Tag Archives: camille saint saëns

Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré


Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré

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Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré


Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré

Marche militaire française from Suite algérienne, Op. 60


Marche militaire française from Suite algérienne, Op. 60

Nathan Milstein – Saint-Saëns – Violin Concerto No 3 in B minor, Op 61 , great compositions/performances


Nathan Milstein – Saint-Saëns – Violin Concerto No 3 in B minor, Op 61

Felix Mendelssohn – Octet in E-flat major, Op. 20, (1964) : great compositions/performances


Alicia de Larrocha plays ENRIQUE GRANADOS – Danzas Españolas: make music par of your life series


ENRIQUE GRANADOS.- Danzas Españolas

Bach / I Musici, 1965: Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B flat major, BWV 1051: make music part of your life series


Bach / I Musici, 1965: Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B flat major, BWV 1051- Complete

Saint-Saëns Cello Concerto 1 & 2, Suite for Cello & Orchestra Op.16, and other works – S. Isserlis: make music part of your life series


Saint-Saëns Cello Concerto 1 & 2, Suite for Cello & Orchestra Op.16, and other works – S. Isserlis

SAINT-SAËNS Violin Sonata No.1 – A.Pascal, I.Philipp, 1934 *vinyl remaster*: make music part of your life series


SAINT-SAËNS Violin Sonata No.1 – A.Pascal, I.Philipp, 1934 *vinyl remaster*

Camille Saint-Saëns – Africa, Op. 89, in G minor – Fantasy for Piano and Orchestra: great composirtions/performances


Saint-Saëns Camille
[Charles Camille]
1835-1921

Camille Saint-Saëns – Africa, Op. 89, in G minor – Fantasy for Piano and Orchestra

Camille Saint-Saëns: Carnival of Animals – The Dying Swan (Le Cygne) – Dancer, Svetlana Zakharova: great compositions/performances


Camille Saint-Saëns: Carnival of Animals – The Dying Swan (Le Cygne) – Dancer, Svetlana Zakharova

Felix Mendelssohn: Symphony No.3 – Blomstedt/RCO(2008Live): Great compositions/performances


Mendelssohn: Symphony No.3 – Blomstedt/RCO(2008Live)

Camille Saint-Saëns – Danse Macabre (National Philharmonic Orchestra, conductor:Leopold Stokowski): great compositions/performances


Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20: great compositions/performances


Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20

Itzhak Perlman

Cover of Itzhak Perlman

Wieniawski – Polonaise brilliante (LEONID KOGAN): Great compositions/performances


Wieniawski – Polonaise brilliante (LEONID KOGAN)

Jacqueline du Pre – Lalo cello concerto – part 1 (playlist of 4 videos): great compositions/performances


Jacqueline du Pre – Lalo cello concerto – part 1 (playlist of 4 videos)

Peter Cornelius(1824-1874) Barbier von Bagdad-Overture: Great performances


Peter Cornelius(1824-1874) Barbier von Bagdad-Overture

English: German conductor Hans Knappertsbusch ...

English: German conductor Hans Knappertsbusch (1888-1965) Deutsch: Hans Knappertsbusch (1888-1965), deutscher Dirigent (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Conductor: Hans Knappertsbusch
Orchestra: Bavarian State Orchestra
1953,live

Saint-Saëns – Violin Sonata No. 1 – Heifetz, Smith: Great compositions/performances


from:  ryan teall:

Saint-Saëns – Violin Sonata No. 1 – Heifetz, Smith

Camille Saint-Saëns, Violin Sonata No. 1, Op. 75 (1885)

I. Allegro agitato
II. Adagio (6:45)
III. Allegro moderato (12:33)
IV. Allegro molto (16:13)

Jascha Heifetz, Brooks Smith

HISTORIC PERFORMANCES: Saint-Saens Cello Concerto No.1 Op.33 In A Minor – Jacqueline Du pré


[youtube.com/watch?v=DZCPV9Q9Fz4]

 

Camille Saint-Saëns composed his Cello Concerto No. 1 in A minor, Op. 33 in 1872, when the composer was 37 years old. He wrote this work for the Belgian cellist, viola de gamba player and instrument maker Auguste Tolbecque. Tolbecque was part of a distinguished family of musicians closely associated with the Société des Concerts du Conservatoire, France’s leading concert society. The concerto was first performed on January 19, 1873 at a conservatoire concert with Tolbecque as soloist. This was considered a mark of Saint-Saëns’ growing acceptance by the French musical establishment.

Sir Donald Francis Tovey later wrote “Here, for once, is a violoncello concerto in which the solo instrument displays every register without the slightest difficulty in penetrating the orchestra.” Many composers, including Shostakovich and Rachmaninoff, considered this concerto to be the greatest of all cello concertos.

The work can be split into three different sections as follows:

  1. Allegro non troppo
    The concerto begins unusually. Instead of the traditional orchestral introduction, the piece begins with one short chord from the orchestra. The cello follows, stating the main motif. Soon, countermelodies flow from both the orchestra and soloist, at times the two playfully “calling and answering” each other.
  2. Allegretto con moto
    This turbulent opening movement leads into a brief but highly original minuet, in which the strings are muted, and which contains a cello cadenza.
  3. Tempo primo
    A restatement of the opening material from the first movement opens the finale. While Saint-Saëns uses the finale mainly as a recapitulation of earlier material, he concludes it with the introduction of an entirely new idea for the cello.

Saint-Saëns very often uses the solo cello here as a declamatory instrument. This keeps the soloist in the dramatic and musical foreground, the orchestra offering a shimmering backdrop. The music is tremendously demanding for soloists, especially in the fast third section. This difficulty has not stopped the concerto from becoming a favourite of the great virtuoso cellists.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Camille Saint-Saëns – Danse Macabre



Danse Macabre (first performed in 1875) is the name of opus 40 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns.

The composition is based upon a poem by Henri Cazalis, on an old French superstition: Zig, zig, zig, Death in a cadence, Striking with his heel a tomb, Death at midnight plays a dance-tune, Zig, zig, zig, on his violin. The winter wind blows and the night is dark; Moans are heard in the linden trees. Through the gloom, white skeletons pass, Running and leaping in their shrouds. Zig, zig, zig, each one is frisking, The bones of the dancers are heard to crack— But hist! of a sudden they quit the round, They push forward, they fly; the cock has crowed.

According to the ancient superstition, “Death” appears at midnight every year on Halloween. Death has the power to call forth the dead from their graves to dance for him while he plays his fiddle (represented by a solo violin with its E-string tuned to an E-flat in an example of scordatura tuning). His skeletons dance for him until the first break of dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year.

The piece opens with a harp playing a single note, D, twelve times to signify the clock striking midnight, accompanied by soft chords from the string section. This then leads to the eerie E flat and A chords (also known as a tritone or the “Devil’s chord“) played by a solo violin, representing death on his fiddle. After which the main theme is heard on a solo flute and is followed by a descending scale on the solo violin. The rest of the orchestra, particularly the lower instruments of the string section, then joins in on the descending scale. The main theme and the scale is then heard throughout the various sections of the orchestra until it breaks to the solo violin and the harp playing the scale. The piece becomes more energetic and climaxes at this point; the full orchestra playing with strong dynamics.Towards the end of the piece, there is another violin solo, now modulating, which is then joined by the rest of the orchestra. The final section, a pianissimo, represents the dawn breaking and the skeletons returning to their graves.

The piece makes particular use of the xylophone in a particular theme to imitate the sounds of rattling bones. Saint-Saëns uses a similar motif in the Fossils part of his Carnival of the Animals.
[from Wikipedia]

Artwork:Remedios Varo,”Les Feuilles Mortes”.
Played by:National Philharmonic Orchestra,
conductor:Leopold Stokowski.

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Make Music Part of Your Life series: Gabriel Fauré – Élégie pour violoncelle et piano – Germaine Thyssens Valentin & Robert Salles


[youtube.com/watch?v=4gmTSWmRXGc]

Gabriel Fauré – Élégie pour violoncelle et piano
– Germaine Thyssens Valentin & Robert Salles

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Fauré in early middle age

The Élégie (Elegy), Op. 24, was written by the French composer Gabriel Fauré in 1880, and first published and performed in public in 1883. Originally for cello and piano, the piece was later orchestrated by Fauré. The work, in C minor, features a sad and sombre opening and climaxes with an intense, fast-paced central section, before the return of the elegiac opening theme.

Composition

In 1880, having completed his First Piano Quartet, Fauré began work on a cello sonata. It was his frequent practice to compose the slow movement of a work first, and he did so for the new sonata.[1] The completed movement was probably premiered at the salon of Camille Saint-Saëns in June 1880. The movement, like the quartet, is in the key of C minor. Whether the rest of the sonata would have been in that key is unknown: Fauré never completed it, and in January 1883 the slow movement was published as a stand-alone piece under the title Élégie.[1]

Jules Loeb, dedicatee and cellist at the premiere
Pablo Casals, who premiered the orchestral version

The first performance of the work under its new title was given at the Société Nationale de Musique in December 1883 by the composer and the cellist Jules Loeb to whom the piece is dedicated.[2][n 1] The Élégie was a great success from the outset,[1] and the conductor Édouard Colonne asked Fauré for a version for cello and orchestra. Fauré agreed, and that version was premiered at the Société Nationale in April 1901, with Pablo Casals as soloist and the composer as conductor.[2

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Great Compositions/Performances: Saint-Saëns – Violin Sonata No. 1 – Heifetz, Smith



Camille Saint-Saëns, Violin Sonata No. 1, Op. 75 (1885)

I. Allegro agitato
II. Adagio (6:45)
III. Allegro moderato (12:33)
IV. Allegro molto (16:13)

Jascha Heifetz, Brooks Smith

 

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Great Compostions/Performances: Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens


Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens

(2008 Annual Concert at Glenn Gould Studio Toronto Soloist:Emily Pei’En Fan Conductor: Tony Fan with Chinese Artists Society of Toronto Youth Orchestra)

Saint-Saens: Later years

In 1886 Saint-Saëns debuted two of his most renowned compositions: The Carnival of the Animals andSymphony No. 3, dedicated to Franz Liszt, who died that year. That same year, however, Vincent d’Indyand his allies had Saint-Saëns removed from the Société Nationale de Musique. Two years later, Saint-Saëns’s mother died, driving the mourning composer away from France to the Canary Islands under the alias “Sannois”. Over the next several years he travelled around the world, visiting exotic locations in Europe, North Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America. Saint-Saëns chronicled his travels in many popular books using his nom de plume, Sannois.

In 1908, he had the distinction of being the first celebrated composer to write a musical score to a motion picture, The Assassination of the Duke of Guise (L’assassinat du duc de Guise), directed by Charles Le Bargy and André Calmettes, adapted by Henri Lavedan, featuring actors of the Comédie Française. It was 18 minutes long, a considerable run time for the day.

In 1915, Saint-Saëns traveled to San Francisco, California and guest conducted the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra during the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, one of two world’s fairs celebrating the completion of the Panama Canal.

Saint-Saëns continued to write on musical, scientific and historical topics, travelling frequently before spending his last years in AlgiersAlgeria. In recognition of his accomplishments, the government of France awarded him the Légion d’honneur.

Saint-Saëns died of pneumonia on 16 December 1921 at the Hôtel de l’Oasis in Algiers. His body was repatriated to Paris, honoured by state funeral at La Madeleine, and interred at Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris.

Relationships with other composers

Saint-Saëns was either friend or enemy to some of Europe’s most distinguished musicians. He stayed close to Franz Liszt and maintained a fast friendship with his pupil Gabriel Fauré, who replaced him as organist and choirmaster when he retired. Additionally, he was a teacher and friend to Isidor Philipp, who headed the piano department at the Paris Conservatory for several decades and was a composer and editor of the music of many composers. But despite his strong advocacy of French music, Saint-Saëns openly despised many of his fellow-composers in France such as Franckd’Indy, and Massenet. Saint-Saëns also hated the music of Claude Debussy; he is reported to have told Pierre Lalo, music critic, and son of composer Édouard Lalo, “I have stayed in Paris to speak ill of Pelléas et Mélisande.” The personal animosity was mutual; Debussy quipped: “I have a horror of sentimentality, and I cannot forget that its name is Saint-Saëns.” On other occasions, however, Debussy acknowledged an admiration for Saint-Saëns’s musical talents.

Saint-Saëns had been an early champion of Richard Wagner‘s music in France, teaching his pieces during his tenure at the École Niedermeyer and premiering the March from Tannhäuser. He had stunned even Wagner himself when he sight-read the entire orchestral scores of LohengrinTristan und Isolde, andSiegfried, prompting Hans von Bülow to refer to him as, “the greatest musical mind” of the era. However, despite admitting appreciation for the power of Wagner’s work, Saint-Saëns defiantly stated that he was not an aficionado. In 1886, Saint-Saëns was punished for some particularly harsh and anti-German comments on the Paris production of Lohengrin by losing engagements and receiving negative reviews throughout Germany. Later, after World War I, Saint-Saëns angered both French and Germans with his inflammatory articles entitled Germanophilie, which ruthlessly attacked Wagner.[2]

Saint-Saëns edited Jean-Philippe Rameau‘s Pièces de clavecin, and published them in 1895 through Durand in Paris (re-printed by Dover in 1993).

On 29 May 1913, Saint-Saëns stormed out of the première of Igor Stravinsky‘s Le sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring), allegedly infuriated over what he considered the misuse of the bassoon in the ballet’s opening bars.

 

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Fantastic Composer/Compositions: Saint-Saens Clarinet Sonata op. 167 in E flat major



Clarinet: Richard Hosford 
Piano: Jan Brown
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

 

“Saint-Saens” redirects here. For the commune in Haute-Normandie, see Saint-Saëns, Seine-Maritime.

Camille Saint-Saëns

Charles-Camille Saint-Saëns 

(French pronunciation: ​[ʃaʁl kamij sɛ̃sɑ̃s];9 October 1835 – 16 December 1921) was a French composerorganistconductor, and pianist of the Romantic era. He is known especially for The Carnival of the AnimalsDanse macabreSamson and Delilah (Opera), Piano Concerto No. 2Cello Concerto No. 1HavanaiseIntroduction and Rondo Capriccioso, and his Symphony No. 3 (Organ Symphony).
Saint-Saëns was born in ParisFrance, on 9 October 1835. His father, a government clerk, died three months after his birth. He was raised by his mother, Clémence, with the assistance of her aunt, Charlotte Masson, who moved in. Masson introduced Saint-Saëns to the piano, and began giving him lessons on the instrument. At about this time, age two, Saint-Saëns was found to possess perfect pitch. His first composition, a little piece for the piano dated 22 March 1839, is now kept in the Bibliothèque nationale de France. Saint-Saëns’s precocity was not limited to music. He learned to read and write by the age of three, and had some mastery of Latin by the age of seven.

 

Fabulous Composers and compositions: Camille Saint-Saëns – Carnaval des Animaux



Prague Symphony Orchestra – Martin Turnovsky, Pavel Stepan & Ilja Hurnik – piano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Carnival of the Animals (Le carnaval des animaux) is a humorous musical suite of fourteen movements by the French Romantic composer Camille Saint-Saëns. Written for private performance by an ad hoc ensemble of two pianos and other instruments, the work lasts around 25 minutes.

Contents

 

Saint-Saëns: Piano Trio No. 1, Op. 18 in F major – II. Andante



Saint-Saëns was a romantic French composer. The music of video is the second movement of the Opus 18, played for Florestan Trio and was written in 1863.

 

Camille Saint-Saens ~ Carnival of the Animals



Performed by: Pianos: Neil and Nancy O’Doan Orchestra: Seattle Youth Symphony, conducted by Vilem Sokol.

Saint-Saëns Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso,Op.28-David Oistrakh (1955)



The Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso in A minor (French: Introduction et Rondo capriccioso en la mineur ), Op. 28, is a composition for violin and orchestra written in 1863 by Camille Saint-Saëns for the virtuoso violinist Pablo de Sarasate. Since its 19th-century premiere, it has continued to be one of Saint-Saëns’s most popular compositions

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