Tag Archives: Caribbean

this day in the yesteryear: William G. Morgan Invents Volleyball (1895)


William G. Morgan Invents Volleyball (1895)

William G. Morgan invented volleyball in Holyoke, Massachusetts, just four years after basketball was invented in the neighboring town of Springfield. Morgan, a physical education director, created “Mintonette” for older athletes who wanted to play indoor sports but deemed basketball too rough. The name volleyball came from the nature of the game: “volleying” a ball back and forth over a net. Players can also “spike” the ball and drive it downward into the opponents’ court. What is a “pancake”? More… Discuss

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quotation: “Habits in writing as in life are only useful if they are broken as soon as they cease to be advantageous.” W. Somerset Maugham


Habits in writing as in life are only useful if they are broken as soon as they cease to be advantageous.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

today’s birthday: Isaac Asimov (1920)


Isaac Asimov (1920)

Asimov was an exceptionally prolific Russian-American author who achieved great success with his science-fiction and popular science books. Along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, he was considered one of the “Big Three” science-fiction authors of his era. Though best known for his scientific works, Asimov wrote on a diverse range of subjects, including the Bible and Shakespeare, penning more than 400 volumes in all. What robot-related term did he coin in the course of his writings? More… Discuss

The World’s Longest Escalators


The World’s Longest Escalators

The escalator has come a long way since being patented in 1859. Hong Kong’s Central-Mid-Levels escalator system is one of the world’s most impressive, stretching about 2,600 feet (790 m). Colombia boasts a 1,260-foot (384-m) set of escalators that transformed a 35-minute foot climb into a six-minute ride. The longest single-span escalator in the Western Hemisphere can be found in the Wheaton Metro station in Washington, DC. How long does it take riders to ascend this 230-foot (70-m) escalator? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Antigua National Heroes Day


Antigua National Heroes Day

Antigua has four citizens who have been designated as National Heroes, and December 9 is a public holiday to honor and celebrate all of them. The date is the birthday of one of the four, Sir Vere Cornwall Bird, the first prime minister of Antigua, who is considered the father of the nation. The others are King Court, who led a slave revolt in 1736; Dame Ellen Georgian Nellie Robinson, a pioneer in education; and Sir Vivian Richards, one of the world’s greatest cricket players. Speeches and ceremonies honor the accomplishments of the National Heroes on this day. More… Discuss

this pressed from – BBC Sport – Jimmy Neesham’s bat drilled with holes by US customs officials


Jimmy NeeshamBBC Sport – Jimmy Neesham’s bat drilled with holes by US customs officials.

Jimmy Neesham’s bat drilled with holes by US customs officials

New Zealand all-rounder Jimmy Neesham had holes drilled into his bat by United States customs officials during an apparent drugs search.

Jimmy Neesham bat

Neesham’s bat showed at least four holes following its brush with customs officials

Neesham, 23, was travelling in America with Caribbean Premier League side Guyana Amazon Warriors when his bat was inspected on Thursday.

The ruined bat was returned to Neesham, who posted a picture of it on Twitter. 

“Imagine if your gear went through America and they drilled holes in your bat to look for drugs,” he said.

There is no suggestion Neesham, who has played four Tests and 11 one-day internationals, was under any suspicion by the customs officials.

While the bat is unlikely to be swung in anger again, it may yet have a future as a museum piece.

today’s holiday: Hurricane Supplication Day


Hurricane Supplication Day

Observed in the U.S. Virgin Islands—St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John—Hurricane Supplication Day marks the beginning of the hurricane season. Special church services are held to pray for safety from the storms that ravage these and other Caribbean islands. The custom probably dates back to the “rogation” ceremonies (from the word rogare, meaning “to beg or supplicate”), which began in fifth-century England. Rogations usually followed a frightening series of storms, earthquakes, or other natural disasters. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Merengue Festival


Merengue Festival

The merengue is a lively Caribbean dance that originated in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. The world’s most famous merengue festival takes place in Santo Domingo, the Dominican Republic’s capital city, where outdoor stages are set up along the city’s waterfront, and top bands play merengue music while couples swirl and shake to the fast-paced, pulsating rhythms. In addition to watching the performances and competitions among merengue dancers, festivalgoers can enjoy the music of DJs and bands on the street, imbibe rum and beer, and eat the signature pork sandwiches, chimichurris. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Bahamas Independence Day


Bahamas Independence Day

The Bahama Islands gained independence from Great Britain at 12:01 a.m. on this day in 1973. The islands had been a British colony for nearly 250 years, but are now a commonwealth, with their own prime minister and parliament. Businesses are closed on the tenth, a legal holiday, but festivities go on for a week with parades and celebrations. A fireworks display at Clifford Park in Nassau on July 10 tops off the celebrations. More… Discuss

this day in the yersteryear: The Bahamas Gain Independence from the British Commonwealth (1973)


 

The Bahamas Gain Independence from the British Commonwealth (1973)

 

English: Reception of the American Loyalists b...

English: Reception of the American Loyalists by Great Britain in the Year 1783. Engraving by H. Moses after Benjamin West. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Bahama Islands became a British colony in the 18th century, when they were a haven for pirates such as Blackbeard. After the American Revolution, many Loyalists settled there, bringing slaves to labor on cotton plantations. Later, during the prohibition era in the US, the Bahamas became a base for rum-running. It was not until 1973 that the islands became a sovereign state within the Commonwealth of Nations. What happened to the native tribe that Columbus first encountered there in 1492? More… Discuss

 

Caribbean Coral Reefs Suffering Dramatic Decline


Caribbean Coral Reefs Suffering Dramatic Decline

If scuba diving in the Caribbean is on your bucket list, you may want to make it happen sooner rather than later. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) says many of the Caribbean’s coral reefs are in decline and could vanish in the next 20 years. Data suggest that Caribbean coral habitats have declined by more than 50 percent since the 1970s and that this trend will continue if action is not taken to protect these beautiful marine ecosystems. More… Discuss

Saint of the Day July 3, 2014: St. Thomas


Saint of the Day

Mosquito-Borne Virus Spreads to Caribbean and US


Mosquito-Borne Virus Spreads to Caribbean and US

Chikungunya, a debilitating, mosquito-borne viral disease that causes fever and potentially long-term joint pain, has long troubled Africa and Asia, but it is now rapidly spreading to other parts of the globe. It was first detected in the Caribbean in December, and there have since been nearly 5,000 confirmed cases and more than 160,000 suspected cases in the region. There have also been 57 infections reported in the US this year, and though all were thus far acquired outside the US, experts believe it is only a matter of time before it spreads throughout the Americas. More… Discuss

this pressed: National Geographic Magazine: Sugar (an industry once run with slave labor… now enslaving through addiction everyone globally!)


Picture of sugar being sprinkled on a donut

Sugar : We were smitten 10,000 years ago on the island of New Guinea. Today the average American downs 22.7 teaspoons a day.

this day in the yesteryear: Earthquake Devastates Port Royal, Jamaica (1692)


Earthquake Devastates Port Royal, Jamaica (1692)

In the 17th century, Port Royal was the capital of Jamaica and a popular destination for pirates to store and spend their treasure, earning the city a seedy reputation. On June 7, 1692, a devastating earthquake and subsequent tsunami hit the city, causing a large portion of it to sink into the Caribbean Sea. Between 1,000 and 3,000 people—a significant percentage of the city’s population—were killed in the disaster. What nickname have archaeologists since given the city? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: BRIXTON RIOT (1981)


Brixton Riot (1981)

In the early 1980s, south London‘s Brixton neighborhood was plagued by severe social and economic problems, including high rates of unemployment and crime and poor housing conditions. In 1981, in an effort to reduce street crime, police began stopping and searching anyone they deemed suspicious—a policy that many residents of the predominantly black community found discriminatory and heavy-handed. Eventually, the angry residents rioted. How many people were injured during the clash? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: SPIRITUAL BAPTIST LIBERATION DAY


Spiritual Baptist Liberation Day

This national holiday, instituted in 1996, honors an African-American religious sect once outlawed in Trinidad and Tobago. The Spiritual Baptists originally came to the islands as former American slaves. Their style of worship combines African and Baptist beliefs and practices, and services include bell ringing and shouting. In 1917, the government forbade the group from practicing their religion; this law was overturned in 1951. Their national holiday honors the Spiritual Baptists’ long struggle against religious persecution. It is observed with speeches and religious services. More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES NATIONAL HEROES DAY


St. Vincent and the Grenadines National Heroes Day

St. Vincent and the Grenadines is a nation comprised of a group of more than 30 islands in the Caribbean Sea, with St. Vincent being the largest. March 14 is National Heroes Day, when citizens honor their national hero, Chief Joseph Chatoyer. He led the nation in preventing the Europeans from colonizing the islands. On March 14, 1795, Chatoyer was killed by British troops at Dorsetshire Hill. A monument honoring Chatoyer stands on this spot; as part of the Heroes Day celebration, a wreath-laying ceremony is held at theobelisk at Dorsetshire Hill. More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: FEAST OF OUR LADY OF ALTAGRACIA


Feast of Our Lady of Altagracia

A cloth painting of the Virgin Mary is the focus of a yearly celebration in the Dominican Republic. It was painted by a Spanish artist and brought to the Dominican Republic in the early 1500s. The portrait, which was crowned by a gold and silver tiara by Pope John Paul II in 1978, is located in a basilica in the city of Higuey, in the province of Altagracia. Every year on January 21, thousands of pilgrims visit the Higuey cathedral to worship. The feast day is a national holiday and is marked by all-night church services, singing, dancing, and festivals. More… Discuss

 

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Today’s Holiday: HAITI ANCESTORS’ DAY


Haiti Ancestors’ Day

In Haiti, the Independence Day festivities that occur on the first day of the year continue into the second with Jour des Aieux (Ancestors’ Day), an occasion for remembering the founders of Haiti and those who sacrificed their lives during the revolution of the early 19th century. A large meal often accompanies the day’s festivities, and military processions may also take place on Ancestors’ Day. In years past, particularly during the reign of President François Duvalier (1971–1986), the executive leader used this day to broadcast speeches to the nation. More…Discuss

 

The Doors – Roadhouse Blues, BEST version (live in N.Y. 1970)



Hi, how you doin’ there? Y-e-ah. Looking good. Everything is fucked up as usual… you know…

WHOOOOOAAAAAAOOOO – C´MON!
A-keep your eyes on the road, your hands upon the wheel
A-keep your eyes on the road, your hands upon the wheel
Come to the Roadhouse, gonna have a real, a good time.

Yeah, at the back of the Roadhouse they got some bungalows.
Ah, at the back of the Roadhouse they got some bungalows.
That’s for the people… like to go down slow.

Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll — all night long.

Ashen lady, Ashen lady,
Give up your vows,
Give up your vows.
Save our city, save our city
Right now!

Yeah, I woke up this morning, I got myself a beer.
Well, I woke up this morning, I got myself a beer.
Future’s uncertain and the end is always near.

Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll — all night long.

 

Article: THE LLIBRE VERMELL DE MONTSERRAT


The Llibre Vermell de Montserrat

On a narrow terrace more than halfway up the precipitous cliffs of Montserrat in Spain is a Benedictine monastery that houses a library. Perhaps its most precious item is the Llibre Vermell de Montserrat, or Red Book of Montserrat, a manuscript containing devotional songs by unknown composers. Filled with songs for pilgrims, the manuscript was completed around 1399 and once contained 172 double pages, but more than 30 have been lost. Why does the manuscript have “red” in the title?More…

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS FIRST SIGHTS THE CARIBBEAN ISLAND OF DOMINICA (1493)


Christopher Columbus First Sights the Caribbean Island of Dominica (1493)

On the first Sunday in November 1493, Christopher Columbus spotted a mountainous island between Martinique and Guadeloupe in the Caribbean Sea. Ignoring the fact that its Carib inhabitants already had a name for the island, Columbus renamed it Dominica, the Latin name for the day of the week on which he spotted it. The Caribs managed to resist Spanish efforts to colonize the island but were unable to fend off the British and French. When did Dominica finally gain its independence? More…Discuss

 

HAITIANS SUE UN IN US COURT OVER CHOLERA OUTBREAK


Haitians Sue UN in US Court over Cholera Outbreak

Victims of a cholera outbreak in Haiti that has killed more than 8,300 people and sickened more than 650,000 since late 2010 have filed a multibillion-dollar lawsuit against the UN in US court. Though a UN-appointed panel concluded that it could not definitively identify the epidemic‘s source, an American investigation found strong evidence to suggest that UN peacekeepers from Nepal, where the disease is endemic, touched off the epidemic in Haiti by dumping raw sewage near a river used for drinking water. Earlier this year, the UN formally rejected victims’ requests for compensation, prompting them to take legal actionMore… Discuss