Tag Archives: Bob Dylan

Like a Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan’s


“How does it feel…To be all alone…

Like a complete unknown…

Like a rolling stone…”

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Don’t Think Twice It’s All Right – Bob Dylan


Don’t Think Twice It’s All Right – Bob Dylan

Bird on a wire-Perla Batalla_ Special_Features “I’m Your Man”


Leonard Cohen‘s Bird on The Wire:

The most beautiful interpretation of “Like The Bird On The Wire”, ever. Perla flies like a dove above all, off a wire up in the skies, and dive on the winds of the accordion, so divinely played. Perla Batalla is the priestess of freedom and joy of life everlasting in this magnificent scene: Sweet like nectar, and the salt of the Earth. If Leonard is the man, Perla is the woman, the lover, enchanter, charmer, the voice.

Like a bird on the wire
Like a drunk in a midnight choir
I have tried in my way to be free

Like a worm on a hook
Like a knight from some old fashioned book
I have saved all my ribbons for thee

If I, if I have been unkind
I hope that you can just let it go by
If I, if I have been untrue
I hope you know it was never to you

Oh, like a baby, stillborn
Like a beast with his horn
I have torn everyone who reached out for me

But I swear by this song
And by all that I have done wrong
I will make it all up to thee

I saw a beggar leaning on his wooden crutch
He said to me, “You must not ask for so much”
And a pretty woman leaning in her darkened door
She cried to me, “Hey, why not ask for more?”

Oh, like a bird on the wire
Like a drunk in a midnight choir
I have tried in my way to be free

Songwriters
COHEN, LEONARD

Published by
Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

today’s birthday: Wavy Gravy (1936)


Wavy Gravy (1936)

Born Hugh Romney, Wavy Gravy is a peace activist known for his whimsical hippie appearance and clown persona. After being repeatedly arrested at political demonstrations, he adopted his flamboyant look in the hopes that police officers would be less likely to arrest someone dressed as a clown. Gravy was a master of ceremonies during the first Woodstock Festival and the two subsequent events and is now the official clown of the Grateful Dead. Who gave him his unusual moniker? More… Discuss

Thinking of a song: Bob Dylan – I Pity The Poor Immigrant Great song and lyrics


I Pity the Poor Immigrant

thinking of a song: Leonard Cohen & U2 : Tower Of Song (I’m your man), QUOTE: “And all the bridges are burning that we might have crossed But I feel so close to everything that we lost We’ll never, we’ll never have to lose it again”


Leonard Cohen & U2 : Tower Of Song

Article-culture-music: Woody Guthrie


Woody Guthrie

Guthrie was an American folk musician best known for the song “This Land Is Your Land.” During the Great Depression of the 1930s, he lived a hobo’s life, traveling with his guitar and harmonica. Guthrie wrote or adapted more than 1,000 songs, often performing them at protest rallies, and became a successful radio personality and a hero to protest singers like Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. After his death, his daughter approached what singer to record songs with lyrics that Guthrie had written? More… Discuss

Woody Guthrie tribute – House of the rising sun

“Hello darkness, my old friend, I’ve come to talk with you again”: L. Cohen And Simon and Garfunkel: “the sound of silence”


Leonard Cohen – Sound of Silence (tribute to Paul Simon)

 

New Books: Mandy Aftel author of Fragrant: The Secret Life of Scent| Podomatic (I hope you’ll find the interview inspiring as I did!)


Fragrant:  The Secret Life of Scent Mandy Aftel

Mandy Aftel is widely acclaimed as a trailblazer in natural perfumery. Over two decades of sourcing the finest aromatic ingredients from all over the world and creating artisanal fragrances, she has been an evangelist for the transformative power of scent. In Fragrant, through five major players in the epic of aroma, she explores the profound connection between our sense of smell and the appetites that move us, give us pleasure, make us fully alive. The Avid Reader Show is sponsored by Wellington Square Bookshop in Chester County, PA. The show airs every Monday at 5PM EST. Please visit our website at http://www.wellingtonsquarebooks.com

 

today’s birthday: Billy the Kid (1859)


Billy the Kid (1859)

Billy the Kid, who went by the name William H. Bonney and whose real name may have been Henry McCarty, was an infamous outlaw and murderer who roamed the American West from his teenage years until his death at the age of 21. The young fugitive was captured and jailed several times but escaped each time until he was finally killed by Sheriff Pat Garrett. Although rooted in history, the story of Billy the Kid has developed into a popular legend. Why is his gravesite enclosed by a steel cage? More… Discuss

Joan Baez – Where Have All The Flowers Gone


[youtube.com/watch?v=MfUGjoSxK_M]

Joan Baez – Where Have All The Flowers Gone

 

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CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL GREATEST HITS


CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL GREATEST HITS

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JOAN BAEZ ~ I Pity The Poor Immigrant ~


I Pity The Poor Immigrant Lyrics

“I Pity The Poor Immigrant” is track #7 on the album John Wesley Harding. It was written by Bob Dylan

I Pity The Poor Immigrant Submit Correct LyricS

I pity the poor immigrant
Who wishes he would’ve stayed home
Who uses all his power to do evil
But in the end is always left so alone

That man whom with his fingers cheats
And who lies with every breath
Who passionately hates his life
And likewise, fears his death

I pity the poor immigrant
Whose strength is spent in vain
Whose heaven is like Ironsides
Whose tears are like rain

Who eats but is not satisfied
Who hears but does not see
Who falls in love with wealth itself
And turns his back on me

I pity the poor immigrant
Who tramples through the mud
Who fills his mouth with laughing
And who builds his town with blood

Whose visions in the final end
Must shatter like the glass
I pity the poor immigrant
When his gladness comes to pass

Songwriters
Bob Dylan

Read more: Bob Dylan – I Pity The Poor Immigrant Lyrics | MetroLyrics

 

The Byrds – Turn! & Rhymney & Mr.Tambourine Man – 10/29/65



COMPLETELY LIVE performance from “The Big…”, including David McCallum‘s intro!!

A very rare treat; as this is one of only TWO COMPLETELY LIVE performances that the “Original 5” ever did on TV.

On the Ed Sullivan show “Turn!” was live, but “Mr. Tambourine Man” was lip synched.

The original Byrds in all their glory, and their weaknessess, are on good display here.

Exciting because it’s all live, and also quite “Jagged” & “Stiff” sounding, as the “Original 5” was never known for their “Tight Live Act”, the primitive sound systems of the day notwithstanding.

Rough rythym section, Michael Clarke is playing the songs slow, Gene Clark is playing the tambourine without much sense of metre or time, etc.

In Gene’s defense, I would say that he resented the Tambourine, after getting “Stuck” with it when Crosby took the guitar out of hands.

EQUALLY wonderful are the AMAZING audience shots; capturing the fun, exuberance, and exhileration of a mid ’60’s rock concert.

That’s what I’m talkin’ about, baby.

This show was filmed on October 19, 1965, and was shown on TV in early 1966.

A VERY HUMOUROUS scene comes at 5:09. As the camera pans past all the girls faces, not knowing quite how to react to this song about a Welsh coal mining disaster, and ends on the face of a jealous boyfriend!

Capturing The Byrds at the peak of their affluence, this is a wonderful, live look at pop history.

 

“What’s Up?” : Sarah Jarosz, “1,000 Things”


Published on Oct 24, 2013

Sarah Jarosz and her band perform “1,000 Things” at the American Songwriter office.
Lyrics dugout @ http://sarahjarosz.com/lyrics/

1000THINGS Sarah Janosz

1000THINGS Sarah Janosz

Bob Dylan – Man Of Constant Sorrow



Bob Dylan’s first TV appearance in 1963.

History of this traditional American folk song. It was first recorded by Dick Burnett, a partially blind fiddler from Kentucky. “Man of Constant Sorrow” is a traditional American folk song first recorded by Dick Burnett, a partially blind fiddler from Kentucky. Although he song was originally recorded by Burnett as “Farewell Song” printed in a Richard Burnett songbook, c. 1913. An early version was recorded by Emry Arthur in 1928 (Vocalion Vo 5208).

On October 13, 2009 on the Diane Rehm Show, Dr. Ralph Stanley of the Stanley Brothers, born in 1927, discussed the song, its origin, and his effort to revive it: “Man of Constant Sorrow” is probably two or three hundred years old. But the first time I heard it when I was y’know, like a small boy, my daddy — my father — he had some of the words to it, and I heard him sing it, and we — my brother and me — we put a few more words to it, and brought it back in existence. I guess if it hadn’t been for that it’d have been gone forever. I’m proud to be the one that brought that song back, because I think it’s wonderful.”
There is some uncertainty whether Dick Burnett himself wrote the song. One claim is that it was sung by the Mackin clan in 1888 in Ireland and that Cameron O’Mackin emigrated to Tennessee, brought the song with him, and performed it. In an interview he gave toward the end of his life, Burnett himself indicated that he could not remember:

Charles Wolfe: “What about this “Farewell Song” — ‘I am a man of constant sorrow’ — did you write it?”
Richard Burnett: “No, I think I got the ballad from somebody — I dunno. It may be my song…”

If Burnett wrote the song, the date of its composition, or at least of the editing of certain lyrics by Burnett, can be fixed at about 1913. Since it is known that Burnett was born in 1883, married in 1905, and blinded in 1907, the dating of two of these texts can be made on the basis of internal evidence. The second stanza of “Farewell Song” mentions that the singer has been blind six years, which put the date at 1913. According to the Country Music Annual, Burnett “probably tailored a pre-existing song to fit his blindness” and may have adapted a hymn. Charles Wolfe argues that “Burnett probably based his melody on an old Baptist hymn called “Wandering Boy”.

Stanley’s autobiography is titled Man of Constant Sorrow

“I am a man of constant sorrow
I’ve seen trouble all my days
I’ll say goodbye to Colorado
Where I was born and partly raised.

Your mother says I’m a stranger
My face you’ll never see no more
But there’s one promise, darling
I’ll see you on God’s golden shore.

Through this open world I’m about to ramble
Through ice and snow, sleet and rain
I’m about to ride that morning railroad
Perhaps I’ll die on that train.

I’m going back to Colorado
The place that I started from
If I knowed how bad you’d treat me
Honey, I never would have come.”

Bob Dylan stated, “Roscoe Holcomb has a certain untamed sense of control, which makes him one of the best.” Eric Clapton called Holcomb “my favorite [country] musician.” Holcomb’s white-knuckle performances reflect a time before radio told musicians how to play, and these recordings make other music seem watered-down in comparison. His high, tense voice inspired the term “high lonesome sound.” Self-accompanied on banjo, fiddle, guitar, or harmonica, these songs express the hard life he lived and the tradition in which he was raised. Includes his vintage 1961 “Man of Constant Sorrow.”

 

Bob Dylan – Hurricane (original) and yes: LYRICS!


BOB DYLAN LYRICS

“Hurricane”

Pistols shots ring out in the barroom night
Enter Patty Valentine from the upper hall
She sees the bartender in a pool of blood
Cries out “My God they killed them all”
Here comes the story of the Hurricane
The man the authorities came to blame
For something that he never done
Put him in a prison cell but one time he could-a been
The champion of the world.

Three bodies lying there does Patty see
And another man named Bello moving around mysteriously
“I didn’t do it” he says and he throws up his hands
“I was only robbing the register I hope you understand
I saw them leaving” he says and he stops
“One of us had better call up the cops”
And so Patty calls the cops
And they arrive on the scene with their red lights flashing
In the hot New Jersey night.

Meanwhile far away in another part of town
Rubin Carter and a couple of friends are driving around
Number one contender for the middleweight crown
Had no idea what kinda shit was about to go down
When a cop pulled him over to the side of the road
Just like the time before and the time before that
In Patterson that’s just the way things go
If you’re black you might as well not shown up on the street
‘Less you wanna draw the heat.

Alfred Bello had a partner and he had a rap for the corps
Him and Arthur Dexter Bradley were just out prowling around
He said “I saw two men running out they looked like middleweights
They jumped into a white car with out-of-state plates”
And Miss Patty Valentine just nodded her head
Cop said “Wait a minute boys this one’s not dead”
So they took him to the infirmary
And though this man could hardly see
They told him that he could identify the guilty men.

Four in the morning and they haul Rubin in
Take him to the hospital and they bring him upstairs
The wounded man looks up through his one dying eye
Says “Wha’d you bring him in here for ? He ain’t the guy !”
Yes here comes the story of the Hurricane
The man the authorities came to blame
For something that he never done
Put in a prison cell but one time he could-a been
The champion of the world.

Four months later the ghettos are in flame
Rubin’s in South America fighting for his name
While Arthur Dexter Bradley’s still in the robbery game
And the cops are putting the screws to him looking for somebody to blame
“Remember that murder that happened in a bar ?”
“Remember you said you saw the getaway car?”
“You think you’d like to play ball with the law ?”
“Think it might-a been that fighter you saw running that night ?”
“Don’t forget that you are white”.

Arthur Dexter Bradley said “I’m really not sure”
Cops said “A boy like you could use a break
We got you for the motel job and we’re talking to your friend Bello
Now you don’t wanta have to go back to jail be a nice fellow
You’ll be doing society a favor
That sonofabitch is brave and getting braver
We want to put his ass in stir
We want to pin this triple murder on him
He ain’t no Gentleman Jim”.

Rubin could take a man out with just one punch
But he never did like to talk about it all that much
It’s my work he’d say and I do it for pay
And when it’s over I’d just as soon go on my way
Up to some paradise
Where the trout streams flow and the air is nice
And ride a horse along a trail
But then they took him to the jailhouse
Where they try to turn a man into a mouse.

All of Rubin’s cards were marked in advance
The trial was a pig-circus he never had a chance
The judge made Rubin’s witnesses drunkards from the slums
To the white folks who watched he was a revolutionary bum
And to the black folks he was just a crazy nigger
No one doubted that he pulled the trigger
And though they could not produce the gun
The DA said he was the one who did the deed
And the all-white jury agreed.

Rubin Carter was falsely tried
The crime was murder ‘one’ guess who testified
Bello and Bradley and they both baldly lied
And the newspapers they all went along for the ride
How can the life of such a man
Be in the palm of some fool’s hand ? 
To see him obviously framed
Couldn’t help but make me feel ashamed to live in a land 
Where justice is a game.

Now all the criminals in their coats and their ties
Are free to drink martinis and watch the sun rise
While Rubin sits like Buddha in a ten-foot cell
An innocent man in a living hell
That’s the story of the Hurricane
But it won’t be over till they clear his name
And give him back the time he’s done
Put him in a prison cell but one time he could-a been
The champion of the world.

 

 

Bob Dylan- With God On Our Side (Lyrics In Description) Listen and learn! don’t listen and err!



Oh my name it is nothin’
My age it means less
The country I come from
Is called the Midwest
I’s taught and brought up there
The laws to abide
And the land that I live in
Has God on its side.

Oh the history books tell it
They tell it so well
The cavalries charged
The Indians fell
The cavalries charged
The Indians died
Oh the country was young
With God on its side.

The Spanish-American
War had its day
And the Civil War too
Was soon laid away
And the names of the heroes
I’s made to memorize
With guns on their hands
And God on their side.

The First World War, boys
It came and it went
The reason for fighting
I never did get
But I learned to accept it
Accept it with pride
For you don’t count the dead
When God’s on your side.

When the Second World War
Came to an end
We forgave the Germans
And then we were friends
Though they murdered six million
In the ovens they fried
The Germans now too
Have God on their side.

I’ve learned to hate Russians
All through my whole life
If another war comes
It’s them we must fight
To hate them and fear them
To run and to hide
And accept it all bravely
With God on my side.

But now we got weapons
Of the chemical dust
If fire them we’re forced to
Then fire them we must
One push of the button
And a shot the world wide
And you never ask questions
When God’s on your side.

In a many dark hour
I’ve been thinkin’ about this
That Jesus Christ
Was betrayed by a kiss
But I can’t think for you
You’ll have to decide
Whether Judas Iscariot
Had God on his side.

So now as I’m leavin’
I’m weary as Hell
The confusion I’m feelin’
Ain’t no tongue can tell
The words fill my head
And fall to the floor
If God’s on our side
He’ll stop the next war.

 

Bob Dylan – Shelter From the Storm (Original studio version, from Blood on the Tracks) WOW!



BOB DYLAN LYRICS

“Shelter From The Storm”

I was in another lifetime one of toil and blood
When blackness was a virtue and the road was full of mud
I came in from the wilderness a creature void of form
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

And if I pass this way again you can rest assured
I’ll always do my best for her on that I give my word
In a world of steel-eyed death and men who are fighting to be warm
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

Not a word was spoke between us there was little risk involved
Everything up to that point had been left unresolved
Try imagining a place where it’s always safe and warm
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

I was burned out from exhaustion buried in the hail
Poisoned in the bushes and blown out on the trail
Hunted like a crocodile ravaged in the corn
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

Suddenly I turned around and she was standing there
With silver bracelets on her wrists and flowers in her hair
She walked up to me so gracefully and took my crown of thorns
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

Now there’s a wall between us something there’s been lost
I took too much for granted got my signals crossed
Just to think that it all began on a long-forgotten morn
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

Well the deputy walks on hard nails and the preacher rides a mount
But nothing really matters much it’s doom alone that counts
And the one-eyed undertaker he blows a futile horn
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.
I’ve heard newborn babies wailing like a mourning dove
And old men with broken teeth stranded without love
Do I understand your question man is it hopeless and forlorn
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

In a little hilltop village they gambled for my clothes
I bargained for salvation and they gave me a lethal dose
I offered up my innocence and got repaid with scorn
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

Well I’m living in a foreign country but I’m bound to cross the line
Beauty walks a razor’s edge someday I’ll make it mine
If I could only turn back the clock to when God and her were born
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

 

Bob Dylan – A Hard Rain’s Gonna Fall


BOB DYLAN LYRICS

“A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall”

Oh, where have you been, my blue-eyed son?
And where have you been my darling young one?
I’ve stumbled on the side of twelve misty mountains
I’ve walked and I’ve crawled on six crooked highways
I’ve stepped in the middle of seven sad forests
I’ve been out in front of a dozen dead oceans
I’ve been ten thousand miles in the mouth of a graveyard
And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, and it’s a hard
It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

Oh, what did you see, my blue eyed son?
And what did you see, my darling young one?
I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it
I saw a highway of diamonds with nobody on it
I saw a black branch with blood that kept drippin’
I saw a room full of men with their hammers a-bleedin’
I saw a white ladder all covered with water
I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken
I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children
And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, and it’s a hard
It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

And what did you hear, my blue-eyed son?
And what did you hear, my darling young one?
I heard the sound of a thunder that roared out a warnin’
I heard the roar of a wave that could drown the whole world
I heard one hundred drummers whose hands were a-blazin’
I heard ten thousand whisperin’ and nobody listenin’
I heard one person starve, I heard many people laughin’
Heard the song of a poet who died in the gutter
Heard the sound of a clown who cried in the alley
And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard
And it’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

Oh, what did you meet my blue-eyed son ?
Who did you meet, my darling young one?
I met a young child beside a dead pony
I met a white man who walked a black dog
I met a young woman whose body was burning
I met a young girl, she gave me a rainbow
I met one man who was wounded in love
I met another man who was wounded in hatred
And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard
And it’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

And what’ll you do now, my blue-eyed son?
And what’ll you do now my darling young one?
I’m a-goin’ back out ‘fore the rain starts a-fallin’
I’ll walk to the depths of the deepest black forest
Where the people are a many and their hands are all empty
Where the pellets of poison are flooding their waters
Where the home in the valley meets the damp dirty prison
And the executioner’s face is always well hidden
Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten
Where black is the color, where none is the number
And I’ll tell and speak it and think it and breathe it
And reflect from the mountain so all souls can see it
And I’ll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin’
But I’ll know my song well before I start singing
And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, and it’s a hard
It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

 

 

Bob Dylan-Knockin’ on Heaven’s door-1973 Cover version


Bob Dylan’s I Shall Be Released (to all those who carry around a conscience, like a ball and chain, building the pass to TRUTH)


They say evrything can be replaced,
Yet evry distance is not near.
So I remember evry face
Of evry man who put me here.
I see my light come shining
From the west unto the east.
Any day now, any day now,
I shall be released.

They say evry man needs protection,
They say evry man must fall.
Yet I swear I see my reflection
Some place so high above this wall.
I see my light come shining
From the west unto the east.
Any day now, any day now,
I shall be released.

Standing next to me in this lonely crowd,
Is a man who swears he’s not to blame.
All day long I hear him shout so loud,
Crying out that he was framed.
I see my light come shining
From the west unto the east.
Any day now, any day now,
I shall be released.

The Band and Friends performing an incredible tune, “I Shall Be Released”, during their last concert with the original lineup.

Bob Dylan sings ‘I Dreamed I Saw Saint Augustine’s’


[youtube.com/watch?v=ql24ZyLHu24]

I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine” is a song by Bob Dylan that was originally released on his 1967 album John Wesley Harding. It was recorded at the first John Wesley Harding session on October 17, 1967.[1] It has been covered by many artists, including Joan Baez, Vic Chesnutt, John Doe, Thea Gilmore, Adam Selzer and Dirty Projectors.[2] In addition, Jimi Hendrix at one point intended to cover this song, but felt it was too personal to Dylan and instead covered a different song from the album, “All Along the Watchtower“.[3]

“I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine” is a pensive ballad.[4] Like the rest of the John Wesley Harding album, the music of “I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine” uses spare, unobtrusive musical accompaniment.[4] The primary instruments are an acoustic guitar and drums.[4] The lyrics describe a dream that is enigmatic and subject to interpretation.[4] However, the lyrics do convey a deeply felt sense of guilt, as well as a vision of faith, righteousness, fear and betrayal.[4][5] The sense of guilt is particularly prevalent in the final verse:[4]

“I dreamed I saw St. Augustine
Alive, with fiery breath
And I dreamed I was amongst the ones that put him out to death
Oh, I awoke in anger, so alone and terrified
I put my fingers against the glass
And bowed my head and cried.”

(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Dreamed_I_Saw_St._Augustine)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JOAN BAEZ ~ I Dreamed I Saw Saint Augustine ~


[youtube.com/watch?v=dKlmc8HpkI4]
I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine (lyrics and  music  by Bob Dylan)

I dreamed I saw St. Augustine
Alive as you or me
Tearing through these quarters
In the utmost misery
With a blanket underneath his arm
And a coat of solid gold
Searching for the very souls
Whom already have been sold.

“Arise, arise”, he cried so loud
With a voice without restraint
“Come out ye gifted kings and queens
And hear my sad complaint

No martyr is among ye now
Whom you can call your own
So go on your way accordingly
But know you’re not alone”.

I dreamed I saw St. Augustine
Alive with fiery breath
And I dreamed I was amongst the ones
That put him out to death
Oh, I awoke in anger
So alone and terrified
I put my fingers against the glass
And bowed my head and cried.

Bob Dylan – Maggie’s Farm (Newport, 1965): Happy October 15, 2011!


I ain’t gonna work on Maggie’s farm no more
No, I aint gonna work on Maggie’s farm no more
Well, I wake up in the morning
Fold my hands and pray for rain
I got a head full of ideas
That are drivin’ me insane
It’s a shame the way she makes me scrub the floor
I ain’t gonna work on Maggie’s farm no more.

I ain’t gonna work for Maggie’s brother no more
No, I aint gonna work for Maggie’s brother no more
Well, he hands you a nickel
He hands you a dime
He asks you with a grin
If you’re havin’ a good time
Then he fines you every time you slam the door
I ain’t gonna work for Maggie’s brother more.

I ain’t gonna work for Maggie’s pa no more
No, I aint gonna work for Maggie’s pa no more
Well, he puts his cigar
Out in your face just for kicks
His bedroom window
It is made out of bricks
The National Guard stands around his door
Ah, I ain’t gonna work for Maggie’s pa no more.

I ain’t gonna work for Maggie’s ma no more
No, I ain’t gonna work for Maggie’s ma no more
Well, when she talks to all the servants
About man and God and law
Everybody says
She’s the brains behind pa
She’s sixty-eight, but she says she’s twenty-four
I ain’t gonna work for Maggie’s ma no more.

I ain’t gonna work on Maggie’s farm no more
I aint gonna work on Maggie’s farm no more
Well, I try my best
To be just like I am
But everybody wants you
To be just like them
They say sing while you slave and I just get bored
I ain’t gonna work on Maggie’s farm no more.
[ Lyrics from: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/b/bob_dylan/maggies_farm.htm

More lyrics: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/b/bob_dylan/#share

The lyrics of the song follow a straightforward blues structure, with the opening line of each verse (“I ain’t gonna work…”) sung twice, then reiterated at the end of the verse. The third to fifth lines of each verse elaborate on and explain the sentiment expressed in the verse’s opening/closing lines.

“Maggie’s Farm” is frequently interpreted as Dylan‘s declaration of independence from the protest folk movement.[1] Punning on Silas McGee’s Farm, where he had performed “Only a Pawn in Their Game” at a civil rights protest in 1963 (featured in the film Dont Look Back), Maggie’s Farm recasts Dylan as the pawn and the folk music scene as the oppressor. The middle stanzas ridicule various types in the folk scene, the promoter who tries to control your art (fining you when you slam the door), the paranoid militant (whose window is bricked over), and the condescending activist who is more uptight than she claims (“She’s 68 but she says she’s 54”). The first and last stanzas detail how Dylan feels strait-jacketed by the expectations of the folk scene (“It’s a shame the way she makes me scrub the floor” and “they say sing while you slave”), needing room to express his “head full of ideas,” and complains that, even though he tries his best to be just like he is, “everybody wants you to be just like them”.

The song, essentially a protest song against protest folk, represents Dylan’s transition from a folk singer who sought authenticity in traditional song-forms and activist politics to an innovative stylist whose self-exploration made him a cultural muse for a generation. (See “Like a Rolling Stone” and influence on The Beatles, etc.)

On the other hand, this biographical context provides only one of many lenses through which to interpret the text. While some may see “Maggie’s Farm” as a repudiation of the protest-song tradition associated with folk music, it can also (ironically) be seen as itself a deeply political protest song. We are told, for example, that the “National Guard” stands around the farm door, and that Maggie’s mother talks of “Man and God and Law.” The “farm” that Dylan sings of can in this case easily represent racism, state oppression and capitalist exploitation.

In fact this theme of capitalist exploitation came to be seen by some as the major theme of the song. In this interpretation, Maggie’s Farm is the military industrial complex, and Dylan is singing for the youth of his time, urging them to reject society.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maggie%27s_Farm)

Johnny Cash: When Papa Played The Dobro (Flatt / Scruggs)


Artist/Band: 

Johnny Cash

 

 

My papa was a hobo when they delivered me

We didn’t have a doctor cause he couldn’t pay the fee

But when the goin’ got too bad to ease his misery
Papa played the dobro this a way and he’d go

[ dobro ]

When company would come around he kept the dobro hid

He knew he couldn’t play the way the other players did

Why the guitar’s resonator was a gallon bucket lid

But papa played the dobro this a way and he’d go

[ dobro ]

Well now that papa’s gone away it’s hanging by the flue

The top of it’s rusted and the strings’re rusty too

It won’t ever sound the way that it did when it was new

When papa played the dobro this a way and he’d go

[ dobro ]

 

Bob Dylan At 70, via ABC


Check out the photos and comments via KTLA

Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman; May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, poet, and painter. He has been a major figure in music for five decades.[1] Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s when he was an informal chronicler, and an apparently reluctant figurehead, of social unrest. Though he is well-known for revolutionizing perceptions of the limits of popular music in 1965 with the six-minute single “Like a Rolling Stone,”[2] a number of his earlier songs such as “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are a-Changin’” became anthems for the US civil rights[3] and anti-war[4] movements.

Read more about Bob Dylan at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Dylan

Jimmy Hendrix: All Along The Watchtower



All Along The Watch Tower, by Bob Dylan
There must be some kind of way out of here

Said the joker to the thief
Theres too much confusion
I cant get no relief
Businessman they drink my wine
Plow men dig my earth
None will level on the line
Nobody of it is worth
Hey hey

No reason to get excited
The thief he kindly spoke
There are many here among us
Who feel that life is but a joke but uh
But you and I weve been through that
And this is not our fate
So let us not talk falsely now
The hours getting late
Hey Hey

All along the watchtower
Princes kept the view
While all the women came and went
Bare-foot servants to, but huh
Outside in the cold distance
A wild cat did growl
Two riders were approachin
And the wind began to howl
Hey Oh
All along the watchtower
Hear you sing around the watch
Gotta beware gotta beware I will
Yeah Ooh baby
All along the watchtower
“All Along the Watchtower” is a song written and recorded by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. The song, which has been included on most of Dylan’s greatest hits compilations, initially appeared on his 1967 album John Wesley Harding. Over the past 35 years, he has performed it in concert more than any of his other songs.
Sourse: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Along_the_Watchtower

Bob Dylan: Blood in my eyes for you


Woke up this morning, feeling blue
Seen a good looking girl, can I make love with you
Hey, hey, babe, I got blood in my eyes for you
Hey, hey, babe, I got blood in my eyes for you
I got blood in my eyes for you, baby
I don’t care what in the world you do.

I went back home, put on my tie
Gonna get that girl that money will buy
Hey, hey, babe, I got blood in my eyes for you
Hey, hey, babe, I got blood in my eyes for you
I got blood in my eyes for you, baby
I don’t care what in the world you do.

She looked at me, begin to smile
Said, “Hey, hey, man, can’t you wait a little while ?”
No, no babe, I got blood in my eyes for you
No, no babe, I got blood in my eyes for you
Got blood in my eyes for you, baby
I don’t care what in the world you do.

No, no, ma’am, I can’t wait
You got my money, now you’re trying to break this date
Hey, hey, babe, I got blood in my eyes for you
Hey, hey, babe, I got blood in my eyes for you
Got blood in my eyes for you, baby
I don’t care what in the world you do.

I’ll tell you something, tell you the facts
You don’t want to give my money back
Hey, hey, babe, I got blood in my eyes for you
Hey, hey, babe, I got blood in my eyes for you
I got blood in my eyes for you, baby
I don’t care what in the world you do.

Bob Dylan:The Band – Forever Young




Forever Young Bob Dylan

May God bless and keep you always,
May your wishes all come true,
May you always do for others
And let others do for you.
May you build a ladder to the stars
And climb on every rung,
May you stay forever young,
Forever young, forever young,
May you stay forever young.

May you grow up to be righteous,
May you grow up to be true,
May you always know the truth
And see the lights surrounding you.
May you always be courageous,
Stand upright and be strong,
May you stay forever young,
Forever young, forever young,
May you stay forever young.

May your hands always be busy,
May your feet always be swift,
May you have a strong foundation
When the winds of changes shift.
May your heart always be joyful,
May your song always be sung,
May you stay forever young,
Forever young, forever young,
May you stay forever young.

Bob Dylan: Just Like A Woman


Just Like A Woman

Just Like A Woman, Bob Dylan

Nobody feels any pain
Tonight as I stand inside the rain
Ev’rybody knows
That Baby’s got new clothes
But lately I see her ribbons and her bows
Have fallen from her curls
She takes just like a woman, yes she does
She makes love just like a woman, yes she does
And she aches just like a woman
But she breaks just like a little girl.

Queen Mary, she’s my friend
Yes, I believe I’ll go see her again
Nobody has to guess
That Baby can’t be blessed
Till she finally sees that she’s like all the rest
With her fog, her amphetamine and her pearls
She takes just like a woman, yes she does
She makes love just like a woman, yes she does
And she aches just like a woman
But she breaks just like a little girl.

It’s was raining from the first
And I was dying there of thirst
So I came in here
And your long-time curse hurts
But what’s worse
Is this pain in here
I can’t stay in here
Ain’t it clear that.

I just can’t fit
Yes, I believe it’s time for us to quit
When we meet again
Introduced as friends
Please don’t let on that you knew me when
I was hungry and it was your world
Ah, you fake just like a woman, yes you do
You make love just like a woman, yes you do
Then you ache just like a woman
But you break just like a little girl.

Bob Dylan: Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right


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And here it’s Joan Baez’s interpretation:

Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right

It ain’t no use to sit and wonder why, babe
It don’t matter, anyhow
An’ it ain’t no use to sit and wonder why, babe
If you don’t know by now
When your rooster crows at the break of dawn
Look out your window and I’ll be gone
You’re the reason I’m trav’lin’ on
Don’t think twice, it’s all right

It ain’t no use in turnin’ on your light, babe
That light I never knowed
An’ it ain’t no use in turnin’ on your light, babe
I’m on the dark side of the road
Still I wish there was somethin’ you would do or say
To try and make me change my mind and stay
We never did too much talkin’ anyway
So don’t think twice, it’s all right

It ain’t no use in callin’ out my name, gal
Like you never did before
It ain’t no use in callin’ out my name, gal
I can’t hear you anymore
I’m a-thinkin’ and a-wond’rin’ all the way down the road
I once loved a woman, a child I’m told
I give her my heart but she wanted my soul
But don’t think twice, it’s all right

I’m walkin’ down that long, lonesome road, babe
Where I’m bound, I can’t tell
But goodbye’s too good a word, gal
So I’ll just say fare thee well
I ain’t sayin’ you treated me unkind
You could have done better but I don’t mind
You just kinda wasted my precious time
But don’t think twice, it’s all right

The greatest call of artistic creation is to build an environment for analysis, to bring one to think about the work of art. That in itself is a journey. It may take years, and many changes in ones opinion about deeper meaning and message. Take the case of Mona Lisa Portrait: People have contemplated for centuries the meaning of  her smile. Among many other quests for truth I have been fascinated by the depth of the poem ” Don’t think twice” composed by Bob Dylan and interpreted by Bob Dylan, song that was meaningful to other well known singers, such as Johnny Cash.
 If one so chooses one may not give  to much significance, enjoy the song, the challenge of the one man band, playing the guitar, voice, and the harmonica, (for which Bob created the hand free neck wire rack to hold his harmonica. But is the song just about a break-up of an half- lived, ever more demanding relationship between a man and a woman, or is there a much more fundamental circumstance of moving on and away from an unwinning position in life, singing, playing the harmonica, free to choose the direction and the place  of your next breath, in confidence that you have what it takes to undertake such enterprise, to find a more suitable ground on which to build your life.  One thing is sure: I find value in this composition, beyond eyes and ears meet and a good place to start in life when determined to succeed where others just survive.   It is about the optimistic attitude one needs in life in order to be able to jump over the self-pity place where loss hold you and into to a spot suitable for a fresh start, ready to meet the consequences.

Therefore when I wake up early morning I tell myself that I will search for excellence, for truth, for meaning with every breath I take: Sometimes it helps to tell myself: “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right…Everything will Turn Out fine”. So far it did work:

 Thanks Bob, 

George. 🙂