Tag Archives: baltic sea

today’s holiday: Denmark Constitution Day


Denmark Constitution Day

This public holiday commemorates the constitution signed on June 5, 1849, that made Denmark a constitutional monarchy, and the one signed on June 5, 1953, that created parliamentary reforms. A parade takes place in Copenhagen, and other festivities are held in villages throughout Denmark. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Kaspar Hauser (1812)


Kaspar Hauser (1812)

In 1828, a teenage boy appeared in Nuremberg, Germany, carrying a letter that stated he had been placed in the care of the anonymous author as an infant. This caretaker claimed to have taught the boy reading, writing, and religion but never let him leave the house. The boy barely spoke but confirmed that he had been kept in a dark prison hole. In the following years, he sustained several mysterious injuries, and he was fatally stabbed in 1833. Who is thought to have been behind his death? More… Discuss

Today’s Picture: January 1, 1892, after two years of construction, the U.S. Immigration Service opened Ellis Island in New York Harbor



On January 1, 1892, after two years of construction, the U.S. Immigration Service opened Ellis Island in New York Harbor, a new facility for ‘processing’ immigrants. Formerly used as a munitions dump and landfill, Ellis Island was designed, its architects claimed, to handle more than 8,000 newcomers a day. Orderly lines funneled bewildered immigrants past doctors and officials who examined them for signs of disease. The physically and mentally ill were refused admittance, forcing thousands of families to make the difficult decision to return home with a relative refused entry or push on without them. A final brusque interview by an immigration official determined whether the newcomers had already been promised jobs. About 80 percent of those who entered Ellis Island received landing cards permitting them to board ferries for New York City. In the 1890s, 75 percent of all immigrants entered the United States through Ellis Island. – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.yUdRynY2.dpuf

this pressed: Tiny Baltic States Prepare to Hit Back at Mighty Russia


RTR4BK9D

A jet fighter from the Su-30 SM “Sokoly Rossii” (Falcons of Russia) aerobatic team performs during a show in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, October 25, 2014. Ilya Naymushin/Reuters

Earlier this month, a Russian warship entered Latvia’s exclusive economic zone, some nine nautical miles from the country’s territorial waters. Considering that Russian warships have already approached Latvian waters some 50 times this year, according to figures from Latvia’s Ministry of Defence, it was not an altogether unsurprising visit. Russian military planes, meanwhile, have come close to Latvian airspace some 200 times this year. Latvia’s defence minister Raimonds Vejonis tells Newsweek at his office in Riga, that his country is prepared should its mighty neighbour to the east decide to invade: “We have special plans of action. Working with the Ministry of Interior, we conduct exercises to train our troops and policemen for different scenarios. But of course we need more co-operation with our neighbours and our Nato allies as well.”

via Tiny Baltic States Prepare to Hit Back at Mighty Russia.

this day in the yesteryear: Treaty of Fredrikshamn Signed (1809)


Treaty of Fredrikshamn Signed (1809)

In the 17th century, Sweden was a major European power and controlled most of the Baltic coast. However, its expansion in the Baltic Sea coastlands antagonized Russia, Denmark-Norway, and Saxony-Poland, which formed an anti-Swedish coalition. The resultant Great Northern War cost Sweden much of its territory and marked the emergence of Russia as a major power. After Russia and Sweden clashed again in the 19th century, the 1809 Treaty of Fredrikshamn forced Sweden to cede all of what country? More… Discuss

Gulf Dead Zone Roughly the Size of Connecticut


Gulf Dead Zone Roughly the Size of Connecticut

Human activities have created a “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico that is roughly the size of the state of Connecticut—about 5,000 square miles (13,000 sq km). Though this is several thousand square miles smaller than it was at its peak, it remains the second-largest dead zone in the world. Dead zones develop when there is insufficient oxygen near the ocean floor to support marine life. In most cases, this results from an overgrowth of algae fed by excessive nutrient runoff from farming and other human activities. More… Discuss

WARMER SEAS HARBOR SICKENING BACTERIA


Warmer Seas Harbor Sickening Bacteria

Scientists say warmer seas are responsible for the emergence of a gastroenteritis-causing group of bacteria in northern Europe and outbreaks elsewhere in the world. They found that every year that the Baltic Sea’s surface temperature rose one degree, the number of Vibrioinfections in the area rose by nearly 200 percent. These bacteria are generally found in tropical marine environments but are spreading in areas that are warming, and the Baltic Sea in particular has been warming at an unprecedented rate. Vibrio outbreaks have also been recorded in Chile, Peru, Israel, the northwestern US, and northwestern Spain and have been linked to warming in these regions. More…