Tag Archives: Britain

this day in the yesteryear: Suez Canal Crisis Begins (1956)


Suez Canal Crisis Begins (1956)

After Britain and the US withdrew their financial pledges to help Egypt build the Aswan High Dam, Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser nationalized the Suez Canal, angering Britain and France, which had direct financial stakes in the canal. A joint invasion of Egypt ensued, but UN intervention led to an armistice in November. The canal, blocked for months due to damage, reopened in 1957. What politician involved in the aftermath is considered the father of the modern concept of “peacekeeping”? More… Discuss

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Farage: The Last European Commission that Governs Britain |europarl


Farage: The Last European Commission that Governs Britain

today’s birthday: Margaret Thatcher (1925)


Margaret Thatcher (1925)

The first female prime minister of Great Britain, Thatcher served longer than any other British prime minister in the 20th century. She is noted for policies that dismantled many aspects of Britain’s postwar welfare state and privatized many state-run industries. Her introduction of a controversial “poll tax” met with widespread public disapproval and contributed, along with internal party disputes over European integration, to her 1990 resignation. Why was she called the “Iron Lady“? More… Discuss

news: Tens of Thousands Protest in Hong Kong


Tens of Thousands Protest in Hong Kong

Tens of thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators have taken to the streets in Hong Kong to protest Beijing‘s plan to vet candidates for the post of chief executive of Hong Kong in the 2017 elections. Since 1997, when Britain handed Hong Kong back to China, the chief executive has been selected by a 1,200-member election committee with pro-Beijing leanings. Last month, China agreed to allow direct elections in 2017, with the proviso that voters will only be able to choose from a list of pre-approved, almost undoubtedly pro-Beijing candidates. The protesters are demanding the freedom to choose their candidates. More… Discuss

article: The Holy Grail


The Holy Grail

In Christian mythology, the Holy Grail is the dish, cup, bowl, or chalice used by Jesus at the Last Supper, said to possess miraculous powers. According to many versions of the story, Joseph of Arimathea used the Grail to catch drops of Jesus’ blood at the Crucifixion and then took the object to Britain, where he founded a line of guardians to protect it. The quest for the Holy Grail also makes up an important part of the Arthurian cycle. Which knight is most closely associated with the Grail? More… Discuss

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news: Cell Phones’ Effects on Adolescent Brains


Cell Phones’ Effects on Adolescent Brains

Although today’s youth cannot conceive of a world without cell phones, the devices have only been around for a few decades, and little is definitively known about their health effects. Researchers in Britain are therefore launching a study to investigate the effects of cell phones and similar devices on children’s brain development. It will track some 2,500 preteens into early adolescence and evaluate cognitive functions like memory and attention in an effort to discern whether their use of mobile phones, smartphones, or other wireless devices plays a role either in improving or impairing these functions. More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: MARGARET THATCHER BECOMES PRIME MINISTER OF THE UK (1979)


Margaret Thatcher Becomes Prime Minister of the UK (1979)

Thatcher was Great Britain’s first female prime minister and served longer than any other British prime minister in the 20th century. While in office, she initiated what became known as the “Thatcher Revolution,” a series of social and economic changes that dismantled many aspects of Britain’s postwar welfare state, establishing free-market economic policies and deregulating industries. Before embarking on her political career, she was a research chemist working with what popular dessert food? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: GAMBIA INDEPENDENCE DAY


Gambia Independence Day

Gambia gained independence from Britain on February 18, 1965, and became a constitutional monarchy. On that day, people gathered in Bathurst for music, dancing, and the replacement of the Union Jack with the Gambian flag. A public vote in 1970 made the Republic of the Gambia a British Commonwealth. Independence Day is a national holiday in Gambia. More…Discuss

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: GRENADA INDEPENDENCE DAY


Grenada Independence Day

This is a national holiday commemorating Grenada‘s independence from Britain on this day in 1974. Britain had held the island since the 18th century, when France ceded it under the Treaty of ParisMore… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: SIR EDWARD COKE (1552)


Sir Edward Coke (1552)

One of the most eminent jurists in the history of English law, Coke held some of the highest legal offices in Britain during his career. However, his enduring fame and importance rests principally on his legal writings, which for centuries served as invaluable guides to jurists both at home and abroad, and on his staunch defense of common law in the face of royal absolutism, a position which earned him the ire of many powerful figures, like kings and church leaders. Who was Coke’s chief rival? More… Discuss

 

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This Day in the Yesteryear: VOTERS REJECT PROPOSAL TO ESTABLISH AUSTRALIA AS A REPUBLIC (1999)


Voters Reject Proposal to Establish Australia as a Republic (1999)

The British began settling Australia in 1788, and before long, the entire continent was a British dependency. Over the years, Britain’s role in Australian government has been progressively restricted, yet Australians remain reluctant to entirely cut ties, as evidenced by the 1999 referendum in which voters rejected a plan to establish Australia as a republic and replace the British monarch as head of state with a president elected by parliament. What other measure did they strike down? More… Discuss

 

Forbidden Knowledge: Castles & Fortresses (Documentary)



Forbidden Knowledge We investigate the castle that helped create Great Britain and learn why it was such an impregnable fortress. Then it’s off to discover the invisible underground defensive systems of Cappadocia and how they proved so successful they are they longest continually inhabited fortress in history. We test the ancient Mayan killer bee castle defences, and release bees in an attack. We build a replica section of the ancient Roman fort of Alesia and discover whether the great general Julius Caesar could really have built 24 miles of defences in just 6 weeks. We investigate the most impregnable walls in history – the multi-layered defences of Constantinople – and discover the type of cannon that the sultan Mehmet used to finally destroy them in the great siege of 1453. Finally, we fire one of these cannons for the first time in hundreds of years and collect invaluable ballistic data.

 

THE BRITISH OVERSEAS TERRITORIES


The British Overseas Territories

At the height of its power in the late 19th century, the British Empire had acquired about one quarter of the world’s land area, including territories with large indigenous populations in Asia and Africa. Some colonies have since gained independence, but Britain continues to control the administration and legislature of 14 colonies known as the British Overseas Territories. As they are found on or near every continent, the sun still never sets on the British Empire. What are the 14 colonies? More…Discuss

 

This Day in the yesteryear: BRITISH AIRSHIP CRASHES NEAR BEAUVAIS (1930)


British Airship Crashes near Beauvais (1930)

In 1920s Britain, airships were envisioned as a way to make the most remote parts of the British Empire accessible. Two starkly different teams of engineers were employed to create two crafts for passenger travel, one conservative and one more experimental. However, British use of airships effectively ended when the ambitious R101 crashed in France during its maiden overseas voyage, killing 48 people—12 more than the infamous Hindenburg disaster. What was R101’s destination?More… Discuss

 

ST. PIERRE AND MIQUELON


St. Pierre and Miquelon

The sole remnant of France’s once vast territory in North America, St. Pierre and Miquelon is an archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean south of the Canadian island of Newfoundland. France and Britain fought over control of the islands for centuries, until France finally retook them for good in 1814. The area was a hotbed of alcohol smuggling during the US prohibition era and has the odd distinction being the only place in North America where a guillotine was ever used. What is the “Mouth of Hell“? More… Discuss

 

Hadrian’s Wall: What did Rome think when they built it? Thah it will keep Roman’s Empire ememies Outsite!


Hadrian’s Wall

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Stretching 73.5 mi (118.3 km), Hadrian’s Wall was an ancient Roman wall built in Britain. Constructed mainly in the 2nd century CE under Emperor Hadrian, it guarded the northwestern frontier of the province from Celtic and other invaders. Fragments of the wall, 6 ft (1.8 m) high and 8 ft (2.4 m) thick, and many of its mile stations are still extant and are some of the largest and most significant remains of the Roman occupation. What other wall was built by the Romans in Britain? More… Discuss

“Quis  who magnum   murum  wall inter  Britanniam et  Caledoniam aedificavit”

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‘US of Europe total disgrace, collapsing as we speak’: This Was Yesterday



The British Parliament has voted overwhelmingly against holding a referendum on leaving the European Union. A petition of over 100 thousand signatures from the public had called for the debate. The government earlier ordered its MPs to vote against the motion – or face penalties. Despite this, dozens of David Cameron’s party members defied the order, in what’s been the biggest internal challenge he’s faced as Prime Minister. But Jon Gaunt, from the ‘Vote UK out of the EU’ campaign, says Britain never signed up for what the EU turned out to be.
(Source of Commentary:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22zgJ0Iqunk&feature=related)