Tag Archives: berlin philharmonic

make music part of your life series: , Ottorino Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances Suite III



O. Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances Suite III.

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

English: Ottorino Respighi, photography by Mad...

English: Ottorino Respighi, photography by Madeline Grimoldi at 1935 Deutsch: Ottorino Respighi, Fotografie von Madeline Grimoldi um 1935 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Ancient Airs and Dances (Italian: Antiche arie e danze) is a set of three orchestral suites by Italian composer Ottorino Respighi. In addition to being a renowned composer and conductor, Respighi was also a notable musicologist. His interest in Italian music of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries led him to compose works inspired by the music of these periods.

Suite No. 3 (1932)

Suite No. 3 was composed in 1932. It differs from the previous two suites in that it is arranged for strings only and somewhat melancholy in overall mood. It is based on lute songs by Besard, a piece for baroque guitar by Ludovico Roncalli, and lute pieces by Santino Garsi da Parma and additional anonymous composers.

  1. Italiana (Anonymous: Italiana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  2. Arie di corte (Jean-Baptiste Besard: Arie di corte (Sec.XVI) – Andante cantabile – Allegretto – Vivace – Slow with great expression – Allegro vivace – Vivacissimo – Andante cantabile)
  3. Siciliana (Anonymous: Siciliana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  4. Passacaglia (Lodovico Roncalli: Passacaglia (1692) – Maestoso – Vivace)
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Historic musical bits: Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic


 Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic

historic musical bits: Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin – Piano Concerto No 2 in F minor, Op 21/ London Symphony Orchestra André Previn, conductor Classical Vault 2 Classical Vault 2


Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin – Piano Concerto No 2 in F minor, Op 21

great compositions/performances: Claudio Abbado “Overture “The Fair Melusina” Mendelssohn


Claudio Abbado “Overture “The Fair Melusina” Mendelssohn

Rimsky-Korsakov – Fairy Tale (skazka), Op. 29 , great compositions/performances


Rimsky-Korsakov – Fairy Tale (skazka), Op. 29

Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra , great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra

Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 1 in E flat major, great compositions/performances


Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 1 in E flat major

Beethoven, Piano Concerto No. 2 Op. 19 in B flat major. Evgeny Kissin , make music pat of your life series


Beethoven, Piano Concerto No. 2 Op. 19 in B flat major. Evgeny Kissin

Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live): great compositions/performances


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

Sviatoslav Richter – Strauss – Burleske in D minor (1961),: great compositions/performances


Sviatoslav Richter – Strauss – Burleske in D minor

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 16 in D Major, K. 451 (Vladimir Ashkenazy),: great compositions/performances


Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 16 in D Major, K. 451 (Vladimir Ashkenazy)

Practicing for my Salle Pleyel recital…and a fashion lesson Valentina Lisitsa


Practicing for my Salle Pleyel recital…and a fashion lesson 🙂 Valentina Lisitsa

Stravinsky: Petrushka / Rattle · Berliner Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


[embes]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KOZzoSXrts[/embed]

Beethoven – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker: make music part of your life series


Beethoven – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker

Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55):
Berliner Philharmoniker

Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55), is a landmark musical work marking the full arrival of the composer’s “middle-period,” a series of unprecedented large scale works of emotional depth and structural rigor.
The symphony is widely regarded as a mature expression of the classical style of the late eighteenth century that also exhibits defining features of the romantic style that would hold sway in the nineteenth century. The Third was begun immediately after the Second, completed in August 1804, and first performed 7 April 1805.
Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B flat, 2 bassoons, 3 horns in E flat, 2 trumpets in E flat and C, timpani in E flat and B flat, and strings.
Form
The piece consists of four movements:
1. Allegro con brio
2. Marcia funebre: Adagio assai in C minor
3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
4. Finale: Allegro molto

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115: make music part of your life series


FROM:

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827)

Work: Namensfeier ‘Name-Day Celebration‘ Overture in C major, Op.115

Movement: Maestoso – Allegro assai vivace

Herbert von Karajan
Berliner Philharmoniker Orchestra

great compositions/performances: Schumann – Symphony No 1 in B flat major “Spring”, Op. 38 – VPO, Furtwängler, 1951 (Remastered 2012)


[youtube.com/watch?v=yp3OixIiJV0]

Schumann – Symphony No 1 in B flat major “Spring” Op. 38 – VPO, Furtwängler, 1951 (Remastered 2012)

Fabulous musical moments Schumann - Symphony No 1 in B flat major "Spring",  Op. 38 - VPO, Furtwängler, 1951 (Remastered 2012)

great compositions/performances:  Schumann – Symphony No 1 in B flat major “Spring”, Op. 38 – VPO, Furtwängler, 1951 (Remastered 2012)

great compositions/performances:  Schumann – Symphony No 1 in B flat major “Spring”, Op. 38 – VPO, Furtwängler, 1951 (Remastered 2012)

 

who’s who: Sayaka Shoji (庄司 紗矢香 Shōji Sayaka), Classical Violonist


Sayaka Shoji

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Sayaka Shoji in Strasbourg, February 2014.

Sayaka Shoji (庄司 紗矢香 Shōji Sayaka?, born 30 January 1983) is a Japanese classical violinist. She is the first Japanese and youngest winner (after Lenuta Ciulei) at the Paganini Competition in Genoa in 1999.

She was born into an artistic family (her mother is a painter, grandmother is a poet) and spent her childhood in Siena, Italy. She studied at Hochschule für Musik Köln under Zakhar Bron and graduated in 2004. Her other teachers have included Sashko Gawrillow, Uto Ughi and Shlomo Mintz.

Zubin Mehta has been her strong supporter. When Shoji auditioned for him in 2000, he immediately changed his schedule in order to make her first recording with the Israel Philharmonic possible in the following month, then invited her to perform with Bavarian State Opera and Los Angeles Philharmonic.

Since then many prominent orchestras have invited Shoji, including the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Berlin Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony, St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia and WDR Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Lorin Maazel, Yuri Temirkanov, Myung-whun Chung and Semyon Bychkov.

Discography

The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Conducted by Zubin Mehta
July 2000, Deutsche Grammophon
  • Louvre Recital
Itamar Golan, Piano
September 2001, Deutsche Grammophon
Itamar Golan, Piano
December 2003, Deutsche Grammophon
Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Conducted by Myung-Whun Chung
October 2005, Deutsche Grammophon
  • Beethoven Sonata 2&9
Gianluca Cascioli, Piano
2010 Deutsche Grammophon
  • Bach & Reger Solo Works
2011 Mirare

Sayaka Shoji records with Deutsche Grammophon and performs on the 1729 “Recamier” Stradivarius on loan from Ryuzo Ueno, Honorary Chairman, Ueno Fine Chemicals Industry, Ltd.

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Historic Musical Moments: Beethoven / Herbert von Karajan, 1952: Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93 – VPO, Entre LP


[youtube.com/watch?v=Soe8aJ3EAJk]

Beethoven / Herbert von Karajan, 1952: Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93 – VPO, Entre LP

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Legendary Performances: Schumann – Symphony No. 4 in D minor Op. 120 – Furtwängler, BPO, 1953 (Remastered 2012)


[youtube.com/watch?v=vk8AtH0t2BU]

 

Schumann – Symphony No. 4 in D minor Op. 120 – Furtwängler, BPO, 1953 (Remastered 2012)

 

Wilhelm Furtwängler conducts the Symphonies of Robert Schumann
Legendary Recordings LR002
Download this CD here- http://www.abbajustlikethat.comyr.com…
Robert Schumann – Symphony No. 4 in D minor Op. 120 (Revised 1851 version)
1. First Movement – Ziemlich langsam – Lebhaft 11:51
2. Second Movement – Romanze: Ziemlich langsam 05:20
3. Third Movement – Scherzo: Lebhaft 05:55
4. Fourth Movement – Langsam; Lebhaft 8:01
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler
Studio Recording, Berlin, May 14, 1953

Restoration notes –

Portrait of Wilhelm Furtwängler by Emil Orlik

Portrait of Wilhelm Furtwängler by Emil Orlik (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Widely considered to be the greatest recording of Schumann’s 4th symphony ever made, it is quite fortunate then that the original audio was quite good to begin with. I focused on reducing the harsh edge on the violins, trying to make them sound more natural, and giving a more rounded sound to the orchestra. The result is fantastic.

Audio Restored and Remastered by Rudolf Ondrich, 12-13 October 2012.

 

 

 

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Wagner -Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Prelude and Liebestod from ‘Tristan Und Isolde’ (Karajan-BPO-Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra)



From  the Author-DjangoMan1963:  “This is my personal vote for the greatest piece of music ever.
The version here is by the Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by the late, great Herbert Von Karajan.

The jewish coductor Daniel Barenboim aptly said: “The music is bigger than the man”. Anyone who dismisses Wagner’s music on the basis of his views as a man, is missing something truly wonderful.

I’ve chosen Karajan’s version because he gets the tempo and the feel just right. Not too much vibratro here, which other conductors sometimes bring to the piece, making it sound too overwrought. He gets it spot on. A touch of vibrato, but he let’s the notes speak for themselves, whilst the languid tempo evokes a mystical atmosphere to the piece.

I hope you enjoy this wonderful music.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Richard Wagner
Photo of Wagner

Tristan und Isolde (Tristan and Isolde, or Tristan and Isolda, or Tristran and Ysolt) is an opera, or music drama, in three acts by Richard Wagner to a German libretto by the composer, based largely on the romance by Gottfried von Straßburg. It was composed between 1857 and 1859 and premiered in Munich on 10 June 1865 with Hans von Bülow conducting. Wagner referred to the work not as an opera, but called it “eine Handlung” (literally a drama. a plot or an action), which was the equivalent of the term used by the Spanish playwright Calderón for his dramas.
Wagner’s composition of Tristan und Isolde was inspired by the philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer (particularly The World as Will and Representation) and his affair with Mathilde Wesendonck. Widely acknowledged as one of the peaks of the operatic repertory, Tristan was notable for Wagner’s unprecedented use of chromaticismtonality, orchestral colour and harmonic suspension.
The opera was inexorably influential among Western classical composers and provided direct inspiration to composers such as Gustav MahlerRichard StraussKarol SzymanowskiAlban BergArnold Schönberg and Benjamin Britten. Other composers like Claude DebussyMaurice Ravel and Igor Stravinsky formulated their styles in contrast to Wagner’s musical legacy. Many see Tristan as the beginning of the move away from common practice harmony and tonality and consider that it lays the groundwork for the direction of classical music in the 20th century.[1] Both Wagner’s libretto style and music were also profoundly influential on the Symbolist poets of the late 19th Century and early 20th Century.[2]

Composition history

Wagner was forced to abandon his position as conductor of the Dresden Opera in 1849, as there was a warrant posted for his arrest for his participation in the unsuccessfulMay Revolution. He left his wife, Minna, in Dresden, and fled to Zürich. There, in 1852, he met the wealthy silk trader Otto Wesendonck. Wesendonck became a supporter of Wagner and bankrolled the composer for several years. Wesendonck’s wife, Mathilde, became enamoured of the composer. Though Wagner was working on his epic Der Ring des Nibelungen, he found himself intrigued by the legend of Tristan and Iseult.

The re-discovery of mediæval Germanic poetry, including Gottfried von Strassburg‘s version of Tristan, the Nibelungenlied and Wolfram von Eschenbach‘s Parzival, left a large impact on the German Romantic movements during the mid-19th century. The story of Tristan and Isolde is a quintessential romance of the Middle Ages and theRenaissance. Several versions of the story exist, the earliest dating to the middle of the 12th century. Gottfried’s version, part of the “courtly” branch of the legend, had a huge influence on later German literature.[3]

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Schumann – Symphony No. 4 in D minor Op. 120 – Furtwängler, BPO, 1953 (Remastered 2012)



Wilhelm Furtwängler conducts the Symphonies of Robert Schumann
Legendary Recordings LR002
Download this CD here – http://www.abbajustlikethat.comyr.com…
Robert Schumann – Symphony No. 4 in D minor Op. 120 (Revised 1851 version)
1. First Movement – Ziemlich langsam – Lebhaft 11:51
2. Second Movement – Romanze: Ziemlich langsam 05:20
3. Third Movement – Scherzo: Lebhaft 05:55
4. Fourth Movement – Langsam; Lebhaft 8:01
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler
Studio Recording, Berlin, May 14, 1953

Restoration notes –

Wilhelm Furtwängler (timbre Berlin-Ouest / Bri...

Wilhelm Furtwängler (timbre Berlin-Ouest / Briefmarke Westberlin) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Widely considered to be the greatest recording of Schumann’s 4th symphony ever made, it is quite fortunate then that the original audio was quite good to begin with. I focused on reducing the harsh edge on the violins, trying to make them sound more natural, and giving a more rounded sound to the orchestra. The result is fantastic.

Audio Restored and Remastered by Rudolf Ondrich, 12-13 October 2012.”

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Light Cavalry Overture (Suppé) – Herbert von Karajan [HQ]


Leichte Kavallerie (Light Cavalry) is an operetta in three acts by Franz von Suppé, with a libretto by Karl Costa. It was first performed in the Carltheater, Vienna on 21 March 1866.

Herbert von Karajan was an Austrian orchestra and opera conductor. To the wider world he was perhaps most famously associated with the Berlin Philharmonic, of which he was principal conductor for 35 years. Although his work was not universally admired, he is generally considered to have been one of the greatest conductors of all time, and he was a dominant figure in European classical music from the 1960s until his death. Part of the reason for this was the large number of recordings he made and their prominence during his lifetime. By one estimate he was the top-selling classical music recording artist of all time, having sold an estimated 200 million records. File:Zentralfriedhof,Suppe,Franz,von.jpg