Tag Archives: Cat Stevens

just a thought: “Makers of life: No one loved feels wrong to the world…”


just a thought: “Makers of life: No one loved feels wrong to the world, but every unloved one is wronged.”
– George-B.

Copyright © 2015 [George-B-EUZICASA]. All Rights Reserved.

CAT STEVENS – THE BOY WITH A MOON AND STAR ON HIS HEAD LYRICS

 

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Cat Stevens – Peace Train (live): All together now!


Morning Has Broken: Cat Stevens


The hymn originally appeared in the second edition of Songs of Praise (published in 1931), to the tune “Bunessan“, composed in the Scottish Highlands. In Songs of Praise Discussed, the editor, Percy Dearmer, explains that as there was need for a hymn to give thanks for each day, English poet and children’s author Eleanor Farjeon had been “asked to make a poem to fit the lovely Scottish tune”. A slight variation on the original hymn, also written by Eleanor Farjeon, can be found in the form of a poem contributed to the anthology Children’s Bells, under Farjeon’s new title, “A Morning Song (For the First Day of Spring)”, published by Oxford University Press in 1957.

“Bunessan” had been found in L. McBean’s Songs and Hymns of the Gael, published in 1900.[3] Before Farjeon’s words, the tune was used as a Christmas carol, which began “Child in the manger, Infant of Mary”, translated from the Scottish Gaelic lyrics written by Mary MacDonald. The English-language Roman Catholic hymnal also uses the tune for the Charles Stanford hymns “Christ Be Beside Me” and “This Day God Gives Me”, both of which were adapted from the traditional Irish hymn St. Patrick’s Breastplate.

Writing credit for “Morning Has Broken” has occasionally been erroneously attributed to Cat Stevens, who popularised the song abroad. The familiar piano arrangement on Stevens’ recording was performed by Rick Wakeman, a classically trained keyboardist best known for his tenures in the English progressive rock band Yes.

Cat Stevens: Sad Lisa


Tea for the Tillerman

Image via Wikipedia

 Tea for the Tillerman is an album by singer-songwriter Cat Stevens. This album, Stevens’ second during 1970, includes many of Stevens’ best-known songs including “Where Do the Children Play?“, “Hard Headed Woman“, “Wild World“, “Sad Lisa”, “Into White” and “Father and Son“. Four of the tracks (“Where Do the Children Play?“, “On the Road to Find Out”, “Tea for the Tillerman” and “Miles from Nowhere”) were featured in the Hal Ashby and Colin Higginsblack comedy film entitled Harold and Maude, in 1971. The track “But I Might Die Tonight” was featured on another 1971 film: Deep End by Jerzy Skolimowski. Stevens, a former art student, created the artwork featured on the record’s cover.