Tag Archives: booker t washington

picture of the day: W.E.B. Du Bois



W.E.B. Du Bois

William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was born on February 23, 1868, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. W.E.B. Du Bois was the first African American to earn a doctorate from Harvard University. As a sociologist, he focused on the problem of race for blacks in the United States. He became an influential leader of black Americans, presenting an alternative to Booker T. Washington, whose policies Du Bois considered too conservative and too accommodating to whites. Du Bois, believing that blacks could achieve progress only through protest, encouraged black nationalism and supported Pan-Africanism. Du Bois also founded the Niagara Movement, served as the NAACP’s director of research and editor of its magazine Crisis, and taught and published his philosophy at Atlanta University. W.E.B. Du Bois died at the age of 95 in 1963.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.RFxc4pyE.dpuf

Advertisements

today’s Image: George Washington Carver (Library of Congress)



George Washington Carver
After devoting his life to helping fellow African Americans through education, George Washington Carver died on January 5, 1943, at Tuskegee, Alabama. Carver was born the son of a slave woman in the early 1860s, went to college in Iowa and then headed to Alabama in 1896. There, at the Tuskegee Institute, Carver served as an agricultural chemist, experimenter, teacher and administrator, working to improve life for African Americans in the rural South by teaching them better agricultural skills. One of the farming methods Carver devised, using peanut and soybean crops to enrich soil depleted by cotton crops, revolutionized Southern farming. Carver became somewhat of a benevolent example of the potential of black intellectuals. He was well-respected by people such as President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mahatma Gandhi, Josef Stalin and Thomas Edison, whose offer of a job for more than $100 a year Carver refused. Carver worked at Tuskegee until his death.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.kQvgtdYP.dpuf

“Dignify and glorify common labor. … It is at the bottom of life that we must begin, not at the top.” Booker T. Washington


Dignify and glorify common labor. … It is at the bottom of life that we must begin, not at the top.Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

quotation: No man, who continues to add something to the material, intellectual and moral well-being of the place in which he lives, is left long without proper reward. Booker T. Washington


No man, who continues to add something to the material, intellectual and moral well-being of the place in which he lives, is left long without proper reward.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

QUOTATION: Booker T. Washington


One man cannot hold another man down in the ditch without remaining down in the ditch with him.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Booker T. Washington ABOUT WORK


Nothing ever comes to me, that is worth having, except as the result of hard work.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Quotation: Booker T. Washington – about nations and slavery


I pity from the bottom of my heart any nation or body of people that is so unfortunate as to get entangled in the net of slavery.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

 

Quotation: Booker T. Washington about oppression


Oppression of the unfortunate makes one weak.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

 

Quotation: Booker T. Washington on assistance to the weak


Assistance given to the weak makes the one who gives it strong.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss