Tag Archives: British

today’s holiday: Yemen Revolution Days


Yemen Revolution Days

Yemen observes two Revolution Days: one commemorates the revolutionary movement that overthrew the monarchy of Imam Muhammad al-Badr on September 26, 1962, and helped pave the way for the creation of the Yemen Arab Republic. Before that could occur, however, British occupation of the area remained another force impeding independence. Revolts against the British then ensued in 1962-63, and, by 1967, the British granted Yemen its sovereignty. These revolts are commemorated on October 14. More… Discuss

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this day in the yesteryear: Battle of Waterloo: Napoleon’s Last Battle (1815)


Battle of Waterloo: Napoleon’s Last Battle (1815)

After returning from exile at Elba, Napoleon reinstalled himself on the throne of France. As he traveled to Paris to take power, a coalition of European powers organized against him. On June 18, Napoleon began a direct offensive against British forces, but the British held the line until Prussian troops arrived, marking a turning point in the battle. Routed, the French retreated, and Napoleon left the field and signed his second abdication. To what continent did he allegedly try to escape? More… Discuss

quotation: “The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.” William Shakespeare


The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare – “The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.”


The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Robert Louis Stevenson


I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: JOMO KENYATTA SENTENCED TO SEVEN YEARS HARD LABOR (1953)


Jomo Kenyatta Sentenced to Seven Years Hard Labor (1953)

Kenyatta was an African political leader and the first president of an independent Kenya. His activities were integral to the effort to liberate Kenya from British colonial rule. In 1953, British leaders sentenced Kenyatta to seven years in prison for his suspected ties to the Mau Mau guerilla organization. Released in 1959, he participated in negotiations with the British to write a new constitution for Kenya, which became independent in 1963. What did he achieve during his 14-year presidency? More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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QUOTATION: George Eliot


Animals are such agreeable friends – they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Friendship is constant in all other things Save in the office and affairs of love.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

 

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NEW AT EUZICASA: WIDGET <<>>


SHAKESPEARE NAVIGATOR A MUST HAVE WIDGET!

SHAKESPEARE NAVIGATOR A MUST HAVE WIDGET! (YOU ARE ONE CLICK AWAY!)

 

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QUOTATION: Francis Bacon


Revenge triumphs over death; love slights it; honor aspireth to it; grief flieth to it; fear preoccupateth it.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

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QUOTATION: George Eliot ABOUT A TYRANT


If a man means to be hard, let him keep in his saddle and speak from that height, above the level of pleading eyes, and with the command of a distant horizon.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot about conceited people


I’ve never any pity for conceited people, because I think they carry their comfort about with them.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot (1819-1880)


It is well known to all experienced minds that our firmest convictions are often dependent on subtle impressions for which words are quite too coarse a medium.

George Eliot (1819-1880)

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot ON SAFETY


A man will tell you that he has worked in a mine for forty years unhurt by an accident as a reason why he should apprehend no danger, though the roof is beginning to sink.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

George Eliot


What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other?

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Quotation: Francis Bacon on being born and dying


It is as natural to die, as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful, as the other.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

Quotation: Francis Bacon (good old times…)


There is no vice that doth so cover a man with shame, as to be found false and perfidious.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

 

Quotation: George Eliot


Men’s lives are as thoroughly blended with each other as the air they breathe: evil spreads as necessarily as disease.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Quotation: Francis Bacon about trust


The greatest trust, between man and man, is the trust of giving counsel. For in other confidences, men commit the parts of life; their lands, their goods … some particular affair; but to such as they make their counselors, they commit the whole.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

 

AVERAGENESS


Averageness

In studies of attractiveness, researchers have found that average faces—those with the most conventional traits—are rated as the most attractive. Such studies often use composite photography, a tool developed in the 19th century by Sir Francis Galton, who believed that he could use composite images to identify “types” by facial appearance. Hypothesizing that certain types have similar facial features, he began creating composite photos of the faces of criminals and vegetarians. What did he find? More… Discuss

 

Quotation: George Eliot on communicating feelings


Examine your words well, and you will find that even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Quotation of the Day: Francis Bacon – How to Paradise (on Paradise Lost)


The desire of power in excess caused the angels to fall; the desire of knowledge in excess caused man to fall.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

My take on this: The Garden of Eden might have been a place of bliss (ignorant of Power and Knowledge.) What good are they both if they displace you from your natural place: The fruits of power and knowledge are deemed to fall out of grace and loose it.

Today’s Quotation: Francis Bacon (156101626) – On Fortune


If a man look sharply and attentively, he shall see Fortune; for though she be blind, yet she is not invisible.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

My take on this: It’s all up in the air, actually…And of course, Fortune can mean different things, to different folks.

Today’s Quotation: George Eliot (1819-1880)


Don’t let us rejoice in punishment, even when the hand of God alone inflicts it. The best of us are but poor wretches, just saved from shipwreck: can we feel anything but awe and pity when we see a fellow-passenger swallowed by the waves?
(From Scenes of Clerical Life by George Eliot–1858–Book 3–Chapter 22. The story was originally published in 1858 in Blackwood’s Magazine. The first edition of the novel was published in 1910 after she passed away.)
George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Today’s Quotation: George Eliot – On Truth and Lie


Falsehood is so easy, truth so difficult.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

The above quote comes from “Adam Bede“–Book Two–Chapter XVII–1859. The quote is in the fifth paragraph.

Read the book at: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/507/507-h/507-h.htm#2HCH0017

Find Out more about George Eliot a
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Eliot