Tag Archives: Bucharest

George Enescu – Rapsodia Romana Nr. 1 (completa) dirijor Sergiu Celibidache , great compositions/performances


George Enescu – Rapsodia Romana Nr. 1 (completa) dirijor Sergiu Celibidache

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Munti mei, cugetare poetica de George-B ( euzicasa – The smudge and other poems page)


Muntii mei acum sant dealuri,

sant micuti, si ca o cusma-

asa ca an din an imi par tot mai falnici, si salbatici.

dar nu ma las prejos,
nu ma indoi sub greutatea zilei,

si nu astept munte sau deal sa vina, 

sa mi-seartearna-n poala,

ci ma rog ca muntii falnici,
chiar de-ar fi pentru furnici,
sa-mi aduca bucuria,

ce-am stiut pe Moldoveanu,
si
fecior fiind , de zile  eram plin!

 

Pe acoperisul Romaniei: Varful Moldoveanu

“Parcurgerea crestei dintre Vârful Viştea – 2527 metri şi Vârful Moldoveanu – 2544 metri reprezinta traversarea  ‘AcoperişuluiRomâniei.’ ”   (Toate drepturile sant acordate autorului acestei fotografii: va rog sa activati accesul la articolul sau apasand oriunde pe imagine…este atat de simplu!)

 

Festivalul Cetelor de Feciori Fagaras 2015


Festivalul Cetelor de Feciori Fagaras 2015

Colinde de Craciun -Madrigal Bucharest choir – Three kings – Romanian Carol: great compositions/performances


Colinde de Craciun -Madrigal Bucharest choir – Three kings – Romanian Carol

Barcarolle from ‘Les contes d’Hoffmann’ by Offenbach


http://anisionogueira.com/:no reblogging without express permission! - all posts are copyright by George Bost-view on euzicasa.

http://anisionogueira.com/: no reblogging without express permission! – all posts are copyright by George Bost -View on euzicasa.

[youtube.com/watch?v=is0Lb4cj_3c]

Barcarolle from ‘Les contes d’Hoffmann‘ by Offenbach

Soprano Irina Iordachescu and mezzosoprano Cristina Iordachescu – Iordache – two sisters singing the Barcarolle from ‘Les contes d’Hoffmann’ by Offenbach, together with pianist Gonul Apdula, in the wonderful Concert Hall of ‘The Sutu Palace’ from Bucharest.

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7 buruieni numai bune de inclus în meniu – Yahoo Ştiri România


7 buruieni numai bune de inclus în meniu – Yahoo Ştiri România.

Plantain. In childhood, we treat abrasions, scratches and bruises plantain leaves freshly picked. This plant can be used in the kitchen but in salads, stews and soups. However, in addition to leaves, inflorescence and seeds are edible. Seeds, dried and ground are a rich source of fiber and are effective in the treatment of constipation. “

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HISTORIC MUSICAL MOMENTS: Clara Haskil: Schumann – ‘Abegg’ Variations, Op. 1


[youtube.com/watch?v=UqOvdlthl8E]

Clara Haskil: Schumann – ‘Abegg’ Variations, Op. 1

Clara Haskil (7 January 1895 – 7 December 1960) was a Romanian classical pianist, renowned as an interpreter of the classical and early romantic repertoire. Haskil was particularly noted for her performances and recordings of Mozart. Many considered her the foremost interpreter of Mozart in her time. She was also noted as a superb interpreter of Beethoven, Schumann, and Scarlatti. Haskil was born into a Sephardic Jewish family in Bucharest, Romania and studied in Vienna under Richard Robert (whose memorable pupils also included Rudolf Serkin and George Szell) and briefly with Ferruccio Busoni. She later moved to Paris, where she started studying with Gabriel Fauré’s pupil Joseph Morpain, whom she always credited as one of her greatest influences. The same year she entered the Paris Conservatoire, officially to study with Alfred Cortot although most of her instruction came from Lazare Lévy and Mme Giraud-Letarse, and graduated at age 15 with a Premier Prix. She also graduated with a Premier Prix in violin. Upon graduating, Haskil began to tour Europe, though her career was cut short by one of the numerous physical ailments she suffered throughout her life. In 1913 she was fitted with a plaster cast in an attempt to halt the progression of scoliosis. Frequent illnesses, combined with extreme stage fright that appeared in 1920, kept her from critical or financial success. Most of her life was spent in abject poverty. It was not until after World War II, during a series of concerts in the Netherlands in 1949, that she began to win acclaim. Well regarded as a chamber musician, Haskil collaborated with such famed musicians as George Enescu, Eugène Ysaÿe, Pablo Casals, Joseph Szigeti, Géza Anda, Isaac Stern and Arthur Grumiaux, with whom she played her last concert. While renowned primarily as a violinist, Grumiaux was also a fine pianist, and he and Haskil would sometimes swap instruments. She played as a soloist under the baton of such conductors as Ansermet, Barbirolli, Baumgartner, Beecham, Boult, Celibidache, Cluytens, Fricsay, Giulini, Inghelbrecht, Jochum, Karajan, Kempe, Klemperer, Kubelík, Markevitch, Monteux, Münch, Paray, Rosbaud, Sawallisch, Solti, Stokowski, Szell, among many others. One of her most prominent performances as a soloist with an orchestra is recording of Mozart’s Piano Concertos Nos. 20 and 24 in November 1960 with Orchestre des Concerts Lamoureux conducted by Igor Markevitch (issued on CD by Philips Classics under No. 464 718-2); this recording features an unusually slow, pensive performance of K466’s part III and a very subtle, highly lyrical and yet, in some way, vigorous playing of K491’s part II. Haskil died from injuries received through a fall at the staircase of a Brussels train station. She was to play a concert with Arthur Grumiaux the following day. An esteemed friend of Haskil, Charles Chaplin, described her talent by saying “In my lifetime I have met three geniuses; Professor Einstein, Winston Churchill, and Clara Haskil. I am not a trained musician but I can only say that her touch was exquisite, her expression wonderful, and her technique extraordinary.” (Swiss Radio interview, 19 April 1961.) The Clara Haskil International Piano Competition is held biannually in her memory. The brochure reads: “The Clara Haskil Competition was founded in 1963 to honour and perpetuate the memory of the incomparable Swiss pianist, of Romanian origin, who was born in Bucharest in 1895. It takes place every two years in Vevey, Switzerland, where Clara Haskil resided from 1942 until her death in Brussels in 1960. A street in Vevey bears her name. The Competition welcomes young pianists from all over the world, who pursue the musical ideal that is inspired by Clara Haskil and which will always remain exemplary.”… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clara_Ha…

A link to this wonderful artists personal Website: http://www.deccaclassics.com/cat/sing…

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Vizitatori Romani la EuZicAsa (ori vizitati ClustrMap on the site): Multami fain va zic la toti si binecuvantari de St. Constantin si Elena!


Romania (RO) 4,782
  Bucuresti 1,459
  Satu Mare 300
  Timis 276
  Cluj 184
  Brasov 174
  Iasi 113
  Constanta 108
  Bistrita-Nasaud 103
  Suceava 95
  Galati 95
  Bihor 89
  Prahova 82
  Sibiu 80
  Valcea 74
  Mures 70
  Hunedoara 69
  Olt 69
  Vaslui 68
  Braila 62
  Dambovita 62
  Arad 60
  Dolj 60
  Giurgiu 58
  Maramures 57
  Neamt 46
  Botosani 45
  Bacau 40
  Arges 36
  Alba 34
  Ilfov 32
  Buzau 31
  Tulcea 30
  Calarasi 29
  Caras-Severin 28
  Vrancea 22
  Salaj 20
  Harghita 19
  Mehedinti 16
  Gorj 14
  Teleorman 11
  Covasna 8
  Ialomita 8
  N/A 446
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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: David Ohanesian – I Pagliacci – Prologo


[youtube.com/watch?v=rkNNPtQ8aQI]

De la Wikipedia, enciclopedia liberă

David Ohanesian (n. 6 ianuarie 1927, București – d. 30 septembrie 2007, București) a fost un bariton român care, alături de Octav Enigărescu și Nicolae Herlea, a făcut parte din triada de aur a celor mai mari baritoni ai României.

David Ohanesian, foto: Mihai Cosma

În decursul carierei sale artistice a jucat în peste 2.000 de spectacole de operă, interpretând peste 40 de roluri și primind numeroase premii și distincții. A cântat pe marile scene ale lumii, alături de alți mari interpreți ca Luciano Pavarotti, Montserrat Caballe, Placido Domingo, Leontyne Price sau Birgit Nilsson. A rămas memorabilă interpretarea sa în rolul Oedip, din opera cu același nume de George Enescu, care i-a adus renumele de cel mai apreciat Oedip al secolului al XX-lea.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

David Ohanesian (born January 6, 1927, Bucharest – died September 30, 2007, Bucharest) was a Romanian baritone who alongside Octav Enigărescu and Nicholas Herlea, was part of the golden triad of the greatest baritones of Romania.
David Ohanesian, Photo: Mihai Cosma

During his artistic career he played in more than 2,000 opera, playing over 40 roles and received numerous awards and accolades. He played on the great stages of the world, along with other great artists like Luciano Pavarotti, Montserrat Caballe, Placido Domingo, Leontyne Price and Birgit Nilsson. He remained in the role of Oedipus memorable interpretation of the work of the same name by George Enescu, who earned the reputation of Oedipus appreciated the twentieth century.

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: George Enescu – Romanian Rhapsody n° 2 in D major, Op. 11 (Orchestre de Montbéliard, Paul Staïcu)



The first Romanian Rhapsody composed at 19 years (together with a second one, both bearing the opus number 11) gained a worldwide fame for its lovely folk tunes (in fact, all Enescu’s works are imbued with such folk lightmotifs) and vivid Romanian rhythms, becoming definitely the best known of all his compositions. Here the Rhapsody No.2 is performed with an infectious empathy by the Romanian conductor Paul Staïcu along with his outstanding musicians of Montbéliard Philharmonic Orchestra.  The performance reveals a mighty symphonist with a keen sense of colours and orchestral textures, a rigorous and honest one devoted to principles and truth, extracting the sap of his composition from folk melodies of his people.  The reputed conductor Paul Staïcu has signed a series of recordings devoted to the complete orchestral oeuvres of his fellow compatriot.  The celebrated Romanian Rhapsody in D major op.11 , more reflexive than its pair no.1, the second Romanian Rhapsody is also a youthful work (written in 1900, when the composer was 19) with persistent folk aromas and picturesque suggestions, aiming at fructifying the popular Romanian musical treasure and meditative side of its sentimentality. The rhapsodic character compounds its appeal and favours its reception by audiences. It is a composition putting grave questions and depicting outrageous realities, filtered through a sensitive conscience. It conveys the sufferance of a moral man facing the immorality of a corrupt and pointless world, reflecting on duties and faiths, on life’s sense and destiny. The torturing mood is magisterially recreated by the inspired baton of Paul Staïcu, the main themes flow unceasingly with a desolating vigour and reach finally a concluding climax affirming an undefeated hope in the majesty of mankind.

  

The Romanian Athenaeum, at about the time of the Rhapsodies’ premiere there in 1903

The two Romanian Rhapsodies, Op. 11, for orchestra, are George Enescu‘s best-known compositions. They were both written in 1901, and first performed together in 1903. The two rhapsodies, and particularly the first, have long held a permanent place in the repertory of every major orchestra. They employ elements of lăutărească music, vivid Romanian rhythms, and an air of spontaneity. They exhibit exotic modal coloring, with some scales having ‘mobile’ thirds, sixths or sevenths, creating a shifting major/minor atmosphere, one of the characteristics of Romanian lăutărească music.[1][not in citation given] They also incorporate some material found in the later drafts of his Poème roumaine, Op. 1.[2]

File:Ateneul Român stage.jpg

The stage of the Athenaeum in Bucharest

The two Romanian Rhapsodies were composed in Paris, and premiered together in a concert at the Romanian Athenaeumin Bucharest which also included the world premiere of Enescu’s First Suite for Orchestra, Op. 9 (1903). The composer conducted all three of his own works, which were preceded on the programme by Berlioz’s Overture to Les francs-jugesand Schumann’s Symphony No. 1, both conducted by Eduard Wachmann. The concert took place on 23 February 1903[3](according to the Julian calendar in use in Romania at that time; 8 March 1903 Gregorian).[4] The Second Rhapsody was played first, and Enescu maintained this order of performance throughout his life.[5]

Rhapsody No. 2 in D major

The Second Rhapsody, like the first, was completed in 1901,[14][7] but is more inward and reflective. Its essential character is not dance, but song.[15][5] It is based on the popular 19th-century ballad “Pe o stîncă neagră, într-un vechi castel” (“On a dark rock, in an old castle”) which, like the opening melody of the First Rhapsody Enescu may have learned from the lăutar Chioru,[1] though again there is some doubt whether Enescu actually remembered it from Chioru.[10] After a development culminating in a canonic presentation, this theme is joined by a dance tune, “Sîrba lui Pompieru” (“Sîrba of the Fireman”), followed shortly afterward by the second half of a folksong, “Văleu, lupu mă mănîncă” (“Aiee, I’m being devoured by a wolf!”), which is treated in canon.[16] Toward the end there is a brief moment of animation, bringing to mind the spirit of country lăutari, but the work ends quietly.[17]

Unlike the First Rhapsody, there is no controversy at all about the scoring of the Second, which is given in the published score as: 3 flutes, 2 oboes, cor anglais, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets in C, 3 trombones, 2 timpani, cymbal, 2 harps, first violins, second violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.[18]

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Corul Madrigal Pe carare sub un brad D.G.Kiriac) “…ca dragostea n-are leac decat ochii care-ti plac!…)


Great Compositions/Performances:  Corul Madrigal Pe carare sub un brad D.G.Kiriac) “…ca dragostea n-are leac decat ochii care-ti plac!…)

 

English: the eyes Français : les yeux Deutsch:...

English: the eyes Français : les yeux Deutsch: die Augen (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

http://www.bestmusic.ro
http://www.electrecord.ro

Buy this song on http://www.triplu.ro

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Dumitru Georgescu Kiriac (18 March 1866 – 8 January 1928) was a Romanian composer, conductor, and ethnomusicologist.[1] He was particularly known for his sacred choral works and art songs which were based on the Romanian Orthodox tradition and Romanian folklore.[2]

Kiriac was born in Bucharest and began his musical studies at the Bucharest Conservatory (now the National University of Music) with Gheorghe Brătianu (1847 – 1905) and Eduard Wachmann (1836 – 1908). From 1892 to 1899 he studied in Paris with Vincent d’Indy at the Schola Cantorum de Paris and with Charles-Marie Widor and Gabriel Fauré at the Paris Conservatory. It was during this time that he began collecting Romanian children’s folk songs. On his return to Bucharest in 1900 he became a professor at the Bucharest Conservatory. The following year he founded the Romanian choral society, Carmen.[2][3]

Kiriac died in his native city at the age of 61. He was considered one of the founders of modern Romanian music.[4] Festivalul Internaţional de Muzică Corală “D.G. Kiriac”, an international festival of sacred choral music held annually in the city of Pitești, is named in his honour as is the city’s male voice choir.[5]

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ROMANIA – Travel and Tourism Information


Romania's Castles and Fortresses - The Fortress of Rasnov (near Brasov, Romania)ROMANIA – Travel and Tourism Information.

 

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Colind Andra – Deschide usa crestine



Colind Andra – Deschide usa crestine K-Lumea.net

 

Bucharest City Tour



Masterminds.ro & Yony_Ro presents you the capital of Romania as you never seen it before! 

Video by: Masterminds.ro
http://www.masterminds.ro
Photos by: yony_ro
http://www.flickr.com/photos/40873435…
Music by: George Enescu 
(Romanian Rhapsody no. 1)

A High Definition video which will make you see how Bucharest really is! You will feel the real Romanian passion for art, culture and life itself!
Bring closer a glass of red wine, turn the sound volume just a bit higher than normal.. now relax and enjoy the following 10 minutes..

 

Fabulous Compositions: Romanian Rhapsody No. 1 by George Enescu



The author of this beautiful video has chosen a ever so truthful account of  the country and the people of Romania, now and throughout the ages old history, for which am very thankful:

“Pentru mine, Enescu va rămâne una din veritabilele minuni ale lumii.
(…) Rădăcinile puternice şi nobleţea sufletului său sunt provenite din
propria lui ţară, o ţară de inegalată frumuseţe.” Yehudi Menuhin

Just a thought:  “Yehudi Menuhin’s quotation refers to the best known, and loved Romanian poet Mihai Eminescu:  Nevertheless, I believe that George Enescu achieved in his Romanian Rhapsodies a portrayal of the people of Romania that no one else ever was able to describe with so much humanity, in the language of music what Eminescu did by employing the romantic poetry of the  Romanian language.” George-B 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gaspars/…

Patricia Kopatchinskaja – George Enescu Violin Sonata No.3, Op.25


 

Hymn to the Theotokos at Sinaia Monastery in Romania



Pilgrims singing in Sinaia monastery church in Romania

 

Image

Biserica de Lemn – Muzeul Satului, Bucharest – Herastrau (Around 1972) (my photography collection)


Biserica de lemn-Muzeul Satului Bucharest -Parcull Herastrau, Cisca 1972

Biserica de lemn-Muzeul Satului Bucharest -Parcull Herastrau, Cisca 1972:

History: I took this picture with 18X24  (1/2 size 35 mm camera), all manual and developed  it myself. The print is now 41 years old, but in best quality (4 X 5 in.).
I scanned it with a HP 6300 series “all in one”, printer-copier-scanner, with 600 resolution, and retouched it with FastStone Editor.

History

Comic strip festival showcases Eastern Europe revival (From France24 International)


Comic strip festival showcases Eastern Europe revival (From France24 International)

Comic strip festival showcases Eastern Europe revival (From France24 International) CLick here to find out more about this story)

AFP – The European Comics Festival opened Friday in Bucharest with a spotlight on the medium’s revival in Eastern Europe after decades in the wilderness under communism.

“In every totalitarian regime, comic strips were reserved to children, and only a handful of ‘authorised’ novels were adapted for adults,” said Jean Auquier, director of the Belgian Comic Strip Centre, in Bucharest for the festival.

“But since the fall of the communist dictatorships in Eastern Europe, the long tradition that had existed before for the comic strip is being revived,” Auquier told AFP.

Fifteen Eastern European artists are featured at the festival alongside Belgian, Portuguese, Greek and French exhibitors in a trendy industrial building transformed into a contemporary art space in downtown Bucharest.
(
Source: http://www.france24.com/en/20111104-comic-strip-festival-showcases-eastern-europe-revival?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter)

Gheorghe Zamfir: Plays Unchained Melody Arrangement For Nai (PanFlute)


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The pan flute is called  “nai”, in Romanian and it became renown  due to Gheorghe Zamfir, who’s biography can be accessed here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gheorghe_Zamfir


Also you can access the following link:  http://www.panflutejedi.com/levni.html,
 information about the origins and evolution of the pan flute.

What I think that Mr. Zamfir did with the pan flute is close to the evolution of the harpsichord to the grand piano. It is virtuosity at its best.  

Dumitru Fărcaş – Bărbătesc din Maramureş


Camellia Flower

click to enlarge


Please forgive me as I find myself sometimes reposting and reposting music, like this elders dance from  (one of the many distinctive folkloric identities within the family of Romanians: I just cannot help, nor celebrating the treasures of our larger than life soul thru the soft instrument: the tarragot, and masterfully interpreted by Dumitru Farcas. I really think that the value of this music are too larger than the Mioritic Space, we Romanians like to refer to as our land, water, air and life within our ever changing physical, and man-marked borders. So, out there in the immensity of the Earth, our larger than soul home, we too should remember a little of our treasure chest of traditions and keep them alive: They are too beautiful not to sing from all mountaintops.

Eu Zic Asa: “Sa ne tina Dumnezeu Dragutu pe toti si intotdeauna aproape de Harul Lui, ca un parinte iubitor.”

Tatal Nostru Care Ne Esti In Ceruri, Sfinteasca-se Numele Tau!

Tatal Nostru Prayer

 

Streit’s German Bakery


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If you are close   to S-E corner of the of Imperial Highway and Paramount Blvd, in Downey, you can treat yourself to a unique experience, by visiting Streit’s German Bakery: I buy my bread from there, and it is the only place bread tastes the way it used to when I was growing up, back in Bucharest. The house I was born in was close to  the bread factory, and our teachers were finding several times each year reasons to revisit there: The taste of bread freshly baked, that was the reason. Many times the smell of bread from the factory would come downwind, some three quarters  of a mile, and into our classrooms.

But back to Streit’s Bakery: Beside the most delicious pastries, of French, Austrian, and German recipes, they make the most beautiful and delicious wedding cakes, and as you can see from the pictures, also Christmas gingerbread doll houses, all handmade, of fresh, all to the order. It is one of those places where is hard to comprehend how all these thinks are made: but they have great decorators, as you can see. Napoleons, cream puffs, eclaires, double chocolate fudge cakes…So delicious, they can compete with the finest european and continental deserts. Also they make Christmas walnuts rolls, just like my grandma used to make, long time ago.
I hope they will be there for many years to come.

Give it a try friends if it is in your way.