Tag Archives: british army

today’s birthday: Francis Younghusband (1863)


Francis Younghusband (1863)

Younghusband was a British Army officer and explorer remembered for his travels in the Far East and Central Asia. In 1887, he journeyed from China to India, crossing the Gobi desert and the Mustagh Pass of the Karakorum range. In 1904, he led a military expedition that participated in the massacring of Tibetan troops and forced a treaty upon Tibet that opened it to Western trade. Apparently, he later regretted his role in these events. What changed his mind? More… Discuss

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today’s birthday: Frederick Russell Burnham (1861)


Frederick Russell Burnham (1861)

Burnham was an American adventurer whose outdoorsmanship helped inspire the founding of the international scout movement. He was born on an Indian reservation to a missionary family and became a horseback messenger for Western Union Telegraph Company at age 13 and soon after a scout and tracker. After two decades of ranging in the Southwest and Mexico, he moved to Africa to become the British army’s chief of scouts during the Boer War. His tracking skills earned him what nickname in Africa? More… Discuss

picture of the day



On August 2, 1944, a French ArmySherman‘ tank lands on a Normandy beach from USS LST-517 during the European Campaign during World War II.

Photo: U.S. Army Signal Corps

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.37P42IyP.dpuf

this day in the yesteryear: Singapore Established as a Trading Post (1819)


Singapore Established as a Trading Post (1819)

A trading center as early as the 14th century, Singapore was later part of Johor, a region of the southern Malay Peninsula. In 1819, the island of Singapore was ceded to the British East India Company, and the city was founded the same year by Sir Thomas Raffles. Under Raffles’ direction, Singapore developed a vital role in the lucrative China trade. Today, the city is one of the world’s biggest ports. The earliest known settlement on the island of Singapore was referred to by what name? More… Discuss

picture of the day: Adolf Hitler Becomes Chancellor



Adolf Hitler Becomes Chancellor

German President Paul von Hindenburg (right) made Adolf Hitler chancellor on January 30, 1933. After World War I, Germany fell into disarray and looked for a leader to strengthen it again. Hitler had emerged after joining the Nazi Party in 1919 and taking it over in 1921. In 1932 Hitler ran against von Hindenburg and lost–but not by a wide margin. The Nazis won 230 seats in the German parliament and continued to gain influence, stifling democracy and communism by force and by making laws against them. After Hindenburg’s death in 1934, Hitler proclaimed himself Der Führer of the Third Reich and continued as Germany’s leader through World War II.

Image: Collier’s Magazine

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.UOuYX7Ws.dpuf

5 variations on “Rule Britannia” for piano in D flat, major, WoO 79, piano – Yoshio Watanabe Great compositons/performances


5 variationen über “Rule Britannia” (für klavier d-dur, 1803), WoO 79

The “Christmas Truce” of World War I (1914): people who sings same carols in different languages, on Christmas, at least, cannot by enemies, even in the most helish circumstances (not of their own making)


The “Christmas Truce” of World War I (1914)

As Christmas approached in the early months of World War I, British and German troops stationed on the Western Front took it upon themselves to stage an unofficial cease-fire. Roughly 100,000 troops participated in this inspiring display of humanity. Over the course of the brief cessation of hostilities, enemy soldiers caroled together, exchanged gifts, played football, and even attended funerals together. What steps did officials later take to prevent such a cease-fire from happening again? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Treaty of Ghent Signed (1814)


Treaty of Ghent Signed (1814)

The Treaty of Ghent ended the War of 1812 between the US and the UK. Although the treaty was signed in December, fighting continued for several weeks because it took time for news of the agreement to reach North America. The treaty essentially restored prewar borders and failed to deal with the matters of neutral rights and impressment that were the ostensible causes of the conflict. It did, however, included certain progressive terms that called for the signatories to put a stop to what? More… Discuss

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdi – Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 1/Nathalie Stutzmann,: Great compositions/performances


this day in the yesteryear: Scuttling of the French fleet in Toulon (1942)


Scuttling of the French fleet in Toulon (1942)

When Nazi Germany occupied northern and western France in 1940, the coastal city of Toulon fell under Vichy jurisdiction in the so-called unoccupied zone in the south. The center of French naval power since the 19th century, Toulon housed much of the French fleet. When, in 1942, Germany finally occupied all of France and Toulon’s capture appeared imminent, the French scuttled much of the fleet rather than allow the vessels to fall into German hands. What was the German mission in Toulon called? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Bunker Hill Day


Bunker Hill Day

Observed primarily in Boston, Massachusetts, Bunker Hill Day commemorates the Revolutionary War battle of June 1775 between 2,200 British troops and half that number of Americans. It was, in fact, Breed’s Hill that was fortified, not nearby Bunker Hill, and that is where the British attacked the rebels three times. Although the Americans were driven from their fortification and lost some 450 men, it has always been looked upon as one of the great heroic battles of the Revolution. A 221-foot granite obelisk in Charlestown, north of Boston, marks the site of battle. More… Discuss

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE ALDERSHOT BOMBING (1972)


The Aldershot Bombing (1972)

In revenge for the Bloody Sunday incident of a month earlier in which 13 civil-rights protesters in Northern Ireland were shot dead by British paratroopers, the Official IRA detonated a car bomb at the Hampshire, England, headquarters of the British Army’s 16th Parachute Brigade. The intended targets—soldiers and officers—largely escaped harm, but the bomb did claim the lives of seven civilian staff—a priest, a gardener, and five kitchen workers. How did this influence Official IRA tactics? More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: BLOODY SUNDAY: THE BOGSIDE MASSACRE (1972)


Bloody Sunday: The Bogside Massacre (1972)

 

 

 

Mural of victim of Bloody Sunday

Mural of victim of Bloody Sunday (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

In 1968, civil rights protests by Roman Catholics in Northern Ireland sparked violent conflicts with Protestants, resulting in the occupation of the province by British troops. The Bogside Massacre greatly worsened the situation. On “Bloody Sunday”—January 30, 1972—British troops shot 26 unarmed civil rights protesters. Thirteen victims—seven of whom were teenagers—died almost immediately, and a fourteenth later succumbed to his injuries. What did the first inquiry into the massacre find? More… Discuss

 

 

 

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RGiVwM2m18



British Army musicians entertained unsuspecting passersby with a flashmob performance in Birmingham‘s Chamberlain Square. The 60 professionals, from both Regular and Reserve bands, performed the big band classic “Sing, Sing, Sing“, by Louis Prima.

The Corps of Army Music is the largest employer of professional musicians in the UK. Read more about what they do, and how to join the professionals, at http://www.army.mod.uk/music.

The British Army offers world-class training and the opportunity to travel. Being a musician with the Corps of Army Music is just one of 220 roles available. Visit http://www.army.mod.uk/join to find out about becoming a full-time or part-time soldier — and to complete your online application.

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE (1854)


The Charge of the Light Brigade (1854)

The Charge of the Light Brigade, immortalized in Alfred, Lord Tennyson‘s poem of the same name, was an ill-advised British cavalry assault on Russian forces during the Crimean War. As a result of miscommunication, British soldiers advanced on heavily armed Russian troops who thought their attackers must be drunk. Though hundreds of British soldiers were killed or injured in this battle, their commander, the Earl of Cardigan, not only survived but did what immediately after the battle? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: PADDY ROY BATES FOUNDS HIS OWN NATION (1967)


Paddy Roy Bates Founds His Own Nation (1967)

The Principality of Sealand is a purported micronation located on Roughs Tower, a World War II-era British sea fort located in the North Sea six miles (10 km) off the coast of Suffolk, England. Since 1966, the installation has been occupied by the associates and family of Paddy Roy Bates, a former British Army major and pirate radio broadcaster who claimed it as a sovereign and independent state in 1967. What is the international community’s position on the fort’s status as a sovereign nationMore… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: RENOWNED SURGEON JAMES BARRY DIES, REVEALING LIFELONG SECRET (1865)


Renowned Surgeon James Barry Dies, Revealing Lifelong Secret (1865)

During the 19th century, Barry was a top British military surgeon who worked to improve conditions during the Crimean War. Known for a fiery temper, Barry famously argued with Florence Nightingale and fought in at least one duel. After Barry’s death, a maid claimed that in the course of preparing the corpse for burial she had learned that Barry was actually a woman, but the British Army sealed all records on Barry for 100 years. What was revealed when the records were accessed in the 1950s? More… Discuss