Tag Archives: Canada

Igloos An igloo, which means “house” in the Inuit language, is a traditional, dome-shaped Eskimo dwelling with a low tunnel entrance constructed of blocks of snow placed in an ascending spiral. Although igloos are commonly associated with the Inuit, they were predominantly constructed by people of Canada’s Central Arctic and Greenland’s Thule area. What is a kudlik, and how did it help strengthen the structural integrity of igloos? More… Discuss


Igloos

An igloo, which means “house” in the Inuit language, is a traditional, dome-shaped Eskimo dwelling with a low tunnel entrance constructed of blocks of snow placed in an ascending spiral. Although igloos are commonly associated with the Inuit, they were predominantly constructed by people of Canada’s Central Arctic and Greenland’s Thule area. What is a kudlik, and how did it help strengthen the structural integrity of igloos? More… Discuss

historic musical bits: David Oistrakh plays Variations on a theme of Corelli


David Oistrakh plays Variations on a theme of Corelli

Historic Musical Bits: David Oistrakh plays Variations on a theme of Corelli


David Oistrakh plays Variations on a theme of Corelli

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History? Here is what! Well, some of it anyway!


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
January 15

1624   Riots flare in Mexico when it is announced that all churches are to be closed.
1811   In a secret session, Congress plans to annex Spanish East Florida.
1865   Union troops capture Fort Fisher, North Carolina.
1913   The first telephone line between Berlin and New York is inaugurated.
1919   Peasants in Central Russia rise against the Bolsheviks.
1920   The Dry Law goes into effect in the United States. Selling liquor and beer becomes illegal.
1920   The United States approves a $150 million loan to Poland, Austria and Armenia to aid in their war with the Russian communists.
1927   The Dumbarton Bridge opens in San Francisco carrying the first auto traffic across the bay.
1929   The U.S. Senate ratifies the Kellogg-Briand anti-war pact.
1930   Amelia Earhart sets an aviation record for women at 171 mph in a Lockheed Vega.
1936   In London, Japan quits all naval disarmament talks after being denied equality.
1944   The U.S. Fifth Army successfully breaks the German Winter Line in Italy with the capture of Mount Trocchio.
1949   Chinese Communists occupy Tientsin after a 27-hour battle with Nationalist forces.
1965   Sir Winston Churchill suffers a severe stroke.
1967   Some 462 Yale faculty members call for an end to the bombing in North Vietnam.
1973   US President Richard Nixon announces the suspension of offensive action by US troops in Vietnam.
1973   Four of six remaining Watergate defendants plead guilty.
1975   The Alvor Agreement is signed, ending the Angolan War of independence and granting that country independence from Portugal.
1976   Sara Jane Moore sentenced to life in prison for her failed attempt to assassinate US President Gerald Ford.
1991   UN deadline for Iraq to withdraw its forces from occupied Kuwait passes, setting the stage for Operation Desert Storm.
1991   Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II approves Australia instituting its own Victoria Cross honors system, the first county in the British Commonwealth permitted to do so.
1992   Slovenia and Croatia’s independence from the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia is recognized by the international community.
2001   Wikipedia goes online.
Born on January 15
1622   Moliere [Jean Baptiste Poquelin], French comic dramatist best remembered for his play La Tartuffe.
1716   Philip Livingston, signatory to the Declaration of Independence.
1823   Mathew Brady, Civil War photographer.
1906   Aristotle Onassis, Greek tycoon.
1908   Edward Teller, Hungarian-born U.S. physicist known as the “Father of the H-bomb.”
1929   Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights leader and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.
1945   Princess Michael of Kent (Baroness Marie Christine Anna Agnes Hedwig Ida von Reibnitz), married to Prince Michael of Kent, grandson of Britain’s King George V.
1948   Ronnie Van Zant, singer, songwriter; founding member of Lynyrd Skynyrd band.
1982   Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.NR1E2Wb9.dpuf

Quotation: Ignorance… is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it. George Eliot


Ignorance… is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

this pressed: Inspector general: Some NY police use chokehold as first response|info 24.us


NEW YORK (Reuters) – A new inspector general blasted the New York City Police Department on Monday for failing to punish officers who used banned chokeholds on citizens, sometimes as a first response in a confrontation.

The first official report by police Inspector General Philip Eure comes a month after New York was shaken first by a grand jury’s decision not to indict an NYPD officer in the chokehold death of Eric Garner and then by the killing of two NYPD officers by a gunman avenging the Staten Island man’s death.

It looked at 10 recent cases in which the NYPD’s Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), an independent agency tasked with investigating excessive force claims, concluded officers used chokeholds, which are banned by police department regulations. The cases were documented between 2009 and July 2014 and do not include Garner’s death on July 17, 2014.

Among the 10 cases was a Bronx high school student who was walking away from school officials disciplining her on Jan. 8, 2008, and was placed in a chokehold by a police officer assigned to the building, the report said.

EW YORK (Reuters) – A new inspector general blasted the New York City Police Department on Monday for failing to punish officers who used banned chokeholds on citizens, sometimes as a first response in a confrontation.

The first official report by police Inspector General Philip Eure comes a month after New York was shaken first by a grand jury’s decision not to indict an NYPD officer in the chokehold death of Eric Garner and then by the killing of two NYPD officers by a gunman avenging the Staten Island man’s death.

It looked at 10 recent cases in which the NYPD’s Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), an independent agency tasked with investigating excessive force claims, concluded officers used chokeholds, which are banned by police department regulations. The cases were documented between 2009 and July 2014 and do not include Garner’s death on July 17, 2014.

Among the 10 cases was a Bronx high school student who was walking away from school officials disciplining her on Jan. 8, 2008, and was placed in a chokehold by a police officer assigned to the building, the report said.

via Inspector general: Some NY police use chokehold as first response.

Saint of the Day for Monday, January 12th, 2015: St. Marguerite Bourgeoys


today’s birthday: John A. Macdonald (1815)


John A. Macdonald (1815)

Macdonald was the first prime minister of Canada, serving from 1867 to 1873 and from 1878 to 1891. He played a crucial role in expanding Canada‘s territories to include the Northwest Territories and British Columbia and earned much praise for his role in forging a nation of sprawling geographic size, with two disparate European colonial origins and a multiplicity of cultural backgrounds and political views. What was the Pacific scandal, and how did it affect Macdonald’s career? More… Discuss

Two brothers arrested on terrorism charges in Canada (terrorism is NOT a religion)


OTTAWA, OntarioRoyal Canadian Mounted Police say two brothers have been arrested and charged with terrorism related offences.

In a statement police said that Ashton Carleton Larmond and Carlos Larmond, both 25, were planning to leave Canada to engage in terrorist activities abroad.

Police say Ashton Larmond is charged with facilitating terrorist activity among other charges.

Carlos Larmond faces charges of participation in the activity of a terrorist group and attempting to leave Canada to participate in terrorist activity abroad.

via Two brothers arrested on terrorism charges in Canada.

This Day in History: Frankenstein Is Published (1818)


This Day in History

Frankenstein Is Published (1818)

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley‘s Frankenstein, or, the Modern Prometheus is a gothic novel that spawned a new genre of horror stories. It tells the story of Frankenstein, a scientist who discovers how to bring inanimate matter to life and, in the process, creates a man-monster. When Frankenstein fails to provide a mate to satisfy the creature’s human emotions, it seeks revenge. Mary Shelley came up with the idea for the novel while vacationing at the home of what famous poet? More… Discuss

From Project Gutenberg (widget on sidebar): THe Devil’s Dictionary, by Ambrose Bierce (downloadable HTML, TXT and AUDIO


widget: Project Gutenberg at euzicasa

widget: Project Gutenberg at euzicasa

The Devil’s Dictionary

Ambrose Bierce

This audio reading of The Devil’s Dictionary is read by

Peter Yearsley, Chip, John Hicken, Kathy, Geetu Melwani, Michael Kirkpatrick, Kara Shallenberg, Denny Sayers, Fox in the Stars, Kevin Devine, Gesine, David Barnes, Aldark, dreamword

Contents (SampleS) 17 sections: Preface, and Letters A-Z (like the ones bellow)

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23080/mp3/23080-01.mp3

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23080/mp3/23080-15.mp3

Librivox Audio Recording Public Domain Certification:

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this pressed for your curious mind: 13 of the Most Amazing Things Discovered in Space This Year | WIRED (I thought they found Santa too, or did they?)


In April, astronomers discovered the first Earth-size planet within a star’s habitable zone, the region where liquid water can exist. This artist’s concept shows the planet, dubbed Kepler-186f, which is 1.1 times the size of Earth. The ultimate goal is to find another planet just like Earth, and this one—although more like a cousin than a twin—is close. NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech

Scientists discovered some pretty amazing things in space this year. There were yet more planets, including the first Earth-like one in a star’s habitable zone. Astronomers found what might be a black-hole triplet, stars in the midst of merging into one giant one, and a star made of diamond.

More Best of 2014:

The Best and Worst of Science in 2014

These Are Our Favorite Maps of the Year

The Best Science Visualizations of 2014

But some of the most exciting things were found right in our own solar system. These discoveries include the first rings ever seen around an asteroid, plumes of water vapor spewing out from the dwarf planet Ceres, a disintegrating asteroid, and what appears to be a new dwarf planet billions of miles away. Oh, and we landed on a comet for the first time. Here are some of the most fantastic

via 13 of the Most Amazing Things Discovered in Space This Year | WIRED.

word: skimpy


skimpy 

Definition: (adjective) Containing little excess.
Synonyms: lean
Usage: When the car repairs maxed out my already skimpy budget, I knew my shopping days were over. Discuss.

this day in the yesteryear: Kecksburg UFO Incident (1965)


Kecksburg UFO Incident (1965)

Many believe that the large fireball observed in the sky above Ontario, Canada, and at least six US states in 1965 was nothing more than a passing meteor. However, some witnesses in the small town of Kecksburg, Pennsylvania, claim a car-sized, acorn-shaped object with hieroglyphic-like markings crashed in a nearby wood and was then carted off by the military. Government officials long denied these allegations, but 40 years later, in 2005, NASA made what admission regarding the suspicious object? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Tellabration


Tellabration

A nationwide night of storytelling, Tellabration was started in 1988 by storyteller J. G. (“Paw-Paw”) Pinkerton. The event began with storytelling in six communities in Connecticut. The next year, Texas and Missouri also had Tellabrations, and, by 1991, storytelling on this night was happening in 72 communities in 27 states, as well as in locations in Bermuda and Canada. Eventually, the length of Tellabrations extended to a weekend. Proceeds of the event go toward developing the archives of Storytelling Foundation International in Jonesborough, Tennessee. More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Thursday, November 20th, 2014: St. Edmund Rich


most retweets / favores — Best Quotes (@QuoteAficionado) November 11, 2014


Prince Edward Island


Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a Canadian province situated in the Maritimes. It is the nation’s smallest province in both size and population, but it has Canada‘s highest population density. With its fertile, distinctive red soil and its agreeable climate, the island has become known as the Garden of the Gulf. Tourism and fishing contribute to the island’s economy, and there may be natural gas deposits beneath its eastern end. What Canadian author and PEI native set most of her novels there? More… Discuss

Experts say Ebola virus unlikely to spread to North America | CTV Calgary News


Kathy Mueller, a former CTV news anchor, recently returned to Canada from Sierra Leone where she assisted the Red Cross dead body management team.

“While we were laying one person to rest, the grave next to them was being dug,” said Mueller. “It was a constant conveyor belt of burials.”

More than 1,200 people have contracted the Ebola virus in Liberia and the virus has claimed the lives of nearly 700 people.

via Experts say Ebola virus unlikely to spread to North America | CTV Calgary News.

Le Liberia apprend à vivre avec le virus Ebola http://t.co/rG63x00kNS pic.twitter.com/hIuApC1RQn — RFI (@RFI)


this pressed- for the need to know: Chomsky: Business Elites Are Waging a Brutal Class War in America | Alternet


Noam Chomsky Photo Credit: Flickr/Andrew Rusk

 

We don’t use the term “working class” here because it’s a taboo term. You’re supposed to say “middle class,” because it helps diminish the understanding that there’s a class war going on.

It’s true that there was a one-sided class war, and that’s because the other side hadn’t chosen to participate, so the union leadership had for years pursued a policy of making a compact with the corporations, in which their workers, say the autoworkers—would get certain benefits like fairly decent wages, health benefits and so on. But it wouldn’t engage the general class structure. In fact, that’s one of the reasons why Canada has a national health program and the United States doesn’t. The same unions on the other side of the border were calling for health care for everybody. Here they were calling for health care for themselves and they got it. Of course, it’s a compact with corporations that the corporations can break anytime they want, and by the 1970s they were planning to break it and we’ve seen what has happened since.

This is just one part of a long and continuing class war against working people and the poor. It’s a war that is conducted by a highly class-conscious business leadership, and it’s one of the reasons for the unusual history of the U.S. labor movement. In the U.S., organized labor has been repeatedly and extensively crushed, and has endured a very violent history as compared with other countries.

via Chomsky: Business Elites Are Waging a Brutal Class War in America | Alternet.

today’s birthday: Henry Heinz (1844)


Henry Heinz (1844)

Heinz was a pioneer in the American food industry. He got an early start in the food business, peddling surplus home-grown vegetables to neighbors by the age of eight. In 1876, he, his brother, and a cousin founded a pickles and condiments company that became the H. J. Heinz Company when he bought them out in 1888. The company’s tomato ketchup quickly became a bestseller and remains the most popular ketchup in the US today. Why did Heinz make “57 varieties” his company slogan? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Quebec’s Pierre Laporte Kidnapped (1970)


Quebec’s Pierre Laporte Kidnapped (1970)

The separatist Quebec Liberation Front (FLQ) formed in the 1960s to bring about the independence of predominantly French Quebec from the rest of Canada. To achieve this aim, the FLQ carried out various terrorist activities, including the 1970 kidnapping of Quebec’s Minister of Labor Pierre Laporte and British diplomat James Cross. This touched off the October Crisis and led the Canadian government to assume sweeping emergency powers to combat the insurrection. What happened to Cross and Laporte? More… Discuss

News: Norway Best Country for Older People


Norway Best Country for Older People

Growing old is never easy, but for some it is easier than others, and where they live has a lot to do with it. An index evaluating the quality of life of older adults in 96 countries around the globe has ranked Norway the best country in the world for older people, followed closely by Sweden, Switzerland, Canada, and Germany. Australia, Western Europe, and North America also rank high on the list. The index weighs factors such as income security, health, personal capability, and whether the elderly live in an “enabling environment.” More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Labor Day


Labor Day

The first Labor Day observance in 1882 was confined to New York City. Oregon, in 1887, was the first state to make it a legal holiday, and, in 1894, President Grover Cleveland signed a bill making it a national holiday. The holiday’s association with trade unions has declined, but it remains important as the end of the summer season for schoolchildren and as an opportunity for friends and families to get together for picnics and sporting events. Labor Day is observed on the first Monday in September throughout the US, in Canada, and in Puerto Rico. More… Discuss

this pressed: Ebola Outbreak in Sierra Leone Is Tied to One Funeral – NYTimes.com


Sierra Leone’s explosion of Ebola cases in early summer all appears to stem from one traditional healer’s funeral at which 14 women were infected, according to scientists studying the blood of victims.

The funeral, which took place in mid-May, constitutes a “super-spreader” event comparable to a 2003 one in a Hong Kong hotel in which one doctor from China dying of SARS infected nine other guests who spread the virus throughout the city and to Vietnam and Canada.”

via Ebola Outbreak in Sierra Leone Is Tied to One Funeral – NYTimes.com.

this day in the yesteryear: British Columbia Joins Confederation of Canada (1871)


British Columbia Joins Confederation of Canada (1871)

In the years leading up to British Columbia’s entrance into the Confederation of Canada, a series of gold rushes prompted financial crises in the region as well as fears that the US might attempt to annex the British colony. In 1871, British Columbia became the Confederation’s sixth province, strengthening Canada’s hand in international trade. In return, Canada assumed a large portion of the province’s debt. What is the meaning of British Columbia’s Latin motto, “Splendor sine occasu”? More…

today’s holiday: ‘Ksan Celebrations


‘Ksan Celebrations

On Friday evenings in July and August, dances and accompanying songs are performed by the ‘Ksan, or Gitxsan, Indians in a longhouse in the Indian Village in Hazelton, British Columbia, Canada. The dances are said to go back to pre-history; they were revived in 1958, and the ‘Ksan dancers have since performed in New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, Kansas City, Missouri, and even Australia. Performers must be Git ‘Ksan, meaning “People of the ‘Ksan” (named after the nearby Skeena River). More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Nunavut Day


Nunavut Day

Canada’s northernmost territory of Nunavut was established on July 9, 1993, through a land claim signed by the national government and the Inuit of the Nunavut Settlement Area. Most of the day’s activities take place in Nunavut’s hub and capital city, Iqaluit. Festivities include barbeques, parades, traditional Inuit games, and feasts featuring local cuisine of caribou, walrus, and arctic char. In recent years, the day’s program has also included organized tournaments of cribbage, checkers, and Scrabble. More… Discuss

word: harbinger


harbinger 

Definition: (noun) One that indicates or foreshadows what is to come.
Synonyms: herald, precursor, forerunner
Usage: The grim and persistent harbinger of evil aroused the man to renewed determination. Discuss.

Promises, promises, poetic thought by George-B


Promises, promises, poetic thought by George-B

A promise I made
To myself
I will not be bored
I will learn to not be bored
To find the elements in
Things
People
Water
Air
Dirt
Fire
That will be interesting
Enough
Not to bore me
To look for antiboring-antiboring-anti
Behavior
thumb sucking
Smoking whatever
Drinking to unbore
And immature mature relationships
Turning to be boring now I
Walk away from boring
And get fit as I walk, and now
I can tell what’s boring
I can unbore and stay that way
Way to go

I’m on my way…

today’s holiday: National Aboriginal Day


National Aboriginal Day

Long before a national holiday was established, this day of the year had been observed by Canada’s Inuit, Métis, and First Nations peoples as a celebration of Aboriginal heritage. In 1996, the Canadian government made June 21 an official holiday, including all citizens in the observance. Celebrations take place throughout Canada, and are organized by the regional offices of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Canadian Heritage. Some festivities are modest celebrations; others exhibit a stronger focus on culture and tradition by holding canoe races, powwows, and awareness events. More… Discuss

make music part of your life series: Yves Montand – Le temps des cerises


[youtube.com/watch?v=ncs4WlWfIZo]

Please access the original video for comments and lyrics!

Le Temps des Cerises

Quand nous en serons au temps des cerises
Et gai rossignol et merle moqueur
Seront tous en fête
Les belles auront la folie en tête
Et les amoureux du soleil au cœur

Quand nous chanterons le temps des cerises
Sifflera bien mieux le merle moqueur
Mais il est bien court le temps des cerises
Où l’on s’en va deux cueillir en rêvant
Des pendants d’oreilles
Cerises d’amour aux robes pareilles
Tombant sous la feuille en gouttes de sang
Mais il est bien court le temps des cerises
Pendants de corail qu’on cueille en rêvant

Quand vous en serez au temps des cerises
Si vous avez peur des chagrins d’amour
Evitez les belles Moi qui ne crains pas les peines cruelles
Je ne vivrai pas sans souffrir un jour
Quand vous en serez au temps des cerises
Vous aurez aussi des chagrins d’amour

J’aimerai toujours le temps des cerises
C’est de ce temps-là que je garde au cœur
Une plaie ouverte
Et Dame Fortune, en m’étant offerte
Ne saura jamais calmer ma douleur
J’aimerai toujours le temps des cerises
Et le souvenir que je garde au cœur

— lyrics by Jean-Baptiste Clément and music by Antoine Renard

 

Georges Brassens: La Prière (The Prayer)


[youtube.com/watch?v=Uy2KiwjqE2Q]

La Prière

Par le petit garçon qui meurt près de sa mère
Tandis que des enfants s’amusent au parterre
Et par l’oiseau blessé qui ne sait pas comment
Son aile tout à coup s’ensanglante et descend
Par la soif et la faim et le délire ardent
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par les gosses battus, par l’ivrogne qui rentre
Par l’âne qui reçoit des coups de pied au ventre
Et par l’humiliation de l’innocent châtié
Par la vierge vendue qu’on a déshabillée
Par le fils dont la mère a été insultée
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par la vieille qui, trébuchant sous trop de poids
S’écrie: ” Mon Dieu ! ” par le malheureux dont les bras
Ne purent s’appuyer sur une amour humaine
Comme la Croix du Fils sur Simon de Cyrène
Par le cheval tombé sous le chariot qu’il traîne
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par les quatre horizons qui crucifient le monde
Par tous ceux dont la chair se déchire ou succombe
Par ceux qui sont sans pieds, par ceux qui sont sans mains
Par le malade que l’on opère et qui geint
Et par le juste mis au rang des assassins
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par la mère apprenant que son fils est guéri
Par l’oiseau rappelant l’oiseau tombé du nid
Par l’herbe qui a soif et recueille l’ondée
Par le baiser perdu par l’amour redonné
Et par le mendiant retrouvant sa monnaie
Je vous salue, Marie.

The Prayer

For the little boy who lays dying close to his mother
While children play on the flower bed
And for the wounded bird that doesn’t know how
His wing became suddenly bloody and falls from the sky
For the thirst and the hunger and the feverous delirium
Hail, Mary

For the beaten children, for the drunk who returns home
For the ass who gets kicked in the stomach
And for the humiliation of the innocents who are punished
For the sold virgin that is undressed
For the son whose mother has been insulted
Hail, Mary

For the old woman who stumbles under too much weight
Exclaiming “My God!”, for the unfortunate ones whose arms
Couldn’t rely on a human love
Like Simon of Cyrene bearing the Cross of the Son
For the fallen horse under the chariot that it drags
Hail, Mary

For the four horizons that crucify the world
For all those whose flesh is torn or dies
For all those who are without feet, who are without hands
For the sick that are operated on and moan
And for the just put among the ranks of killers
Hail, Mary

For the mother learning that her son is healed
For the bird calling the fallen bird back to the nest
For the thirsty grass that gathers rain
For the lost kiss returned by love
And for the beggar who finds his money again
Hail, Mary

health and environment: Recession Responsible for 10,000 Suicides


Recession Responsible for 10,000 Suicides

Researchers are attributing an uptick in suicides in North America and Europe to the recent economic crisis. An analysis of data from 24 European countries, the US, and Canada attributes 10,000 suicides to the recession. It is perhaps not surprising that unemployment, losing one’s home, or being in debt drives some to take their own lives, but it is interesting to note that this is not the case everywhere. Austria, Sweden, and Finland showed no increase in suicides. All three invest in programs that help people return to work, suggesting that there are ways to mitigate the psychological burden brought on by economic troubles. More…

article: Totem Poles


Totem Poles

Totem poles are towering sculptures carved from trees by a number of Native American peoples along the Pacific Northwest coast of North America. They display mythological images, usually animal spirits. The poles

Totem poles in front of houses in Alert Bay, B...

Totem poles in front of houses in Alert Bay, British Columbia in the 1900s. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

are erected to identify the owner of a house or other property, welcome visitors, indicate a portal or passageway, mark a gravesite, and even to ridicule an important person who failed in some way. Why was this last type of pole—a “shame pole”—erected in Cordova, Alaska, in 2007? More… Discuss

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Pregnancy Linked to Elevated Crash Risk


Pregnancy Linked to Elevated Crash Risk

Pregnant women may want to keep off the roads after learning this statistic: women in their second trimester are 42 percent more likely to be involved in a car crash that sends them to the hospital than they were prior to becoming pregnant. Why this is remains to be determined, but researchers suspect that the physical effects of pregnancy at this stage—fatigue, nausea, anxiety, mood fluctuations—can lead to distractedness behind the wheel. More… Discuss

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article: Maple Syrup


Maple Syrup

A popular topping for pancakes, waffles, French toast, and the like, maple syrup comes from the sap of sugar maple and black maple trees. In springtime, taps inserted in the trees begin flowing with sap, which is collected, strained, and concentrated by boiling. Native Americans were the first to prepare syrup from maple sap, using hot rocks or freezing to concentrate the sap. They shared their methods with arriving colonists—and the rest is history. What is produced by boiling down maple syrup? More… Discuss

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Music, Food fro the Soul: Relaxing Spa Music Long Time Mix By Spavevo


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ARTICLE: Niagara Falls


Niagara Falls

Niagara Falls is a set of three spectacular waterfalls located on the US-Canadian border. The Horseshoe Falls, American Falls, and Bridal Veil Falls are renowned for their beauty, and Niagara Falls as a whole is both a valuable source of hydroelectric power and a challenging project for environmental preservation. It is also a popular site for daredevils. In 1901, Annie Edson Taylor became the first person to go over the falls in a barrel. She survived and had what to say about the experience? More… Discuss

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WORD: panacea


panacea 

Definition: (noun) A remedy for all diseases, evils, or difficulties.
Synonyms: cure-all
Usage: Here the glib politician crying his legislative panaceas, and here the peripatetic Cheap-Jack holding aloft his quack cures for human ills. Discuss.
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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov, Les Ruses d’amour, Op. 61, Scene VII Grande Valse


TODAY’S SAINTS: ST. MARGUERITE D’YOUVILLE April 11 (Foundress of the Sisters of Charity, the Grey Nuns of Canada)


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 11 Saint of the Day

ST. MARGUERITE D’YOUVILLE
April 11: Foundress of the Sisters of Charity, the Grey Nuns of Canada. … Read More

April
11

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: COMMONWEALTH DAY


Commonwealth Day

From 1903 until 1957, this holiday in honor of the British Empire was known as Empire Day and celebrated on May 24, Queen Victoria‘s birthday. Between 1958 and 1966, it was called British Commonwealth Day. Then it was switched to Queen Elizabeth II‘s official birthday in June, and the name was shortened to Commonwealth Day. It is now observed annually on the second Monday in March. In Canada it is still celebrated on May 24 (or the Monday before) and referred to as Victoria Day. More… Discuss

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NEWS: ENERGY DRINKS AND TEENS


Energy Drinks and Teens

If your teen frequently consumes energy drinks, this could be a red flag that he or she engages in other risky behaviors. A Canadian study found that high school students who reported a higher frequency of energy drink use were more likely to also feel depressed, engage in risk-taking behaviors, drink alcohol, and use drugs. Energy drinks’ marketing campaigns may be somewhat to blame for the association, as they are designed make the products seem extreme and exciting. This likely increases their appeal to young people, especially those already prone to sensation seekingMore… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: CURLING


Curling

Curling is a team sport in which players slide heavy stones with handles toward a target or “tee.” The stones closest to the tee at the end of play earn points. After a stone is hurled, players called “sweepers” use special brooms to sweep the ice ahead of the stone. This affords them some measure of control over the stone’s trajectory and allows them to get it closer to the tee or even knock away or block the opposing team’s stones. Though curling is very popular in Canada, it originated where? More…

 

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A WordPress Photo Challenge: “Abandoned – Towns of Yesteryears – Ghost Towns of Today” (Access a Ghost Town Here) (A new Widget at euzicasa)


Towns of Yesteryears - Ghost Towns of Today

Towns of Yesteryears – Ghost Towns of Today (Access a ghost town here)

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Great Compostions/Performances: Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens


Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens

(2008 Annual Concert at Glenn Gould Studio Toronto Soloist:Emily Pei’En Fan Conductor: Tony Fan with Chinese Artists Society of Toronto Youth Orchestra)

Saint-Saens: Later years

In 1886 Saint-Saëns debuted two of his most renowned compositions: The Carnival of the Animals andSymphony No. 3, dedicated to Franz Liszt, who died that year. That same year, however, Vincent d’Indyand his allies had Saint-Saëns removed from the Société Nationale de Musique. Two years later, Saint-Saëns’s mother died, driving the mourning composer away from France to the Canary Islands under the alias “Sannois”. Over the next several years he travelled around the world, visiting exotic locations in Europe, North Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America. Saint-Saëns chronicled his travels in many popular books using his nom de plume, Sannois.

In 1908, he had the distinction of being the first celebrated composer to write a musical score to a motion picture, The Assassination of the Duke of Guise (L’assassinat du duc de Guise), directed by Charles Le Bargy and André Calmettes, adapted by Henri Lavedan, featuring actors of the Comédie Française. It was 18 minutes long, a considerable run time for the day.

In 1915, Saint-Saëns traveled to San Francisco, California and guest conducted the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra during the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, one of two world’s fairs celebrating the completion of the Panama Canal.

Saint-Saëns continued to write on musical, scientific and historical topics, travelling frequently before spending his last years in AlgiersAlgeria. In recognition of his accomplishments, the government of France awarded him the Légion d’honneur.

Saint-Saëns died of pneumonia on 16 December 1921 at the Hôtel de l’Oasis in Algiers. His body was repatriated to Paris, honoured by state funeral at La Madeleine, and interred at Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris.

Relationships with other composers

Saint-Saëns was either friend or enemy to some of Europe’s most distinguished musicians. He stayed close to Franz Liszt and maintained a fast friendship with his pupil Gabriel Fauré, who replaced him as organist and choirmaster when he retired. Additionally, he was a teacher and friend to Isidor Philipp, who headed the piano department at the Paris Conservatory for several decades and was a composer and editor of the music of many composers. But despite his strong advocacy of French music, Saint-Saëns openly despised many of his fellow-composers in France such as Franckd’Indy, and Massenet. Saint-Saëns also hated the music of Claude Debussy; he is reported to have told Pierre Lalo, music critic, and son of composer Édouard Lalo, “I have stayed in Paris to speak ill of Pelléas et Mélisande.” The personal animosity was mutual; Debussy quipped: “I have a horror of sentimentality, and I cannot forget that its name is Saint-Saëns.” On other occasions, however, Debussy acknowledged an admiration for Saint-Saëns’s musical talents.

Saint-Saëns had been an early champion of Richard Wagner‘s music in France, teaching his pieces during his tenure at the École Niedermeyer and premiering the March from Tannhäuser. He had stunned even Wagner himself when he sight-read the entire orchestral scores of LohengrinTristan und Isolde, andSiegfried, prompting Hans von Bülow to refer to him as, “the greatest musical mind” of the era. However, despite admitting appreciation for the power of Wagner’s work, Saint-Saëns defiantly stated that he was not an aficionado. In 1886, Saint-Saëns was punished for some particularly harsh and anti-German comments on the Paris production of Lohengrin by losing engagements and receiving negative reviews throughout Germany. Later, after World War I, Saint-Saëns angered both French and Germans with his inflammatory articles entitled Germanophilie, which ruthlessly attacked Wagner.[2]

Saint-Saëns edited Jean-Philippe Rameau‘s Pièces de clavecin, and published them in 1895 through Durand in Paris (re-printed by Dover in 1993).

On 29 May 1913, Saint-Saëns stormed out of the première of Igor Stravinsky‘s Le sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring), allegedly infuriated over what he considered the misuse of the bassoon in the ballet’s opening bars.

 

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Léo Ferré – L’oppression


Léo Ferré – L’oppression

Tiré du DVD “Sur la scène” (1972/1973 Olympia)

L’oppression

Ces mains bonnes à tout même à tenir des armes
Dans ces rues que les hommes ont tracées pour ton bien
Ces rivages perdus vers lesquels tu t’acharnes
Où tu veux aborder
Et pour t’en empêcher
Les mains de l’oppression

Regarde-la gémir sur la gueule des gens
Avec les yeux fardés d’horaires et de rêves
Regarde-là se taire aux gorges du printemps
Avec les mains trahies par la faim qui se lève

Ces yeux qui te regardent et la nuit et le jour
Et que l’on dit braqués sur les chiffres et la haine
Ces choses “défendues” vers lesquelles tu te traînes
Et qui seront à toi
Lorsque tu fermeras
Les yeux de l’oppression

Regarde-la pointer son sourire indécent
Sur la censure apprise et qui va à la messe
Regarde-la jouir dans ce jouet d’enfant
Et qui tue des fantômes en perdant ta jeunesse

Ces lois qui t’embarrassent au point de les nier
Dans les couloirs glacés de la nuit conseillère
Et l’Amour qui se lève à l’Université
Et qui t’envahira
Lorsque tu casseras
Les lois de l’oppression

Regarde-la flâner dans l’il de tes copains
Sous le couvert joyeux de soleils fraternels
Regarde-la glisser peu à peu dans leurs mains
Qui formerons des poings
Dès qu’ils auront atteint
L’âge de l’oppression

Ces yeux qui te regardent et la nuit et le jour
Et que l’on dit braqués sur les chiffres et la haine
Ces choses “défendues” vers lesquelles tu te traînes
Et qui seront à toi
Lorsque tu fermeras
Les yeux de l’oppression

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: SOVIET SATELLITE BREAKS UP UPON REENTRY, SCATTERING NUCLEAR DEBRIS (1978)


Soviet Satellite Breaks Up upon Reentry, Scattering Nuclear Debris (1978)

Cosmos 954 was a Soviet reconnaissance satellite that used radar to observe ocean traffic. It was launched in September 1977 and quickly began to experience problems. Within months, it had deviated from its designed orbit. A malfunction prevented the safe separation of its onboard nuclear reactor, so when the satellite reentered the Earth’s atmosphere, it scattered radioactive debris over northern Canada, necessitating an extensive clean-up operation. How much did Canada bill the USSR for this? More… Discuss

 

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