Tag Archives: British Museum

Today In History: What Happened This Day In History (Tuesday, February 10, 2015)


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 10

1258   Huegu, a Mongol leader, seizes Baghdad, bringing and end to the Abbasid caliphate.
1620   Supporters of Marie de Medici, the queen mother, who has been exiled to Blois, are defeated by the king’s troops at Ponts de Ce, France.
1763   The Treaty of Paris ends the French-Indian War. France gives up all her territories in the New World except New Orleans and a few scattered islands.
1799   Napoleon Bonaparte leaves Cairo, Egypt, for Syria, at the head of 13,000 men.
1814   Napoleon personally directs lightning strikes against enemy columns advancing toward Paris, beginning with a victory over the Russians at Champaubert.
1840   Queen Victoria marries Prince Albert.
1846   Led by religious leader Brigham Young, the first Mormons begin a long westward exodus from Nauvoo, Il., to Utah.
1863   P.T. Barnum’s star midgets, Tom Thumb and Lavinia Warren, are married.
1904   Russia and Japan declare war on each other.
1915   President Wilson blasts the British for using the U.S. flag on merchant ships to deceive the Germans.
1939   Japanese occupy island of Hainan in French Indochina.
1941   London severs diplomatic relations with Romania.
1941   Iceland is attacked by German planes.
1942   The war halts civilian car production at Ford.
1945   B-29s hit the Tokyo area.
1955   Bell Aircraft displays a fixed-wing vertical takeoff plane.
1960   Adolph Coors, the beer brewer, is kidnapped in Golden, Colo.
1966   Protester David Miller is convicted of burning his draft card.
1979   The Metropolitan Museum announces the first major theft in 110-year history, $150,000 Greek marble head.
1986   The largest Mafia trial in history, with 474 defendants, opens in Palermo, Italy.
Born on February 10
1890  

Boris Pasternak, Russian novelist and poet (Dr. Zhivago).  (Listen to Doctor Zhivago, by Boris Pastenak on euzicasa! just click on the shortcut above!)

1893   Jimmy Durante, American comedian and film actor.
1894   Harold MacMillan, British prime minister (1957-1963).
1897   John F. Enders, virologist.
1898   Bertolt Brecht, German poet and dramatist (The Threepenny Opera).
1901   Stella Adler, actress and teacher.
1902   Walter Brattain, physicist, one of the inventors of the transistor.
1910   Dominique Georges Pire, Belgian cleric and educator.
1914   Larry Adler, harmonica virtuoso.
1920   Alex Comfort, English physician and author (Joy of Sex).
1927   (Mary Violet) Leontyne Price, opera singer.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.9xy5kPzI.dpuf

“VEGHEAȚI SĂ NU MI SE PIARDĂ CÂNTECELE”: Ion Voicu – Balada de Ciprian Porumbescu (Ballad for violin and orchestra), great compositions/performances


Ion Voicu – Balada de Ciprian Porumbescu (Ballad for violin and orchestra)

this day in history: The British Museum Opens (1759)


The British Museum Opens (1759)

When the British Museum opened to the public in 1759, its exhibits were based largely on personal collections, including Sir Hans Sloane‘s Cabinet of Curiosities, Robert Harley’s library, and Sir Robert Cotton‘s antiquities. Today, the museum is home to more than 13 million historical items. Its assortment of prints and drawings is one of the world’s finest, and it houses such famous relics as the Rosetta Stone and the Elgin Marbles. Why is the ownership of the latter collection in dispute? More… Discuss

this pressed: BBC News – Elgin Marbles: British Museum loans statue to Russia


The British Museum has loaned one of the Elgin Marbles statues to Russia.

The British Museum has loaned one of the Elgin Marbles statues to Russia.

A headless depiction of the river god Ilissos will go on display in St Petersburg‘s State Hermitage Museum until mid-January.

It is one of a number of relics acquired by Lord Elgin in Athens in the early 19th Century now known collectively as the Elgin Marbles.

Ownership of the artefacts, once part of the 2,500-year-old Parthenon temple, is disputed by Greece.

It maintains that Lord Elgin removed them illegally while the country was under Turkish occupation as part of the Ottoman Empire.

The items have remained in the British Museum ever since.

Continue reading the main story

“Start Quote

The greatest things in the world should be… shared and enjoyed by as many people in as many countries as possible”

Neil McGregor Director, British Museum

The museum director, Neil McGregor, said: “The British Museum is a museum of the world, for the world and nothing demonstrates this more than the loan of a Parthenon sculpture to the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg to celebrate its 250th anniversary.”

In a blog for the museum’s website, he wrote that the British Museum had opened its doors in 1759 and the Hermitage just five years later – making them “almost twins… the first great museums of the European Enlightenment“.

The British Museum was today “the most generous lender in the world”, he said, “making a reality of the Enlightenment ideal that the greatest things in the world should be seen and studied, shared and enjoyed by as many people in as many countries as possible”.

“The trustees have always believed that such loans must continue between museums in spite of political disagreements between governments.”

He added: “When our colleagues at the Hermitage asked if we might also make an important loan to celebrate their 250th anniversary, the Trustees immediately answered yes.

“And no loan could more fittingly mark the long friendship of our two houses, or the period of their founding, than a sculpture from the Parthenon.”

via BBC News – Elgin Marbles: British Museum loans statue to Russia.

Guide Dogs


Guide Dogs

Guide dogs are service dogs that have been specially trained to help the visually impaired safely navigate their environments. The first school for guide dogs was established by the German government after World War I to provide service dogs to blinded veterans. Schools now exist in several European countries and in the US, where the pioneer Seeing Eye, Inc., founded by Dorothy Harrison Eustis in 1929, is one of the best known. What breeds are most frequently trained to be guide dogs? More… Discuss

Quotation: Jerome K. Jerome about marriage


Brains are at a discount in the married state. There is no demand for them, no appreciation even.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927)

 

The Royal Library of Ashurbanipal


The Royal Library of Ashurbanipal

The Royal Library of Ashurbanipal in Nineveh was the first systematically organized library in West Asia. It was created by Ashurbanipal, the last great Assyrian king, who reigned in the 7th century BCE and controlled most of the then-known world. Excavations at the site have uncovered thousands of clay tablets constituting today’s chief source of knowledge about ancient Mesopotamia. The collection includes historical and scientific literature, flood and creation myths, and what famous epic? More… Discuss