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make music part of your life series: Ludwig van Beethoven – Piano Concerto No.3 in C minor – Op. 37


[youtube.com/watch?v=Ld5jftIL2RY]

The Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37, was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1800 and was first performed on 5 April 1803, with the composer as soloist. The year for which the concerto was composed (1800) has however been questioned by contemporary musicologists. It was published in 1804. During that same performance, the Second Symphony and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also premiered. The composition was dedicated to Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia.

Movements:

I. Allegro con brio 00:00
II. Largo 15:54
III. Rondo. Allegro 25:31

The first primary theme is reminiscent of that of Mozart‘s 24th Piano Concerto.
The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in E-flat, 2 trumpets in C, timpani, strings and piano soloist.

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58 (Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy)



***Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58
***Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia OrchestraEugene Ormandy: ***conductor-1962

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, was composed in 1805–1806, although no autograph copy survives. It is scored for solo piano and an orchestra consisting of a flute, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. Like many classical concertos, it has three movements:

  1. Allegro moderato
  2. Andante con moto (in E minor)
  3. Rondo (Vivace)

Premiere and reception

It was premiered in March 1807 at a private concert of the home of Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz. The Coriolan Overture and the Fourth Symphony were premiered in that same concert.[1] However, the public premiere was not until 22 December 1808 in Vienna at the Theater an der Wien. Beethoven again took the stage as soloist. This was part of a marathon concert which saw Beethoven’s last appearance as a soloist with orchestra, as well as the premieres of the Choral Fantasy and the Fifth and Sixth symphonies. Beethoven dedicated the concerto to his friend, student, and patron, the Archduke Rudolph.

A review in the May 1809 edition of the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung states that “[this concerto] is the most admirable, singular, artistic and complex Beethoven concerto ever”.[2] However, after its first performance, the piece was neglected until 1836, when it was revived by Felix Mendelssohn. Today, the work is widely performed and recorded, and is considered to be one of the central works of the piano concerto literature.

 

 

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Ludwig van Beethoven – Piano Concerto No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 – Daniel Barenboim, piano


The painting is described thus: "Ludwig v...

The painting is described thus: “Ludwig van Beethoven was recognised as a child prodigy. He worked at the age of 13 as organist, pianist/harpsichordist and violist at the court in Bonn, and had published three early piano sonatas. This portrait in oils is the earliest authenticated likeness of Beethoven.” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


ABOUT THE PIANO CONCERTOS BY BEETHOVEN

Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, op. 15

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, op. 15, was written during 1796 and 1797. The first performance was in Prague in 1798, with Beethoven himself playing the piano, dedicated to his student Babette Countess Keglevics.

Although this was Beethoven’s first piano concerto to be published, it was, in fact, his third attempt at the genre, following an unpublished piano concerto in E-flat major (not to be confused with Beethoven’s more famous “Emperor” concerto, also in E-flat) and the Piano Concerto No. 2, published after Piano Concerto No. 1 (in 1801) but composed almost ten years earlier.    More: 

Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major, Op. 19

The Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major, Op. 19, by Ludwig van Beethoven was composed primarily between 1787 and 1789, although it did not attain the form it was published as until 1795. Beethoven did write another finale for it in 1798 for performance in Prague, but that is not the finale that it was published with. It was used by the composer as a vehicle for his own performances as a young virtuoso, initially intended with the Bonn Hofkapelle. It was published in 1801, by which time he had also published the Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, although it had been composed after this work, in 1796 and 1797.
The B-flat major Piano Concerto became an important display piece for the young Beethoven as he sought to establish himself after moving from Bonn to Vienna. He was the soloist at its premiere on 29 March 1795, at Vienna’s Burgtheater in a concert marking his public debut.] (Prior to that, he had performed only in the private salons of the Viennese nobility.) While the work as a whole is very much in the concerto style of Mozart, there is a sense of drama and contrast that would be present in many of Beethoven’s later works. Beethoven himself apparently did not rate this work particularly highly, remarking to the publisher Franz Anton Hoffmeister that, along with the Piano Concerto No. 1, it was “not one of my best.” The version that he premiered in 1795 is the version that is performed and recorded today.   More:.. 

Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37

The Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37, was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1800 and was first performed on 5 April 1803, with the composer as soloist. During that same performance, the Second Symphony and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also debuted.[1] The composition was dedicated to Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia. The first primary theme is reminiscent of that of Mozart’s 24th Piano Concerto.
The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in E-flat, 2 trumpets in C, timpani, strings and piano soloist.   More:…

ABOUT BEETHOVEN

Ludwig van Beethoven ( /ˈlʊdvɪɡ væn ˈbeɪt.hoʊvən/; German pronunciation: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːt.hoːfən] ( listen); baptized 17 December 1770[1] — 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras in Western art music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers.
Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven moved to Vienna in his early 20s, studying with Joseph Haydn and quickly gaining a reputation as a virtuoso pianist. His hearing began to deteriorate in his late twenties, yet he continued to compose, conduct, and perform, even after becoming completely deaf.       More:

ABOUT DANIEL BARENBOIM

Daniel Barenboim, KBE (born 15 November 1942) is an Argentine-born pianist and conductor. He has served as music director of several major symphonic and operatic orchestras and made numerous recordings.
Currently, he is general music director of La Scala in Milan, the Berlin State Opera, and the Staatskapelle Berlin; he previously served as Music Director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Orchestre de Paris. Barenboim is also known for his work with the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, a Sevilla-based orchestra of young Arab and Israeli musicians, and as an outspoken critic of the Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories.
Barenboim has received numerous awards and prizes, including Britain’s Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire, France’s Légion d’honneur both as a Commander and Grand Officier, the German Großes Bundesverdienstkreuz and Willy Brandt Award, and, together with the Palestinian-American scholar Edward Said, Spain’s Prince of Asturias Concord Award. He has won seven Grammy awards for his work and discography.
More:

We think of celebrations in terms of years while some of us forget what a celebration is about altogether, as the years begin  being heavy on  the shoulders…

I celebrate  Beethoven’s music with every moment. His music is to my mind, what air is to my being. His music is universal, his harmony is everywhere to be found, and I don’t even have to stop in my track to listen. Actually I can safely operate dangerous machinery, like a car for instance as a so called “road rage” antidote, and I don’t even need water to swallow it I’m just keeping my ears full of sound, and the eyes on the road (looks more like an parking lot, more and more at all times).  Music like the one composed by Beethoven helps one go to sleep each night, and wake up in the morning,  with a new sense of BEING.

I hope that you enjoy music too! I Hope you have  a very special,  musical, harmonious and inspired weekend! Hope this post helps a little!
(It helped me write this few words!)”

Alfred Brendel, Claudio Abbado – Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.3 / Bruckner: Symphony No.7 (2005) (great sound)



Alfred Brendel, piano 
Lucerne Festival Orchestra
Claudio Abbado, conductor

0h01’00” – 0h36’35”
LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
Piano Concerto No.3 in C minor, Op. 37
01:03 I. Allegro con brio
17:58 II. Largo
27:25 III. Rondo. Allegro

0h39’45” – 1h40’55”
ANTON BRUCKNER
Symphony No. 7 in E major
39:49 I. Allegro moderato
58:53 II. Adagio
1:19:32 III. Scherzo. Sehr schnell
1:28:56 IV. Finale. Bewegt, doch nicht schnell 

Recorded live in Lucerne at the Concert Hall of the Culture and Concention Centre, on 10-12 August 2005

The famed Concert Hall of Lucerne hosted its first public performance with the opening of the 1998 Lucerne International Music Festival. Situated on the picturesque Vierwaldstättersee shore, the facility is also known by the acronym of its German name, KKL (Kultur- und Kongresszentrum Luzern). It also contains a flexible performance and banquet space, the Lucerne Hall, as well as museum and exhibition space, meeting rooms, restaurants, and a rehearsal hall.

 Artec provided Design and Planning services covering Auditorium Acoustics Design and Background Noise and Vibration Control consulting for Culture and Congress Centre. The Architect for the facility was Jean Nouvel of Paris.