Tag Archives: Beethoven

Best Classical Music: Beethoven “Symphony No 8″ Karajan (London, 20.V.1955), great compositions/performances


Beethoven “Symphony No 8″ Karajan


Ludwig van Beethoven, Fidelio, Op. 72: Overture, Fidelio, Op. 72

Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77


Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77

Beethoven – 12 Variations on “Se vuol ballare” for violin and piano, WoO 40


Beethoven – 12 Variations on “Se vuol ballare” for violin and piano, WoO 40

Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert)


©Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert)

Beethoven – Gilels Piano Sonata No. 2


Beethoven – Gilels Piano Sonata
No. 2

Ludwig van Beethoven – Rondo in C major, Op. 51, No. 1


Ludwig van Beethoven – Rondo in C major, Op. 51, No. 1

Itzhak Perlman – Ludwig van Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D Op 61 – Daniel Barenboim


Itzhak Perlman – Beethoven Violin Concerto – Daniel Barenboim

Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 24 in F-sharp, op. 78 “À Thérèse” Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 24 in F-sharp, op. 78 “À Thérèse”, Daniel Barenboim

Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


© Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert)

Beethoven piano sonata no. 18, op. 31, in E flat major, Piano: Wilhelm Kempff , great compositions/performances


Beethoven piano sonata no. 18 op. 31 in E flat major

Beethoven: String Quartet No. 2 in G Major, Live in The Greene Space , great compositions/performances


Beethoven: String Quartet No. 2 in G Major, Live in The Greene Space

Beethoven – Turkish March (arr. for 8 pianos; Larrocha, Bolet, etc.) , great compositions/performances


Beethoven – Turkish March (arr. for 8 pianos; Larrocha, Bolet, etc.)

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.2 Op.19 in B flat major


Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Concerto No.2 Op.19 in B flat major

Beethoven “Moonlight” Sonata op 27 # 2 Mov 3 Valentina Lisitsa ,great compositions/performances


Beethoven “Moonlight” Sonata op 27 # 2 Mov 3 Valentina Lisitsa

Arturo Toscanini – Beethoven : Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major, Op. 60 , great compositions/performances


Arturo Toscanini – Beethoven : Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major, Op. 60


CARL MARIA VON WEBER.- Sinfonía Nº 1 en Do mayor Op. 19

BEETHOVEN Symphony No 6 (Pastoral) in F Op 68 LEONARD BERNSTEIN, great compositions/performances


BEETHOVEN Symphony No 6 (Pastoral) in F Op 68 LEONARD BERNSTEIN

Beethoven, Piano Concerto No. 2 Op. 19 in B flat major. Evgeny Kissin , make music pat of your life series


Beethoven, Piano Concerto No. 2 Op. 19 in B flat major. Evgeny Kissin

Valentina Lisitsa – Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata Op.27 No.2, great compositions/performances


Valentina Lisitsa – Moonlight Sonata Op.27 No.2 Mov.1,2,3 (Beethoven)

Beethoven | Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major | Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


Beethoven | Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major | Daniel Barenboim

Beethoven – Trio for Piano, Flute and Bassoon in G, WoO 37: great compositions/performances


Beethoven – Trio for Piano, Flute and Bassoon in G, WoO 37

Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert): great compositions/performances


 Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert)

Beethoven | Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26 | Daniel Barenboim: great compositions/performances


Beethoven | Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26 | Daniel Barenboim

Español: Sonata para Piano nº12 en La bemol Mayor, Op. 26

* 1st Movement (Andante con Variazioni)
* 2nd Movement (Scherzo, Allegro Molto)
* 3rd Movement (Marcia funebre sulla morte d’un Eroe)
* 4th Movement (Allegro)

Work: Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26
Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
Soloist: Daniel Barenhoim

Beethoven – Piano Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110, Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


Piano Sonata No. 31 – Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven – WoO 7 – 12 minuets for orchestra: make music part of your life series


Ludwig van Beethoven – WoO 7 – 12 minuets for orchestra

Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony no. 8 in F Major, Op 93: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony no.8 in F Major,  Op 93

Beethoven: Sonata cello & piano op. 102 nº 2. Rostropovich – Richter: great compositions/performances


Beethoven: Sonata cello & piano op. 102 nº 2. Rostropovich – Richter

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 15 in D major, op. 28, “Pastoral”- Daniel Barenboim: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 15 in D major, op. 28, “Pastoral”. Daniel Barenboim, piano

iesLudwig van Beethoven – Fidelio Overture, Op. 72b: make music part of your life series


Ludwig van Beethoven – Fidelio Overture, Op. 72b

Ludwig van Beethoven – 12 Variations on “See the Conqu’ring Hero comes” WoO 45: make music part of your life


Ludwig van Beethoven – 12 Variations on “See the Conqu’ring Hero comes” WoO 45

Beethoven – String Quartet Op.59, No.2 “Rasumovsky” – Végh Quartet – 1952: great compositions/performances


Beethoven – String Quartet Op.59, No.2 “Rasumovsky” – Végh Quartet – 1952

Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3, Op. 72, Kurt Masur: great compositions/perform


Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3, Op. 72, Kurt Masur

Beethoven – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker: make music part of your life series


Beethoven – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker

Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55):
Berliner Philharmoniker

Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55), is a landmark musical work marking the full arrival of the composer’s “middle-period,” a series of unprecedented large scale works of emotional depth and structural rigor.
The symphony is widely regarded as a mature expression of the classical style of the late eighteenth century that also exhibits defining features of the romantic style that would hold sway in the nineteenth century. The Third was begun immediately after the Second, completed in August 1804, and first performed 7 April 1805.
Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B flat, 2 bassoons, 3 horns in E flat, 2 trumpets in E flat and C, timpani in E flat and B flat, and strings.
Form
The piece consists of four movements:
1. Allegro con brio
2. Marcia funebre: Adagio assai in C minor
3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
4. Finale: Allegro molto

Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 6 in F major, op. 68 “Pastorale”: make music part of your life series



From: ChamberMusicTube ChamberMusicTube

Ludwig van BeethovenSymphony No. 6 in F major, op. 68 “Pastorale

From Wikipedia

The Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68, also known as the Pastoral Symphony (German Pastoral-Sinfonie[1]), is a symphony composed by Ludwig van Beethoven, and completed in 1808. One of Beethoven’s few works containing explicitly programmatic content,[2] the symphony was first performed in the Theater an der Wien on 22 December 1808[3] in a four hour concert.[4]

Form

The symphony has five movements, rather than the four typical of symphonies of the Classical era. Beethoven annotated the beginning of each movement as follows:

  1. Erwachen heiterer Empfindungen bei der Ankunft auf dem Lande (Awakening of cheerful feelings upon arrival in the countryside): Allegro ma non troppo

  2. Szene am Bach (Scene by the brook): Andante molto mosso

  3. Lustiges Zusammensein der Landleute (Merry gathering of country folk): Allegro

  4. Gewitter, Sturm (Thunder. Storm): Allegro

  5. Hirtengesang. Frohe und dankbare Gefühle nach dem Sturm (Shepherd’s song; cheerful and thankful feelings after the storm): Allegretto

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115: make music part of your life series


FROM:

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827)

Work: Namensfeier ‘Name-Day Celebration‘ Overture in C major, Op.115

Movement: Maestoso – Allegro assai vivace

Herbert von Karajan
Berliner Philharmoniker Orchestra

© Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (make music part of your life series)


© Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert)

Beethoven’s 5th Piano concert (Emperor) –
Daniel Barenboim p
iano

Det kongelige kapel – Michael Schønvandt i Danmarks Radio Koncerthuset 2009
Ved prisoverrækkelsen af Sonningprisen 2009 på 600,000 DKK ~ 125.000 US$ The Sonning Prize Award! The copyright © owner to all content in this video with The Royal Orchestra & Daniel Barenboim conducted by Michael Schønwandt, is Danmarks Radio! Also listen to Barenboims version of Noctune op. 27 no 2 by Chopin: http://www.youtube.com//watch?v=7EcER…

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 (make music part of your life series)


Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1, in G major, op. 40 

Igor Ozim, violin
Vienna Opera Orchestra
Moshe Atzmon

Beethoven’s reputation as a pianist often obscures the fact that he was a very capable violinist. Although not an accomplished master, he possessed a profound love for and understanding of the instrument, evident in his ten violin sonatas, the violin concerto, and numerous quintets, quartets, and other chamber works. The two Romances for violin stand out because they are single-movement works in concerto settings. The Romance in G major was published in 1803 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel in Leipzig; the date of its first performance is not known. Despite the lower opus number, it was composed at least five years after the Romance in F, Op. 50, which was published in 1805. He retained the early Classical orchestra he employed for his earlier Piano Concerto in B flat, Op. 19: one flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, and strings. Often described as a “preparation” for the Violin Concerto, Op. 61, of 1806, the Romance in G stands as a fine work in its own right, clearly demonstrating Beethoven’s mastery of the high-Classical style of Mozart and Haydn. Furthermore, Beethoven creates subtle connections between disparate sections of a work.

Cast in a two-episode rondo format (ABACA coda), the Romance in G is not imbued with sonata-form characteristics, as are many of Beethoven’s later rondo movements. The rondo theme (A) is in two parts, each performed first by the soloist then repeated by the orchestra. Descending sixteenth notes in the solo part mark the beginning of B, in which the orchestra is relegated to a purely accompanimental role, creating unity by including figures from the rondo. Section B spends a significant amount of time on the dominant (D major); however, this does not represent a modulation but a preparation for the return of the rondo in G major. Again, the soloist performs both segments of the A section alone, this time including a running eighth note accompaniment under each of the literally repeated themes. Beethoven set the second episode, C, in E minor. The minor mode, dotted rhythms, and staccato passages give the section a “gypsy” music tinge. The foray into a new key area ends with the return of the G major rondo theme, again played by the soloist, but with accompaniment by the orchestra. Beethoven forgoes the repetition of each of the two parts of the rondo and ends the work with a brief coda featuring a lengthy trill in the solo violin. The three fortissimo chords that close the piece seem oddly, possibly comically, out of place in this generally quiet work, but they do resemble the orchestral string parts at the end of each rondo section. [allmusic.com]

great compositions/performances: Artur Schnabel plays Beethoven Piano Sonata No.30, Op.109


Artur Schnabel plays Beethoven Piano Sonata No.30, Op.109

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Sonata No. 30 in E major, Op. 109, composed in 1820, is the antepenultimate of his piano sonatas. In it, after the huge Hammerklavier sonata, Op. 106, Beethoven returns to a smaller scale and a more intimate character. It is dedicated to Maximiliane Brentano, the daughter of Beethoven’s long-standing friend Antonie Brentano, for whom Beethoven had already composed the short piano trio in B flat major WoO 39 in 1812. Musically, the work is characterised by a free and original approach to the traditional sonata form. Its focus is the third movement, a set of variations that interpret its theme in a wide variety of individual ways.[1]

The three movements of this sonata are:

  • Vivace ma non troppo / Adagio espressivo, E major, 2/4 time
  • Prestissimo, E minor, 6/8 time
  • Gesangvoll, mit innigster Empfindung. Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo, E major, 3/4 time.

A performance lasts about twenty minutes, of which the third movement takes more than half. Overall, the sonata is endowed with abundant melody and interesting, complex harmony.[14](pp192–3)

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fabulous musical moments: Beethoven / Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in C Major, WoO 36, No. 3 – Amadeus Quartet


Beethoven / Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in C Major, WoO 36, No. 3 – Amadeus Quartet

In this 1969 recording, Christoph Eschenbach and members of the Amadeus Quartet — Norbert Brainin, violin; Peter Schidlof, viola; and Martin Lovett, cello — perform the Beethoven Piano quartet in C major, WoO 36 No. 3. I recorded this video from a cassette I purchased back in the early 1970s, issued on the Deutsche Grammophon label (serial number 3335 174-10).

Allegro vivace (0:08)
Adagio con espressione (6:10)
Rondo: Allegro (12:57)

More Beethoven:

-Beethoven / Gilels / Szell, 1968: Piano Concerto in G major, Op. 58 – Complete – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXoxpW…
-Leonid Hambro, 1970: “Happy Birthday Dear Ludwig” – Variations in The Style of Beethoven – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-Uga3…
-Fur Elise – Wilhelm Kempff: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9DSjo…
-Fur Elise – Alicia de Larrocha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFMUEe…
-Beethoven / Artur Balsam, 1952: Piano (Violin) Concerto in D major, Op. 61a – Movement 1 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKKCGw…
-David Oistrakh: Romance No. 2 in F major for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 50: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gz4JEY…-
-Wilhelm Backhaus: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 – London, 1950s, Karl Böhm: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRSTwj…
-Emil Gilels, 1968: Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 37 (Rondo) Beethoven – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeW79S…
-Emil Gilels, 1968: Piano Concerto in C major, Op. 15 (Rondo) Beethoven – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojL4Kx…
-Emil Gilels, 1983, Beethoven Klaviersonate Nr. 4 Es-dur, Op. 7 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEfGQ1…
-Stephen Kovacevich, 1975: Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 37, Movement 3 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYBM5z…
-Beethoven / Istomin-Stern-Rose Trio: Piano Trio in B flat major, Op. 97 – Archduke (Allegro), 1966: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQAswV…
-Solomon, 1958: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 – Rondo – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_Vi8m…
-Friedrich Gulda, 1954: Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 2, No. 1 (1) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RwDZs…
-Christoph Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in C Major, WoO 36, No. 3 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBp3jh…
-Artur Balsam: Piano (Violin) Concerto in D major, Op. 61 – Rondo, 1950s – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD8ul2…

great compsitions/performances: Sviatoslav Richter – Beethoven – Piano Sonata No 9 in E major, Op 14


Sviatoslav Richter – Beethoven – Piano Sonata No 9 in E major, Op 14

00:00 Allegro
06:39 Allegretto. Maggiore
12:53 Rondo. Allegro comodo

Sviatoslav Richter, piano

make music part of your life series: Ludwig van Beethoven – Piano Concerto No.3 in C minor – Op. 37


The Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37, was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1800 and was first performed on 5 April 1803, with the composer as soloist. The year for which the concerto was composed (1800) has however been questioned by contemporary musicologists. It was published in 1804. During that same performance, the Second Symphony and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also premiered. The composition was dedicated to Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia.

Movements:

I. Allegro con brio 00:00
II. Largo 15:54
III. Rondo. Allegro 25:31

The first primary theme is reminiscent of that of Mozart‘s 24th Piano Concerto.
The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in E-flat, 2 trumpets in C, timpani, strings and piano soloist.

make music part of your life: Alfred Brendel, Plays Ludwig van Beethoven’s – Rondo in G major Op. 51 No. 2


Ludwig van Beethoven – Rondo in G major Op. 51 No. 2

Alfred Brendel, Piano

great compositions/performances: Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nº 15 en Re mayor Opus 28 Pastoral. Daniel Barenboim, piano


Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nr. 15 en Re mayor Opus 28 Pastoral. Daniel Barenboim, piano

greaat compositions/performances: Beethoven's Sonata for piano Nr. 15 in D major Op. 28 "Pastorale"Daniel Barenboim -piano

great compositions/performances: Beethoven’s Sonata for piano Nr. 15 in D major Op. 28 “Pastorale“Daniel Barenboim -piano

make music part of your life series: Ludwig van Beethoven – Fidelio Overture, Op. 72b


make music part of your life series: Ludwig van BeethovenFidelio Overture, Op. 72b

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fidelio (Leonore, oder Der Triumph der ehelichen Liebe: Leonore, or The Triumph of Married Love)[1] (Op. 72) is a German opera with spoken dialogue in two acts by Ludwig van Beethoven. It is his only opera. The German libretto was prepared by Joseph Sonnleithner from the French of Jean-Nicolas Bouilly, which had been used for the 1798 opera Léonore, ou L’amour conjugal by Pierre Gaveaux, and the 1804 opera Leonora by Ferdinando Paer (a score of which was owned by Beethoven).

The opera tells how Leonore, disguised as a prison guard named “Fidelio”, rescues her husband Florestan from death in a political prison.

make music part of your life series: Beethoven – Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67 – Thielemann


Beethoven – Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67 – Thielemann

Ludwig van Beethoven
Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67

1 Allegro con brio
2 Andante con moto
3 Allegro
4 Allegro

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

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Extra, Extra, Extra! great compositions/performances: Exploding Beethoven: Tempest Sonata Live from Paris Valentina Lisitsa


Exploding Beethoven: Tempest Sonata Live from Paris Valentina Lisitsa

Watch at your own risk – I warned you :)
Live from Paris, Salle Gaveau , May 21, 2014.
Sonata Op 31 No.2 D Minor
Piano Pleyel 1892 provided by Regie Pianos
http://www.regiepianos.com/pianos_fic…

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historic musical moments: Beethoven – String Quartet No.6 in B flat major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


Beethoven – String Quartet No.6 in B flat major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952

Ludwig van Beethoven: The Early String Quartets, Opus 18
String Quartet No. 6 in B flat major, Op. 18, No. 6
(Streichquartett Nr. 6 in B-dur, Op. 18, Nr. 6)

I. Allegro con brio
II. Adagio ma non troppo
III. Scherzo. Allegro
IV. La Malinconia. Adagio – Allegretto quasi Allegro

Végh Quartet
Sándor Végh, 1st violin
Sándor Zöldy, 2nd violin
Georges Janzer, viola
Paul Szabo, violoncello

The 1952 Haydn Society Recordings

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Beethoven Piano Concerto n.3 op.37 – Kempff – Bernstein – NYP (Live 1966)


Beethoven Piano Concerto n.3 op.37 – Kempff – Bernstein – NYP (Live 1966)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Title page, first edition

The Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37, was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1800 and was first performed on 5 April 1803, with the composer as soloist. The year for which the concerto was composed (1800) has however been questioned by contemporary musicologists.[1][2] It was published in 1804. During that same performance, the Second Symphony and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also premiered.[3] The composition was dedicated to Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia. The first primary theme is reminiscent of that of Mozart’s 24th Piano Concerto.

The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in E-flat, 2 trumpets in C, timpani, strings and piano soloist.

As is standard for Classical/Romantic-era concertos, the work is in three movements:

  1. Allegro con brio
  2. Largo
  3. Rondo. Allegro

I. Allegro con brio

 
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This movement is known to make forceful use of the theme (direct and indirect) throughout.

Orchestral exposition: In the orchestral exposition, the theme is introduced by the strings, and used throughout the movement. It is developed several times. In the third section (second subject), the clarinet introduces the second main theme, which is in the relative major key, E-flat major.

Second exposition: The piano enters with an ascending scale motif. The structure of the exposition in the piano solo is similar to that of the orchestral exposition.

Development: The piano enters, playing similar scales used in the beginning of the second exposition, this time in D major rather than C minor. The music is generally quiet.

Recapitulation: The orchestra restates the theme in fortissimo, with the wind instruments responding by building up a minor ninth chord as in the exposition. For the return of the second subject, Beethoven modulates to the tonic major, C major. A dark transition to the cadenza occurs, immediately switching from C major to C minor.

Cadenza: Beethoven wrote one cadenza for this movement. The cadenza Beethoven wrote is at times stormy and ends on a series of trills that calm down to pianissimo.

Coda: Beethoven subverts the expectation of a return to the tonic at the end of the cadenza by prolonging the final trill and eventually arriving on a dominant seventh. The piano plays a series of arpeggios before the music settles into the home key of C minor. Then the music intensifies before a full tutti occurs, followed by the piano playing descending arpeggios, the ascending scale from the second exposition, and finally a resolute ending on C.

II. Largo

 
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The second movement, which is in E major, opens with the solo piano. The opening is marked with detailed pedalling instructions.

III. Rondo – Allegro

The finale is in a sonata rondo form. The movement begins in C minor with an agitated theme played only by the piano. The movement ends with a C major coda marked presto.

First performance

Cadenza of the first movement

The score was incomplete at its first performance. Beethoven’s friend, Ignaz von Seyfried, who turned the pages of the music for him that night, later wrote:[3]

I saw almost nothing but empty pages; at the most, on one page or another a few Egyptian hieroglyphs wholly unintelligible to me were scribbled down to serve as clues for him; for he played nearly all the solo part from memory since, as was so often the case, he had not had time to set it all down on paper.

 

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GreatCompositions/Performances: Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]


Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]

- Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]
- http://www.entre88teclas.es/atdr/robe…

 

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