Tag Archives: California

Route 66

Route 66

Also known as the “The Main Street of America,” Route 66 was established in 1926 and ran from Chicago, Illinois, in a south-westerly direction to Los Angeles, California, for a total of 2,448 miles (3,939 km). It was a major path of the migrants who went west, especially during the 1930s, and it supported the economies of the communities through which it passed. More direct routes and increasingly sophisticated engineering techniques led to its being decommissioned in what year? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First Drive-In Theater Opens in New Jersey (1933)

First Drive-In Theater Opens in New Jersey (1933)

The drive-in theater was the creation of New Jersey chemical company magnate Richard M. Hollingshead, Jr. In 1932, Hollingshead nailed a screen to trees in his backyard and set a projector on the hood of his car. After applying for a patent for his creation, Hollingshead opened the first drive-in the next year. Though it only operated for three years, the concept soon caught on in other states. How many drive-ins are estimated to have existed in the US at the height of their popularity? More… Discuss

+ ICYMI @washingtonpost tally of fatal police shootings includes 49 people who had no weapon — ProPublica (@ProPublica) June 2, 2015

The Winchester Mystery House

The Winchester Mystery House

The Winchester Mystery House is a famous California mansion that is reputed to be haunted. Sarah Winchester, the widow of a gun magnate, began building the Winchester Mystery House in 1884 after a medium advised her to construct a house to appease the ghosts of all those killed by Winchester rifles. Construction continued for 38 years, since Sarah Winchester believed that if she stopped working on the house, she would die. What significance does the number 13 have in the mansion? More… Discuss

today holiday/celebration: Calaveras County Fair and Frog Jumping Jubilee

Calaveras County Fair and Frog Jumping Jubilee

Cave Formation at California Caverns in the Si...

Cave Formation at California Caverns in the Sierra Foothills, Calaveras County (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


This event is a four-day county fair, established in 1928, at the Frogtown Fairgrounds near Angels Camp, California. It includes the official, original frog-jumping contest based on Mark Twain’s story, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” as well as a children’s parade, livestock competitions, a professional rodeo, a demolition derby, fireworks, and art exhibits. About 3,500 frogs are jumped in daily contests leading up to the Grand Finals on Sunday, in which there are 75 to 100 frog contestants. More… Discuss





today’s holiday: Frost Saints’ Days

Frost Saints’ Days

These three consecutive days in May mark the feasts of St. Mammertus, St. Pancras, and St. Servatus. In the wine-growing districts of France, a severe cold spell occasionally strikes at this time of year, inflicting serious damage on the grapevines; some in rural France have believed that it is the result of their having offended one of the three saints, who for this reason are called the “frost saints.” French farmers have been known to show their displeasure over a cold snap at this time of year by flogging the statues and defacing the pictures of Mammertus, Pancras, and Servatus. More… Discuss

Dust Bowl: Dust Storm Hits Great Plains (1934) (Watch the documentary!)

Dust Bowl: Dust Storm Hits Great Plains (1934)

In the 1930s, severe drought conditions in the Great Plains region of the US and decades of farming without crop rotation led to a series of devastating dust storms. The storms, called “dusters” or “black blizzards,” caused widespread ecological and agricultural damage. In May 1934, one of the worst storms to hit the Dust Bowl blew massive amounts of Great Plains topsoil all the way to the East Coast and dumped the equivalent of how many pounds of debris on Chicago, Illinois? More… Discuss

Stinging Dust & Forgotten Lives: The Dust Bowl (2008)

Uploaded on Aug 30, 2011

Ponder for a moment that you are huddled around a dimly lit lamp in a vast dusty room with your family. All eyes have a look of fear from the gusty winds shaking your home. The next morning, after the storm blows over, you look outside to find your house, barn, animals, fence, and water well have all been buried by feet of soil. All is lost. You must live…but how?

Over a hundred years ago people left the American east to find a better life. They migrated and established homestead throughout the Great Plains. There, they would prosper with fields of plenty, until, they exhausted the land. Again, they migrated westward to find a better life and provide opportunities for their starving children. STINGING DUST & FORGOTTEN LIVES presents the effects of the Dust Bowl on humanity during the 1930s. Meteorological conditions are often the first to blame, however, it was economic gain of the nation that doubled the unfortunate fate of the dusters.

For more information visit tcpfilms.com/​sdfl

Copyright 2008 by Cameron Douglas Craig and Kevin Harker Jeanes

From The Hill: Peppergrass trail 360 VIEW (Puente Hills (Whittier) Nature Preserve Authority): Let’s Go Hiking!

Peppergrass trail 360 VIEW (Puente Hills (Whittier) Nature Preserve Authority): Let’s Go Hiking!

Biography: Pepe Romero, World Renouned Classic Guitar Player

Pepe Romero

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaPepe Romero (born March 8, 1944 in Málaga, Spain) is a world-renowned classical and flamenco guitarist. He is particularly famous for his outstanding technique and colorful musical interpretations on the instrument.

Pepe Romero
Pepe Romero 2000.JPG

Pepe Romero in 2000
Background information
Born March 8, 1944 (age 71)
Málaga, Spain
Genres Classical music, flamenco
Occupation(s) Guitarist, arranger
Instruments Guitar
Years active fl. ca. 1959 – present
Labels Philips Records
Associated acts The Romero Guitar Quartet
Website www.peperomero.com
Notable instruments
Torres 1856


As a soloist Pepe Romero has appeared in the United States, Canada, Europe, China, and many countries around the world with the Toronto, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago, Houston, Pittsburgh, Boston, San Francisco and Dallas Symphony Orchestras, as well as with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the New York, Bogota and Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestras, the Boston Pops Orchestra, the Hong Kong Sinfonietta and the London Symphony Orchestra, the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, the Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra, I Musici, the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, Philharmonia Hungarica, the Hungarian State Orchestra, the Spanish National Orchestra, the Spanish National Radio/Television Orchestra, L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, The New Moscow Chamber Orchestra, the Springfiled Orchestra, the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, the American Sinfonietta and the Bournemouth Symphony. He has been a special guest at the festivals of Salzburg, Israel, Schleswig-Holstein, Menuhin, Osaka, Granada, Istanbul, Ravinia, Garden State, Hollywood Bowl, Blossom, Wolf Trap, Saratoga and Hong Kong.

Since his first recording (at the age of 15) he has recorded over 50 solo albums and 30 albums as part of the famed guitar quartet The Romeros. He has played for Presidents Carter and Nixon, the Queen of the Netherlands, the Prince of Wales and Pope John Paul II. He has numerous international recording awards to his credit and has received an Honorary Doctorate in Music from University of Victoria.

His contributions to the field of classical guitar have inspired a number of distinguished composers to write works specifically for him, including Joaquín Rodrigo, Federico Moreno Torroba, Rev. Francisco de Madina, Lorenzo Palomo, Michael Zearott, Enrique Diemecke, and Celedonio Romero.

Pepe Romero is the second son of Celedonio Romero, who was his only guitar teacher. His first professional appearance was in a shared concert with his father when Pepe was only seven years old. In 1957 Celedonio Romero left Franco‘s Spain for the United States with his family.

On February 11, 2000, King Juan Carlos I of Spain knighted Pepe Romero and his brothers, Celin and Ángel, into the Order of “Isabel la Catolica.” The official ceremony of this high honor took place at the USC Thornton School of Music, and included a gala performance by The Romeros with the Thornton Chamber Orchestra. He is currently Adjunct Professor of Classical Guitar at the Thornton School, where he was named “Distinguished Artist in Residence” in 2004.[1][2]

Although originally a classical guitarist, he is talented in Flamenco and a popular Flamenco performer. His most famous Flamenco-only album is called ¡Flamenco Fenómeno!

The Romero Guitar Quartet

The Romero Guitar Quartet

Related Stories:    HERE


this day in the yesteryear: Haymarket Riot (1886)

English: Placard protesting police brutality a...

English: Placard protesting police brutality at a Shell to Sea protest, Bellanaboy, September 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Haymarket Riot (1886)

This violent confrontation between Chicago police and labor protesters, which dramatized the labor movement’s struggle for recognition, began when a bomb was thrown into the police ranks at a gathering of radical unionists protesting police brutality against strikers. With seven officers dead and 60 wounded, the police opened fire on the crowd. Seven anarchist leaders were later sentenced to death. Why is their trial regarded as one of the most serious miscarriages of justice in US history? More… Discuss

Must read: Ebola in Liberia: According to Dr. Kwan Kew Lai’s Blog

Today is the Feast of St. Kew, a little known Welsh saint, probably of the fifth century. She was the sister of a hermit called Docco who founded a monastery at or near the village of St. Kew which is now in Cornwall, England. Nothing much is known about her except that she was able to cause some wild boars to obey her, this ability caught the attention of her said brother who condescended to finally speak to her. Why they were not on speaking terms to begin with was a mystery.What is in a name? Kew is my given name. It would be unheard of to have a saint with my name especially someone from Asia. My daughter, Cara, was told by her Confraternity Christian Development (CCD) teacher that everyone has a saint who bears his or her name. She searched in vain for a saint with her name.

via Ebola in Liberia.

***featured on by NPR: The Ebola Diaries: Trying To Heal Patients You Can’t Touch http://n.pr/1EaPxUw

*Breathing Techniques* (Yoga, Meditation, Relaxation, Stress, Cancer, Blood Pressure) Kapalbhati

*Breathing Techniques* (Yoga, Meditation, Relaxation, Stress, Cancer, Blood Pressure) Kapalbhati

today’s photo: The Airship USS Macon Crashes (Image: National Archives)

The Airship USS Macon Crashes

On its 55th flight, the airship USS Macon crashed on February 12, 1935. While off Point Sur, California, a gust of wind tore off the ship’s upper fin, which deflated the gas cells and caused the ship to fall into the sea. Most of Macon’s 83 crewmen were rescued from the waters, but two of them died in the accident. The U.S. Navy had suffered the loss of the airship Shenandoah in 1925 and Akron in 1933. Some considered airships too dangerous for the program to continue at that point, and work on them in the United States halted temporarily.

Image: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day?podMonth=2&podDay=11&pod=GO#sthash.pMfctVIU.dpuf

health news: Canes and Walkers May Increase Fall Risk

Canes and Walkers May Increase Fall Risk

Many elderly people use canes and walkers to get around, but a new study reveals how dangerous these aids can be when used without proper training. Untrained users tend to drag the cane or walker, thus creating a dangerous gait pattern that increases the risk of falling. The study focused on 43 older adults in an assisted living facility and found that those using walking aids were nearly four times more likely to fall than those without aids. Experts recommend training individuals to use such devices as well as instructing them in balance recovery and gait exercises. More… Discuss

The Hollywood Walk of Fame

The Hollywood Walk of Fame

The Hollywood Walk of Fame is a sidewalk along Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street in Hollywood, California, that features more than 2,000 pink stars featuring the names of celebrities honored by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce for their contributions to the entertainment industry. Each star contains a bronze emblem representing one of five categories for which an honoree can receive a star—such as a camera denoting achievement in film. Who received the walk’s first star? More… Discuss

Hollywood walk of fame/ Los Angeles 1/2/2010

quotation: ― Augustine of Hippo


“Because God has made us for Himself, our hearts are restless until they rest in Him.”
Augustine of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo by Sandro Botticelli, c. 1490.

Augustine of Hippo by Sandro Botticelli, c. 1490. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)



this day inn the yesteryear: Boy Scouts of America Founded (1910)

Boy Scouts of America Founded (1910)

One of the largest youth organizations in the US is the Boy Scouts of America, which promotes community service and character building. The scouts’ activities aim at mental, moral, and physical development, stressing outdoor skills and training in citizenship and lifesaving. Scouts receive recognition in the form of merit badges and awards. The basic scout unit is a troop of about 15 boys, under the leadership of an adult scoutmaster. How many of the 12 men to walk on the moon were Boy Scouts? More… Discuss

Published on Aug 16, 2013 Music “Apocalypse des animaux” by Dj In the Night, ‘…cum ar fi o zi in care Soarele ar intarzia mai sa apara…’ (un comentariu foarte, sperca sa va placa)

Published on Aug 16, 2013


Rare Sierra Nevada Red Fox Spotted at Yosemite National Park – ABC News

Rare Sierra Nevada Red Fox Spotted at Yosemite National Park – ABC News.

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

January 29

1813   Jane Austin publishes Pride and Prejudice.
1861   Kansas is admitted into the Union as the 34th state.
1865   William Quantrill and his Confederate raiders attack Danville, Kentucky.
1918   The Supreme Allied Council meets at Versailles.
1926   Violette Neatley Anderson becomes the first African-American woman admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court.
1929   The Seeing Eye, America’s first school for training dogs to guide the blind, founded in Nashville, Tennessee.
1931   Winston Churchill resigns as Stanley Baldwin’s aide.
1942   German and Italian troops take Benghazi in North Africa.
1944   The world’s greatest warship, Missouri, is launched.
1950   Riots break out in Johannesburg, South Africa, over the policy of Apartheid.
1967   Thirty-seven civilians are killed by a U.S. helicopter attack in Vietnam.
1979   President Jimmy Carter commutes the sentence of Patty Hearst.
1984   President Ronald Reagan announces that he will run for a second term.
1984   The Soviets issue a formal complaint against alleged U.S. arms treaty violations.
1991   Iraqi forces attack into Saudi Arabian town of Kafji, but are turned back by Coalition forces.
Born on January 29
1737   Thomas Paine, political essayist (The Rights of Man, The Age of Reason).
1843   William McKinley, 25th President of the United States.
1880   W.C. Fields, comedian and actor (David Copperfield, My Little Chickadee).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.ET1pFIYd.dpuf

California missions – Los Angeles Times

California’s famed 21 missions were all built to be exactly a day’s journey apart.  

via California missions – Los Angeles Times.


***Additional images (not from The LA Times), from internet research (Yahoo)

click to enlarge


California Mission Monterey (click to enlarge)



Ragtime: Scott Joplin – The Entertainer


Ragtime is a style of American piano music emphasizing syncopation and polyrhythm. Popular in the early 20th century, it was the first form of jazz to exert a wide appeal—thanks, in part, to Scott Joplin and Irving Berlin, its most celebrated composers and performers. In a ragtime composition, the pianist’s left hand keeps an accented beat while the right hand plays a fast, bouncing melody that gives the music its powerful forward impetus. What is the likely origin of the name “ragtime”? More… Discuss

Ragtime Piano : SCOTT JOPLIN . ” The Entertainer ” (1902)

today’s picture: Gold Discovered at Sutter’s Mill

Gold Discovered at Sutter’s Mill
At John A. Sutter’s sawmill near where the American and Sacramento rivers converge in California, carpenter James W. Marshall found gold on January 24, 1848. Marshall, Sutter and their workers tried to keep the discovery quiet but gold-seekers quickly began pouring into California, raising the state’s non-Indian population to about 20,000 in 1848, 100,000 in 1849 and twice that amount by 1852. Gold mining was a multi-million-dollar industry, but so many people had come to claim their fortunes–from other states and other countries–that few of them actually became rich. Miners, like those shown above, often found that searching for gold was more difficult work than they had expected.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.JWUm45tx.dpuf

this pressed for your information: California community college deserves hearing on accreditation: judge|Info24.us

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – A college regulator violated the law by failing to give California’s largest community college a fair hearing before deciding to terminate its accreditation, according to a tentative court ruling on Friday.

The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges had planned to withdraw accreditation from City College of San Francisco, citing a lack of financial accountability and other longstanding problems, none directly related to educational quality.

Lost accreditation would trigger funding cuts that would shutter the school, San Francisco’s only community college, with more than 50 academic programs and over 100 occupational disciplines, from nursing to culinary arts and aircraft mechanics.

The city of San Francisco sued, and a judge put the accreditation decision on hold pending a trial that took place last year.

via California community college deserves hearing on accreditation: judge.


Piece of Americana: Second McDonald’s Fast Food Stand: opened 1953 (my photo collection)

This gallery contains 3 photos.

  From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia History   McDonald’s corporate logo used from November 18, 1968 to 2006. It still exists at some restaurants.   The oldest operating McDonald’s restaurant was the third one built, opening in 1953. It is … Continue reading

(California): This is the one simple truth car insurance company don’t want you to know. (New Rule Leaves Drivers Furious and Shocked!)

New Rule Leaves Drivers Furious and

And I promised myself not to allow myself to be shocked this year!

Warning: Do Not Pay Your Next Car Insurance
Bill Until You Read This…

January 14, 2015

(California): This is the one simple truth car insurance company don’t want you to know. If you are currently insured, drive less than 35 miles/day and live in a qualified zip code you can receive some huge discounts. Also, if you have no DUI’s on your record, you may qualify for some of the biggest discounts of all. But do you think your car insurance company will tell you that?

When drivers enter their zip code and vehicle information at Provide-Insurance.com many are shocked at the results they find. Most just can’t believe that the available rates are in fact real, but the truth is rates have dropped significantly for many people over the past 12 months. Also, thanks to new program policies it’s now easy to save up to 45% with rates as low as $9/week.

We had Kristen Pereira, our in house financial expert, test these types of services out. She came back a few days later to report a number of exciting things – including that she will now save over $400 during the next year. She found many others who have done the same.

Does this mean Kristen was overcharged by her previous insurance company? Well, it’s possible since they neglected to share with her a number of lower cost insurance options. When confronted, she was told in a hesitant voice,”There are just so many options, and I didn’t think you would be interested in that specific one.”   continue reading here

this day in the yesteryear: Marilyn Monroe Marries Joe DiMaggio (1954)

English: Crypt of Marilyn Monroe at Westwood V...

English: Crypt of Marilyn Monroe at Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Marilyn Monroe Marries Joe DiMaggio (1954)

Marilyn Monroe married baseball star Joe DiMaggio after a courtship that captivated America. Their marriage lasted just nine months, collapsing amid reports of DiMaggio’s growing possessiveness. Monroe then wed playwright Arthur Miller, but after divorcing him in 1961, she became close again with DiMaggio. When Monroe was found dead in August 1962, it was DiMaggio who made the funeral arrangements. For the next 20 years, what did DiMaggio have delivered regularly to Monroe’s crypt? More… Discuss

Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 1 in E flat major, great compositions/performances

Sviatoslav Richter – Liszt – Piano Concerto No 1 in E flat major

2015 Golden Globes – Tina Fey and Amy Poehler (Full Monologue HD) Cosby

2015 Golden Globes – Tina Fey and Amy Poehler (Full Monologue HD) Cosby

Beethoven, Piano Concerto No. 2 Op. 19 in B flat major. Evgeny Kissin , make music pat of your life series

Beethoven, Piano Concerto No. 2 Op. 19 in B flat major. Evgeny Kissin

News – Tech at work: Status Update Saves Stranded Hiker

Status Update Saves Stranded Hiker

A resourceful emergency dispatcher used social media to help save a hiker who plunged 150 feet (45 m) off a cliff into a tree near Sacramento, California, this week. After a 911 call by the hiker’s son was disconnected, dispatchers tried in vain to determine the location using the cell phone’s coordinates—until a dispatch trainee Googled the injured man’s name. She soon found his Facebook page, saw an earlier status update about his hike, and sent rescue crews to his location. The man was treated for broken bones and a head injury. More… Discuss

this pressed for your health: Latest measles outbreak highlights a growing problem in California – LA Times

California’s problems of measles and whooping cough

There were more than 9,900 cases of whooping cough in California in 2014 through Nov. 26. Above, Tyree Harper, 12, receives the whooping cough vaccine during a school readiness event at Jesse Owens Park in Los Angeles in August. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)
By Rong-Gong Lin II contact the reporter

There were more than 9,900 cases of whooping cough in California in 2014 through Nov. 26. Above, Tyree Harper, 12, receives the whooping cough vaccine during a school readiness event at Jesse Owens Park in Los Angeles in August. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)

via Latest measles outbreak highlights a growing problem in California – LA Times.

Bringing great music Closer to Your Ear, great compositions/performances, Gioachino Rossini – Sonata No. 1 for Strings in G major


Please the Wolfgang Amadé Mozart channel on You Tube, for more wonderful videos he is making available for all of us, subscribe and “Like” the videos! (between me and your:; one should be able to do that, without having to subscribe first (and that’s how you see where the powerthrist always tend to do to get more power! and Google seems to have monopolized the world in that sense!)

Gioachino Rossini – Sonata No. 1 for Strings in G major

today’s Birthday: King C. Gillette (1855)

King C. Gillette (1855)

Advised to create a product for which there would be constant demand, traveling salesman and inveterate “tinkerer” King C. Gillette secured his place in history with the invention of a safety razor with a disposable blade. The razor was nothing new, but the blade was a groundbreaking innovation. In his first year of production, Gillette sold 51 razors and 168 blades. By the next year, sales had skyrocketed to 90,000 razors and over 12 million blades. How did World War I grow Gillette’s business? More… Discuss

History – The World of Journalism – William Randolph Hearst

The World of Journalism - William Randolph Hearst

The World of Journalism – William Randolph Hearst (several software were employed to create this collage: Brothers scanner, FastStone image editor, Irfan View Collage function)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation).
William Randolph Hearst
William Randolph Hearst cph 3a49373.jpg
Hearst in 1906, photograph by James E. Purdy
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York‘s 11th district
In office
March 4, 1903 – March 4, 1907
Preceded by William Sulzer
Succeeded by Charles V. Fornes
Personal details
Born April 29, 1863
San Francisco, California, U.S.
Died August 14, 1951 (aged 88)
Beverly Hills, California, U.S.
Political party Democratic Party (1896–1935)
Independence Party (1905–1910)
Municipal Ownership League (1904–05)
Spouse(s) Millicent Willson Hearst (1903–1951)
Relations Phoebe Apperson Hearst, mother
George Hearst, father
Patty Hearst, granddaughter
Anne Hearst, granddaughter
Lydia Hearst-Shaw, great-granddaughter
Amanda Hearst, great-granddaughter
Marion Davies, mistress
Children George Randolph Hearst (1904–1972)
William Randolph Hearst, Jr. (1908–1993)
John Randolph Hearst (1910–1958)
Randolph Apperson Hearst (1915–2000)
David Whitmire Hearst (1915–1986)
Residence Hearst Castle
San Simeon, California
Alma mater Harvard University
Occupation Businessman & publisher

William Randolph Hearst (/ˈhɜrst/;[1] April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper publisher who built the nation’s largest newspaper chain and whose methods profoundly influenced American journalism.[2] Hearst entered the publishing business in 1887 after taking control of The San Francisco Examiner from his father. Moving to New York City, he acquired The New York Journal and engaged in a bitter circulation war with Joseph Pulitzer‘s New York World that led to the creation of yellow journalism—sensationalized stories of dubious veracity. Acquiring more newspapers, Hearst created a chain that numbered nearly 30 papers in major American cities at its peak. He later expanded to magazines, creating the largest newspaper and magazine business in the world.

He was twice elected as a Democrat to the U.S. House of Representatives, and ran unsuccessfully for Mayor of New York City in 1905 and 1909, for Governor of New York in 1906, and for Lieutenant Governor of New York in 1910. Nonetheless, through his newspapers and magazines, he exercised enormous political influence, and was famously blamed for pushing public opinion with his yellow journalism type of reporting leading the United States into a war with Spain in 1898.

His life story was the main inspiration for the development of the lead character in Orson Welles‘s film Citizen Kane.[3] His mansion, Hearst Castle, on a hill overlooking the Pacific Ocean near San Simeon, California, halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, was donated by the Hearst Corporation to the state of California in 1957, and is now a State Historical Monument and a National Historic Landmark, open for public tours. Hearst formally named the estate La Cuesta Encantada (“The Enchanted Slope”), but he usually just called it “the ranch.”

Ancestry and early life

William R. Hearst was born in San Francisco to millionaire mining engineer, goldmine owner and U.S. senator (1886–91) George Hearst and his wife Phoebe Apperson Hearst.

His paternal great-grandfather was John Hearst, of Scots-Irish origin, who emigrated to America with his wife and six children in 1766 and settled in South Carolina. Their immigration to South Carolina was spurred in part by the colonial government’s policy that encouraged the immigration of Irish Protestants.[4] The names “John Hearse” and “John Hearse Jr.” appear on the council records of October 26, 1766, being credited with meriting 400 and 100 acres (1.62 and 0.40 km2) of land on the Long Canes (in what became Abbeville District), based upon 100 acres (0.40 km2) to heads of household and 50 acres (200,000 m2) for each dependent of a Protestant immigrant. The “Hearse” spelling of the family name never was used afterward by the family members themselves, or any family of any size. A separate theory purports that one branch of a “Hurst” family of Virginia (originally from Plymouth Colony) moved to South Carolina at about the same time and changed the spelling of its surname of over a century to that of the emigrant Hearsts.[5] Hearst’s mother, née Phoebe Elizabeth Apperson, was of Irish ancestry; her family came from Galway.[6] She was the first woman regent of University of California, Berkeley, funded many anthropological expeditions and founded the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology.

Following preparation at St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire, Hearst enrolled in the Harvard College class of 1885. While there he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon, the A.D. Club (a Harvard Final club), the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, and of the Harvard Lampoon before being expelled for antics ranging from sponsoring massive beer parties in Harvard Square to sending pudding pots used as chamber pots to his professors (their images were depicted within the bowls).[7]

Publishing business

 An ad asking automakers to place ads in Hearst chain, noting their circulation.

Searching for an occupation, in 1887 Hearst took over management of a newspaper, the San Francisco Examiner, which his father received in 1880 as repayment for a gambling debt.[8] Giving his paper a grand motto, “Monarch of the Dailies,” he acquired the best equipment and the most talented writers of the time, including Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, Jack London, and political cartoonist Homer Davenport. A self-proclaimed populist, Hearst went on to publish stories of municipal and financial corruption, often attacking companies in which his own family held an interest. Within a few years, his paper dominated the San Francisco market.

New York Morning Journal

Early in his career at the San Francisco Examiner, Hearst envisioned running a large newspaper chain, and “always knew that his dream of a nation-spanning, multi-paper news operation was impossible without a triumph in New York.”[9] In 1895, with the financial support of his mother, he bought the failing New York Morning Journal, hiring writers like Stephen Crane and Julian Hawthorne and entering into a head-to-head circulation war with Joseph Pulitzer, owner and publisher of the New York World, from whom he “stole” Richard F. Outcault, the inventor of color comics, and all of Pulitzer’s Sunday staff as well.[10] Another prominent hire was James J. Montague, who came from the Portland Oregonian and started his well-known “More Truth Than Poetry” column at the Hearst-owned New York Evening Journal.[11]

When Hearst purchased the “penny paper,” so called because its copies sold for only a penny apiece, the Journal was competing with New York’s 16 other major dailies, with a strong focus on Democratic Party politics.[12] Hearst imported his best managers from the San Francisco Examiner and “quickly established himself as the most attractive employer” among New York newspapers. He was generous, paid more than his competitors, gave credit to his writers with page-one bylines, and was unfailingly polite, unassuming, “impeccably calm,” and indulgent of “prima donnas, eccentrics, bohemians, drunks, or reprobates so long as they had useful talents.”[13]

Hearst’s activist approach to journalism can be summarized by the motto, “While others Talk, the Journal Acts.”


In part to aid in his political ambitions, Hearst opened newspapers in some other cities, among them Chicago, Los Angeles and Boston. The creation of his Chicago paper was requested by the Democratic National Committee, and Hearst used this as an excuse for Phoebe Hearst to transfer him the necessary start-up funds. By the mid-1920s he had a nation-wide string of 28 newspapers, among them the Los Angeles Examiner, the Boston American, the Atlanta Georgian, the Chicago Examiner, the Detroit Times, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, the Washington Times, the Washington Herald, and his flagship the San Francisco Examiner.

Hearst also diversified his publishing interests into book publishing and magazines; several of the latter are still in circulation, including such periodicals as Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Town and Country, and Harper’s Bazaar.

 Cartoonist Rogers in 1906 sees the political uses of Oz: he depicts William Randolph Hearst as the Scarecrow stuck in his own Ooze in Harper’s Weekly.

In 1924 he opened the New York Daily Mirror, a racy tabloid frankly imitating the New York Daily News, Among his other holdings were two news services, Universal News and International News Service, or INS, the latter of which he founded in 1909.[36] He also owned INS companion radio station WINS in New York); King Features Syndicate, which still owns the copyrights of a number of popular comics characters; a film company, Cosmopolitan Productions; extensive New York City real estate; and thousands of acres of land in California and Mexico, along with timber and mining interests.

Hearst’s father, US Senator George Hearst, had acquired land in the Mexican state of Chihuahua after receiving advance notice that Geronimo – who had terrorized settlers in the region – had surrendered. George Hearst was able to buy 670,000 acres (270,000 ha),[37] the Babicora Ranch, at 20–40 cents each because only he knew that they had become much more secure.[38] George Hearst was on friendly terms with Porfirio Díaz, the Mexican dictator, who helped him settle boundary disputes profitably. The ranch was expanded to nearly 1,000,000 acres (400,000 ha) by George Hearst, then by Phoebe Hearst after his death.[38][39] The younger Hearst was at Babicora as early as 1886, when, as he wrote to his mother, “I really don’t see what is to prevent us from owning all Mexico and running it to suit ourselves.”[37][40] During the Mexican Revolution, his mother’s ranch was looted by irregulars under Pancho Villa. Babicora was then occupied by Carranza’s forces. Phoebe Hearst willed the ranch to her son in 1919.[41] Babicora was sold to the Mexican government for $2.5 million in 1953, just two years after Hearst’s death.[42]

Hearst promoted writers and cartoonists despite the lack of any apparent demand for them by his readers. The press critic A. J. Liebling reminds us how many of Hearst’s stars would not have been deemed employable elsewhere. One Hearst favorite, George Herriman, was the inventor of the dizzy comic strip Krazy Kat; not especially popular with either readers or editors at the time of its initial publication, it is now considered by many to be a classic, a belief once held only by Hearst himself.

Two months before the Wall Street Crash of 1929, he became one of the sponsors of the first round-the-world voyage in an airship, the LZ 127 Graf Zeppelin from Germany. His sponsorship was conditional on the trip starting at Lakehurst Naval Air Station, NJ, so the ship’s captain, Dr. Hugo Eckener, first flew the Graf Zeppelin across the Atlantic from Germany to pick up Hearst’s photographer and at least three Hearst correspondents. One of them, Grace Marguerite Hay Drummond-Hay, by that flight became the first woman to travel around the world by air.[43]

The Hearst news empire reached a circulation and revenue peak about 1928, but the economic collapse of the Great Depression and the vast over-extension of his empire cost him control of his holdings. It is unlikely that the newspapers ever paid their own way; mining, ranching and forestry provided whatever dividends the Hearst Corporation paid out. When the collapse came, all Hearst properties were hit hard, but none more so than the papers; Furthermore, his now-conservative politics, increasingly at odds with those of his readers, only worsened matters for the once great Hearst media chain. Having been refused the right to sell another round of bonds to unsuspecting investors, the shaky empire tottered. Unable to service its existing debts, Hearst Corporation faced a court-mandated reorganization in 1937. From that point, Hearst was reduced to being merely another employee, subject to the directives of an outside manager.[25] Newspapers and other properties were liquidated, the film company shut down; there was even a well-publicized sale of art and antiquities. While World War II restored circulation and advertising revenues, his great days were over. Hearst died of a heart attack in 1951, aged eighty-eight, in Beverly Hills, California, and is buried at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park in Colma, California.

The Hearst Corporation continues to this day as a large, privately held media conglomerate based in New York City.


Rattlesnake Hilltop (Turnbull Canyon) Puente Hills, California August 3, 2013

Rattlesnake Hilltop (Turnbull Canyon) Puente Hills, California August 3, 2013

Quotation: “I saw a creature, naked, bestial, Who, squatting upon the ground, Held his heart in his hands, And ate of it.” – Stephen Crane (1871-1900)

Quotation of the Day

I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
Who, squatting upon the ground,
Held his heart in his hands,
And ate of it.”Stephen Crane (1871-1900) Discuss

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Formal portrait of Stephen Crane taken in Washington, D.C., about March 1896

Stephen Crane (November 1, 1871 – June 5, 1900) was an American author. Prolific throughout his short life, he wrote notable works in the Realist tradition as well as early examples of American Naturalism and Impressionism. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation.

The eighth surviving child of Protestant Methodist parents, Crane began writing at the age of four and had published several articles by the age of 16. Having little interest in university studies, he left college in 1891 to work as a reporter and writer. Crane’s first novel was the 1893 Bowery tale Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, generally considered by critics to be the first work of American literary Naturalism. He won international acclaim in 1895 for his Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage, which he wrote without having any battle experience.

In 1896, Crane endured a highly publicized scandal after appearing as a witness in the trial of a suspected prostitute, an acquaintance named Dora Clark. Late that year he accepted an offer to travel to Cuba as a war correspondent. As he waited in Jacksonville, Florida, for passage, he met Cora Taylor, the madam of a brothel, with whom he began a lasting relationship. En route to Cuba, Crane’s ship sank off the coast of Florida, leaving him and others adrift for several days in a dinghy. Crane described the ordeal in “The Open Boat“. During the final years of his life, he covered conflicts in Greece (accompanied by Cora, recognized as the first woman war correspondent) and later lived in England with her. He was befriended by writers such as Joseph Conrad and H. G. Wells. Plagued by financial difficulties and ill health, Crane died of tuberculosis in a Black Forest sanatorium in Germany at the age of 28.

At the time of his death, Crane was considered an important figure in American literature. After he was nearly forgotten for two decades, critics revived interest in his life and work. Crane’s writing is characterized by vivid intensity, distinctive dialects, and irony. Common themes involve fear, spiritual crises and social isolation. Although recognized primarily for The Red Badge of Courage, which has become an American classic, Crane is also known for his poetry, journalism, and short stories such as “The Open Boat”, “The Blue Hotel“, “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky“, and The Monster. His writing made a deep impression on 20th-century writers, most prominent among them Ernest Hemingway, and is thought to have inspired the Modernists and the Imagists.

Crane’s gravestone in Evergreen Cemetery


Battle of Chancellorsville by Kurz and Allison; Crane’s realistic portrayal of war has earned him recognition from numerous critics and scholars throughout the years


the ALAMO: Word of the standoff ricocheted across America, prompting a deluge of supportive messages for the fatigued but tenacious holdout.

The Alamo, built in the 18th century from locally quarried limestone, rests deep in the heart of Texas. (Photo: Library of Congress)

The Alamo, built in the 18th century from locally quarried limestone, rests deep in the heart of Texas. (Photo: Library of Congress) – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/here-is-where-holding-the-fort-in-san-antonio.htm#sthash.BtnOn3Zo.dpuf

Barricaded in a freezing cold, rat-infested room inside the Alamo, the lone defender had gone almost three days without food, water or sleep after armed men had positioned themselves around the compound. Word of the standoff ricocheted across America, prompting a deluge of supportive messages for the fatigued but tenacious holdout.

“Win or lose, we congratulate you upon your splendid patriotism and courage,” read one telegram from New York signed by John B. Adams, a descendant of President John Adams. Editors from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch wired San Antonio: “Commandant of the Alamo:—Will you send…a message to the women of St. Louis, who are watching with great interest your own gallant defense of the Alamo?”

The “commandant” was no military officer but a 46-year-old Texas schoolteacher named Adina De Zavala, who had commenced her one-woman siege on February 10, 1908. De Zavala replied to the Post-Dispatch: “My immortal forefathers suffered every privation to defend the freedom of Texas. I, like them, am willing to die for what I believe to be right. . . . The officers cannot starve me into submission.”

De Zavala’s impassioned statement echoed the urgent message Lt. Col. William Barret Travis had dashed off 72 years earlier, on February 24, 1836, when his 200 Texan and Tejano rebels were fortified inside the old mission, surrounded by several thousand Mexican troops under President General Antonio López de Santa Anna.

“To the People of Texas and All Americans in the World,” Travis wrote, “I am besieged, by a thousand or more of the Mexicans under Santa Anna—I have sustained a continual Bombardment & cannonade for 24 hours & have not lost a man—The enemy has demanded a surrender at discretion, otherwise, the garrison are to be put to the sword, if the fort is taken—I have answered the demand with a cannon shot, & our flag still waves proudly from the walls—I shall never surrender or retreat. Then, I call on you in the name of Liberty, of patriotism, & every thing dear to the American character, to come to our aid, with all dispatch. . . . If this call is neglected, I am determined to sustain myself as long as possible & die like a soldier who never forgets what is due to his own honor & that of his country—Victory or Death.”

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/here-is-where-holding-the-fort-in-san-antonio.htm#sthash.BtnOn3Zo.dpuf

Rancho California 1972 – Real Estate-“Illusions are real”

Rancho California 1972 - Real Estate-Illusions are real

Rancho California 1972 – Real Estate-Illusions are real

National Geographic 2014 Hybrid Giant Pythons found in Florida – Best Travel Check out Monster Quest!

National Geographic 2014 Hybrid Giant Pythons found in Florida – Best Travel

this is just a test (A test I say!)


Embeds « WordPress Codex: because I can’t embed VEVO videos on my WordPress.com website (#euzicasa)

wordpress logo

Embeds « WordPress Codex. (these are just for .org…)

then: Job hunting in 1930s — Historical Pics …and NOW ( a hungry story!)

Published on Jul 8, 2012

Inspired from a book with the same title written by Dr Spencer Johnson. Its about 2 mice and two little people whose live in a maze. This story is actually reflecting ourselves and our behaviour when it comes to change. Like everything else CHANGE is inevitable. Many people resist change and live their lives in fear of change. Some will change according to time while mmost won’t. Some will take it as an opportunity while others will look at it as a threat. Which one is you?

The sinister reality -Then and Now – People still are hunting for a job!

today’s holiday: Newport Harbor Christmas Boat Parade (2014)

Newport Harbor Christmas Boat Parade (2014)

The Newport Harbor Christmas Boat Parade is a nightly parade of boats at Newport Beach, California. More than 150 boats of all kinds, wildly decorated with lights depicting Santa Claus, snowmen, and other symbols of winter, join the parade. Some boats carry huge inflated figures, and many play music. The floating parades started in 1908 as a Fourth of July spectacular. In 1946, the city put a tree and carolers on a barge and towed it around the harbor, and that began the current December parades. Today, about a million spectators watch them during the festival. More… Discuss

this pressed for your right to know: A California town helped America get to the moon. Now it’s waiting for its next great economic rocket — Washington Post

today’s birthday: Frank Sinatra (1915) Check Yahoo’s first 5 most popular Sinatra # euzicasa songs!

Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection

Frank Sinatra Christmas Collection (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Frank Sinatra (1915)

Sinatra was a giant of American entertainment. He began his career in the 1930s as a singer whose romantic renditions of songs like “I’ll Never Smile Again” caused teenage girls, called “bobby soxers,” to shriek and swoon. Later, as an actor, he starred in films such as The Manchurian Candidate, From Here to Eternity,

Nothing But the Best (album)

Nothing But the Best (album) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

and the original Ocean’s Eleven. He became popular in Las Vegas as the leader of the Rat Pack, a group that included what other 1950s entertainers? More… Discuss

this pressed for your right to know: Californian students vent fury at soaring cost of public universities | The FRANCE 24 Observers

20/11/2014 / UNITED STATES

Californian students vent fury at soaring cost of public universities

United States/students

Photo published on Twitter by @Tiffanydloftin.

Hundreds of students from all over California, unhappy with plans to raise tuition for the state’s public university system, held a raucous protest in San Francisco on Wednesday. They clashed with police and tried to stop a regent – a member of the board that governs the university system – from entering the building where the measure was being debated.

The video below shows students blocking the regent’s way. The regent starts to panic, and several police officers arrive to form a circle around him. They attempt to get him past the students, before giving up and ushering him away from the scene.

via Californian students vent fury at soaring cost of public universities | The FRANCE 24 Observers.

today’s holiday: Day of the Beaches

Day of the Beaches

In Uruguay, December 8 is known as the Day of the Beaches because it marks the official opening of the beach season on the coast known as the “Uruguayan Riviera.” There are ceremonies in which a priest blesses the waters, sailing regattas, horseback riding competitions, and an international shooting contest at Carrasco. Sometimes this day is referred to as Family Day or Blessing of the Waters Day. More… Discuss

Double Dipping (dig-mouth-dig 2X)”| National Geographic (An experiment forces people to think about what they’re doing when they dip a chip)

Double Dipping


Crowd Control: Rule Your World: Travel Tricks