jesu, hilf http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ae9trX3jKX4
6 – Ich will von Jesu Wundern singen http://youtube.com/watch?v=bKrsqh-H5YU

 

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Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring


[youtube.com/watch?v=3jGbQfIXh44&feature=c4-overview&list=UU6sujip0vq_jTW69yQkKS2w]

Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring is the most common English title of the 10th and last movement of the cantata Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben, BWV 147 (“Heart and Mouth and Deed and Life”), composed by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1716 and 1723. Written during his first year in Leipzig, Germany, this chorale movement is one of Bach’s most enduring works.

Jesu, joy of man’s desiring,

Holy wisdom, love most bright;

Drawn by Thee, our souls aspiring

Soar to uncreated light.

Word of God, our flesh that fashioned,

With the fire of life impassioned,

Striving still to truth unknown,

Soaring, dying round Thy throne.

Through the way where hope is guiding,

Hark, what peaceful music rings;

Where the flock, in Thee confiding,

Drink of joy from deathless springs.

Theirs is beauty’s fairest pleasure;

Theirs is wisdom’s holiest treasure.

Thou dost ever lead Thine own

In the love of joys unknown.

Enjoy, It’s all good!

 

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Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring



Culture Studies: Classical Music: Bach
(A series of well-known classical music pieces one should known about.)

Bach, Johann Sebastian (1685-1750)
Style/Period: Late German Baroque (w/eclectic German, French & Italian elements); German, Leipzig-based from 1723

Bach Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

 

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Brilliant Music: Bach – Cantata BWV 140 – Peter Schreier – Sleepers wake


Bach – Cantata BWV 140Peter Schreier – Sleepers wake

Zion hoert die Waechter singen 
Conductor: Karl Richter
Tenor: Peter Schreier
Orchestra: Munich Bach Choir, Munich Bach Orchestra
Sleepers Wake

from wikipedia

Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Awake, calls the voice to us), BWV 140, also known as Sleepers Wake, is achurch cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the 27th Sunday afterTrinity and first performed it on 25 November 1731. It is based on the hymn “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme” (1599) by Philipp Nicolai. Movement 4 of the cantata is the base for the first of Bach’s Schübler Chorales, BWV 645. The cantata is a late addition to Bach’s cycle of chorale cantatas, featuring additional poetry for two duets of Jesus and the Soul which expand the theme of the hymn.

History and text

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the 27th Sunday after Trinity. This Sunday occurs only when Easter is extremely early.[1] The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle to the Thessalonians, be prepared for the day of the Lord (1 Thessalonians 5:1–11), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1–13).[2] The chorale cantata is based on the Lutheran hymn in three stanzas, “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme” of Philipp Nicolai, which is based on the Gospel.[1] Bach composed the cantata to complete his cycle of chorale cantatas which he had begun in 1724.[3][4] The text of the three stanzas appears unchanged in movements 1, 4 and 7, while an unknown author supplied poetry for movements 2 and 3, 5 and 6, both a sequence ofrecitative and duet.[5] He refers to the love poetry of the Song of Songs, showing Jesus as the bridegroom of the Soul.[3] According to Christoph Wolff, the text was already available when Bach composed his cycle of chorale cantatas.[6]

Bach performed the cantata only once, in Leipzig’s main church Nikolaikirche on 25 November 1731.[3] According toChristoph Wolff, Bach performed it only this one time, although the 27th Sunday after Trinity occurred one more time during his tenure in Leipzig, in 1742.[1] He used movement 4 of the cantata as the base for the first of his Schübler Chorales, BWV 645.[6]

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J.S.Bach: Variatio 25 from Goldberg Variations (Catrin Finch, harp)


[youtube.com/watch?v=Jtm8zfUlFdE]

J.S.Bach: Variatio 25 from Goldberg Variations (Catrin Finch, harp)

J.S.Bach: Variatio 25 from Goldberg Variations 
Catrin Finch, harp

The tale of how the variations came to be composed comes from an early biography of Bach by Johann Nikolaus Forkel:
[For this work] we have to thank the instigation of the former Russian ambassador to the electoral court of Saxony, Count Kaiserling, who often stopped in Leipzig and brought there with him the aforementioned Goldberg, in order to have him given musical instruction by Bach. The Count was often ill and had sleepless nights. At such times, Goldberg, who lived in his house, had to spend the night in an antechamber, so as to play for him during his insomnia. … Once the Count mentioned in Bach’s presence that he would like to have some clavier pieces for Goldberg, which should be of such a smooth and somewhat lively character that he might be a little cheered up by them in his sleepless nights. Bach thought himself best able to fulfill this wish by means of Variations, the writing of which he had until then considered an ungrateful task on account of the repeatedly similar harmonic foundation. But since at this time all his works were already models of art, such also these variations became under his hand. Yet he produced only a single work of this kind. Thereafter the Count always called them his variations. He never tired of them, and for a long time sleepless nights meant: ‘Dear Goldberg, do play me one of my variations.’ Bach was perhaps never so rewarded for one of his works as for this. The Count presented him with a golden goblet filled with 100 louis-d’or. Nevertheless, even had the gift been a thousand times larger, their artistic value would not yet have been paid for.
Forkel wrote his biography in 1802, more than 60 years after the events related, and its accuracy has been questioned. The lack of dedication on the title page of the “Aria with Diverse Variations” also makes the tale of the commission unlikely. Goldberg’s age at the time of publication (14 years) has also been cited as grounds for doubting Forkel’s tale, although it must be said that he was known to be an accomplished keyboardist and sight-reader. In a recent book-length study, keyboardist and Bach scholar Peter Williams contends that the Forkel story is entirely spurious.
The aria on which the variations are based was suggested by Arnold Schering not to have been written by Bach. More recent scholarly literature (such as the edition by Christoph Wolff) suggests that there is no basis for such doubts.
After a statement of the aria at the beginning of the piece, there are thirty variations. The variations do not follow the melody of the aria, but rather use its bass line and chord progression.
Variation 25 is the third and last variation in G minor; a three-part piece, it is marked adagio in Bach’s own copy and is in 3/4 time. The melody is written out predominantly in 16th and 32nd notes, with many chromaticisms. This variation generally lasts longer than any other piece of the set.
Wanda Landowska famously described this variation as “the black pearl” of the Goldberg Variations. Peter Williams writes that “the beauty and dark passion of this variation make it unquestionably the emotional high point of the work”, and Glenn Gould said that “the appearance of this wistful, weary cantilena is a master-stroke of psychology.” In an interview with Gould, Tim Page described this variation as having an “extraordinary chromatic texture”; Gould agreed: “I don’t think there’s been a richer lode of enharmonic relationships any place between Gesualdo and Wagner.”

For many years Catrin has delighted audiences with her performances in the UK and worldwide. Inspired to learn the harp at the age of five, her rise to prominence started almost immediately, achieving the highest mark in the UK for her Grade VIII exam at the age of nine. She studied with Elinor Bennett for eight years before entering the Purcell School. Catrin graduated from the Royal Academy of Music in 2002 where she studied with Skaila Kanga and received the Queen’s Award for the most outstanding student of her year. More about Catrin Finch: http://www.catrinfinch.com
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J.S. Bach / Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern, BWV 1 (Harnoncourt)



Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Cantata BWV 1: Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern (25 March 1725)

1. Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern (Chorus)
2. Du wahrer Gottes und Marien Sohn (Recitative: T) 09:36
3. Erfüllet, ihr himmlischen göttlichen Flammen (Aria: S) 10:33
4. Ein irdscher Glanz, ein leiblich Licht (Recitative: B) 15:43
5. Unser Mund und Ton der Saiten (Aria: T) 16:42
6. Wie bin ich doch so herzlich froh (Chorale) 24:04

Soloists:
Boy Soprano: Soloist of the Wiener Sängerknaben 
Tenor: Kurt Equiluz 
Bass: Max van Egmond

Performed by the Wiener Sängerknaben & Chorus Viennensis (Chorus Master: Hans Gillesberger), and Concentus Musicus Wien under the direction of Nikolaus Harnoncourt. Recorded by Teldec in 1970.

“Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern (How brightly gleams the morning star) (BWV 1), composed for the Festival of the Annunciation (25th March) 1725, is the last chorale of the Year II cycle, since texts in the customary form follow from Easter onward. Bach’s unknown librettist has retained the outer verses, 1 and 7, of Philipp Nikolai’s well-known hymn (1599) in their original wording, but rewritten the inner verses as recitatives and arias. Nikolai’s hymn is only loosely connected with the Gospel reading for the day, the story of the Annunciation (Luke 1, 26-38). The last verse can most likely be interpreted as referring to the coming of the Saviour, and Bach’s librettist has woven further allusions into the second movement. Yet the profound feeling and ‘bridal’ character of the hymn well suit the subject of the festival. 

“The cantata has an unusual instrumental clothing; whereas the wind, with two horns and two oboes da caccia, emphasize the middle register only, the treble register is supplied by two concertante violins, in whose figurative playing the glittering of the ‘morning star’ is reflected. The opening chorus is a standard example of the form most frequently used in the chorale cantatas: the hymn melody, stated in long notes by the soprano (+ Horn I) with counter-points in the other choral parts, is built line by line into an independent orchestral texture.

“The recitatives, mainly set in syllabic declamation, are contrasted with the concertante, joyful agitation of the two arias, in which again instruments characteristic of the cantata’s orchestration are given prominence: oboe da caccia in the third movement, concertante violins with solo-tutti contrasts in the fifth. The simple setting of the final chorale is enriched by the independent part for the second horn.” – Alfred Dürr

Painting: Easter Morning, Caspar David Friedrich

 

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Bach – Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 In F Major, BWV 1046


The Brandenburg concertos by Johann Sebastian Bach (BWV 1046–1051, original title: Six Concerts à plusieurs instruments) are a collection of six instrumental works presented by Bach to Christian Ludwig, margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt, in 1721 (though probably composed earlier). They are widely regarded as among the finest musical compositions of the Baroque era.

Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F major, BWV 1046

Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Helmut Muller-Bruhl

Title on autograph score: Concerto 1mo à 2 Corni di Caccia, 3 Hautb: è Bassono, Violino Piccolo concertato, 2 Violini, una Viola è Violoncello, col Basso Continuo.
Allegro
Adagio
Allegro
Menuet – Trio I – Menuet da capo – Polacca – Menuet da capo – Trio II – Menuet da capo

Instrumentation: two corni da caccia, three oboes, bassoon, violino piccolo, and two violins, viola, cello, and basso continuo.

This concerto is the only one in the collection with four movements. An earlier version (Sinfonia, BWV 1046a) which does not use the violino piccolo was used for the opening of cantata BWV 208. This version lacks the third movement entirely, and the Polacca from the final movement, leaving Menuet – Trio I – Menuet – Trio II – Menuet. The first movement can also be found as the sinfonia of the cantata Falsche Welt, dir trau ich nicht, BWV 52. The third movement was used as the opening chorus of cantata BWV 207.

 

J.S. Bach – Brandenburg Concerto No.4 in sol-major BWV 1049


1. Allegro   00:00 
2. Andante  07:17
3. Presto  12:42

Johann Sebastian Bach (Eisenach, Thuringia, March 21. / March 31, 1685 – Leipzig, July 28, 1750) was an organist, harpsichordist and composer of Baroque music German member of a family of musicians most extraordinary of history, with more than 35 famous composers and many outstanding performers. 
His reputation as an organist and harpsichordist was legendary, famed throughout Europe. Apart from the organ and harpsichord, also played the violin and the viola da gamba as well as being the first great improviser renowned music. 
His prolific work is considered the pinnacle of Baroque music. He was distinguished for his intellectual depth, technical perfection and artistic beauty, and also for the synthesis of various international styles of his time and of the past and unparalleled extension. Bach is considered the last great master of the art of counterpoint, which is the source of inspiration and influence to later composers and musicians from Mozart through Schoenberg, until today.

 

J.S. Bach French Suite No.5 in G Major BWV 816 Svetlana Ponomareva piano



Extract from Svetlana Ponomareva plays Schnittke / Bach CD
Recorded in 2008 at CBC Studio One in Vancouver yet never played on CBC Radio 2

For those who do not care about musical name dropping and want to listen to a fine and informed articulation of the French Suite No.5

(Finally available for download, “Touching a Mystery” the book on rules of articulation for Baroque Clavier Music:
http://ponomarevapianist.com/news.php… )

This CD commemorates Alfred Schnittke‘s 10th passing anniversary. The selected “Five Aphorisms” written in 1990 and Sonata No. 3 written in 1992 are among his late works for piano solo, rarely performed. Svetlana’s performing of Schnittke solo piano is among the finest.

The CD also focuses on Bach’s music as the result of Svetlana’s serious work based on several in-depth researches by Alexandrov, Teregulov and Nosina from Russia on Baroque music – in particular, about articulation in Bach’s Clavier music and the symbolism of his music. Svetlana chose the Prelude and Fugue BWV 849 from the Well Tempered Clavier book 1 and the French Suite No. 5 BWV 816 to illustrate this research and demonstrate how through the rules of articulation the polyphony is serving a complex dramaturgy that is both true to the epoch -in style- and still quite personal to the performer.

http://ponomarevapianist.com/music_de…

 

J.S. Bach – Brandenburg Concerto No.5 in re-major BWV 1050


Johann Sebastian Bach ( Eisenach , Thuringia , March 21 . / March 31, 1685 – Leipzig , July 28, 1750 ) was an organist , harpsichordist and composer of Baroque music German member of a family of musicians most extraordinary of history, with more than 35 famous composers and many outstanding performers .
His reputation as an organist and harpsichordist was legendary , famed throughout Europe. Apart from the organ and harpsichord , also played the violin and the viola da gamba as well as being the first great improviser renowned music .
His prolific work is considered the pinnacle of Baroque music . He was distinguished for his intellectual depth , technical perfection and artistic beauty, and also for the synthesis of various international styles of his time and of the past and unparalleled extension . Bach is considered the last great master of the art of counterpoint, which is the source of inspiration and influence to later composers and musicians from Mozart through Schoenberg , until today.

 

Bach Notebook for Anna Magdalena Concerto die liebe Minuet in G major, BWV114



Bach Notebook for Anna Magdalena Concerto die liebe Minuet in G major, BWV114

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 † 1750)
Work: Minuet No.1 in G major (Anna Magdalena Notebook II/1), BWV Anh.114 Anna Magdalena Bach Clavier-Büchlein

J.S. Bach – Harpsichord or (Organ) Concerto in d minor, BWV 1059 / Ton Koopman, organ



Johann Sebastian Bach (1685~1750)
Konzert für Clavier, Streicher und Basso Continuo d-moll, BWV 1059
(incomplete work, revision by Ton Koopman version)
I. Sinfonia (from cantata, BWV 35: Sinfonia) – 00:00
II. Aria (from cantata, BWV 35: “Gott hat alles wohlgemacht”) – 05:18
III. Sinfonia: presto (from cantata, BWV 35: Second Sinfonia) – 08:59
Ton Koopman (orgel)
Ku Ebbinge (oboe da caccia)
The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
Ton Koopman (conductor)
*Clavier(Keyboard): harpsichord, clavichord, claviorganum, or organ etc.* 
 Concerto in d minor, BWV 1059 (incomplete) – 

Fragment consisting of 9 bars(only the first 9 bars survive in Bach’s own hand). Taken from the opening Sinfonia of the Cantata, BWV 35 “Geist und Seele wird verwirret” (1726) In the cantata, Bach uses an obbligato organ not only in the two sinfonias (which evidently form the first and last movements of a lost instrumental concerto, possibly for Oboe) but also in the aria No. 1, whose siciliano character likewise points to its original function as a concerto movement. Bach intended to write this out as a harpsichord concerto but abandoned the endeavor after only 9 bars. Continue reading

Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major, BWV 1068, Air – J. S. Bach



Title: Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major, BWV 1068, 2. Air.

Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach.
Artist: Neville Marriner, Academy Of St Martin In The Fields.

Painting by Jacob Philipp Hackert.

“Toccata and Fugue in D minor” , BWV 565, Johann Sebastian Bach, Organ: Karl Richter.


Toccata and Fugue in D minor” , BWV 565, Johann Sebastian Bach,
Organ: Karl Richter

J. S. Bach – Gigue from Suite in e-minor for lute BWV 996 played by Arvid Graeber


John Williams, Chaconne – complete


Guitarist John Williams performing Bach’s Chaconne. Recorded live at the MacMillan Theatre, University of Toronto, 1987

Jwcrdba86.jpg
John Williams live concert in Cordoba, 1986
Background information
Born 24 April 1941 (age 71)
Melbourne, Australia
Genres Classical musicRock Music
Occupations Guitaristarranger and composer.
Instruments Guitar
Years active fl. ca. 1958 – present
Labels Sony Records
Website www.JohnWilliamsGuitarNotes.com
Notable instruments
Smallman guitarPaulino Bernabe II, Ignacio Fleta, Hernandez y Aguado, Gibson Les Paul, Didgeridoo

 

Biography

 

John Williams was born on 24 April 1941 in Melbourne, Australia to an English father, Len Williams, who was later the founder of the London Guitar School, and Malaan (née Ah Ket), an Australian-Chinese mother (a daughter of Melbourne barrister William Ah Ket). In 1952, the family relocated to England. Williams was taught initially by his father and educated at the Friern Barnet Grammar School, London.[1] From the age of eleven he attended summer courses with Andrés Segovia at the Academia Musicale Chigiana in Siena, Italy. Later, he attended the Royal College of Music in London from 1956 to 1959, studying piano because the school did not have a guitar department at the time. Upon graduation, he was offered the opportunity to create such a department. He took the opportunity and ran the department for its first two years. Williams has maintained links with the college (and with the Royal Northern College of Music[2] in Manchester) ever since.

 

Classical guitarist

 

Williams’s first professional performance was at the Wigmore Hall in London on 6 November 1958. Since then, he has been performing throughout the world and has made regular appearances on radio and TV. He has recorded almost the entire repertoire for the guitar and has extended it by commissioning guitar concertos from composers such as Stephen DodgsonAndré PrevinPatrick GowersRichard Harvey and Steve Gray. He has recorded albums of duets with fellow guitarists Julian Bream and Paco Peña.

 

Williams is a visiting professor and honorary member of the Royal Academy of Music[3] in London.

 

Williams mostly uses Greg Smallman guitars after using Spanish Fleta during the 1970s [4] He also plays a guitar by Paulino Bernabe II.[5]

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>(More HERE)