Tag Archives: Cello Concerto

Leopold Hofmann – Cello Concerto in D major, Badley D3


Leopold Hofmann – Cello Concerto in D major, Badley D3

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Cello Concerto in B flat Major, G.482 – I. Allegro moderato


Cello Concerto in B flat Major, G.482 – I. Allegro moderato

Richard Strauss – Der Rosenkavalier – Waltz Sequence No. 1: make music part of your life series


Richard StraussDer Rosenkavalier – Waltz Sequence No. 1

Luigi Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.5 D major. G 478: great compositions/performances


Luigi Boccherini – Concerto for Violoncello and Orchestra No. 9, G. 482

 

L. Boccherini – Complete Cello Concertos, Julius Berger: great compositions/performances


L. Boccherini – Complete Cello Concertos, Julius Berger

Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476): make music part of your life series


Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476)

Saint-Saëns Cello Concerto 1 & 2, Suite for Cello & Orchestra Op.16, and other works – S. Isserlis: make music part of your life series


Saint-Saëns Cello Concerto 1 & 2, Suite for Cello & Orchestra Op.16, and other works – S. Isserlis

Jacqueline du Pre – Lalo cello concerto – part 1 (playlist of 4 videos): great compositions/performances


Jacqueline du Pre – Lalo cello concerto – part 1 (playlist of 4 videos)

Capella Savaria Joseph Haydn:Fortepiano Concerto No.11 in D major Hob XVIII:11 3. Rondo allUngarese: make music part of your life series


Capella Savaria Joseph Haydn:Fortepiano Concerto No.11 in D major Hob XVIII:11 3. Rondo allUngarese

make music part of your life series: Antonin Dvorak – Romance in F minor Op 11 – Violin and piano


[youtube.com/watch?v=T0Fv9jKeKX8]

Antonin Dvorak – Romance in F minor Op 11 – Violin and piano

Dvorak museum, Prague

Dvorak museum, Prague (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Antonin Dvorak – Czech Composer, born September 8, 1841 and died 1 May 1904.

make music part of your life series: Leopold Hofmann – Cello Concerto in D major, Badley D3


 

 

 

[youtube.com/watch?v=k40AA_jiTmE]

 

Leopold HofmannCello Concerto in D major, Badley D3

 

Tim Hugh (cello)
Northern Sinfonia
Leopold Hofmann – Cello Concerto in D major, Badley D3
I. Allegro moderato
II. Adagio un poco andante
III. Allegro molto

 

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonin Dvorak – Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)


[youtube.com/watch?v=qP-ymoLlKMY]

Antonin Dvorak – Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)

Antonín Leopold Dvořák (September 8, 1841 — May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer. Following the nationalist example of Bedřich Smetana, Dvořák frequently employed features of the folk musics of Moravia and his native Bohemia (then parts of the Austrian Empire and now constituting the Czech Republic). Dvořák’s own style has been described as ‘the fullest recreation of a national idiom with that of the symphonic tradition, absorbing folk influences and finding effective ways of using them.’

Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)

1. Allegro agitato
2. Andante sostenuto (18:09)
3. Allegro con fuoco (26:21)

Rudolf Firkušný, piano and the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra conducted by Walter Susskind.

The Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in G minor, Op. 33, was the first of three concertos that Antonín Dvořák completed—it was followed by a violin concerto and then a cello concerto—and the piano concerto is probably the least known and least performed.

As the eminent music critic Harold Schonberg put it, Dvořák wrote “an attractive Piano Concerto in G minor with a rather ineffective piano part, a beautiful Violin Concerto in A minor, and a supreme Cello Concerto in B minor“.

(bartje11 totally disagrees with the eminent Harold Schonberg)

Dvořák composed his piano concerto from late August through 14 September 1876. Its autograph version contains many corrections, erasures, cuts and additions, the bulk of which were made in the piano part. The work was premiered in Prague on 24 March 1878, with the orchestra of the Prague Provisional Theatre conducted by Adolf Cech with the Czech pianist Karel Slavkovsky.

Dvořák himself realized that he had not created a piece in which the piano does battle with the orchestra, as it is not a virtuosic piece. As Dvořák wrote: “I see I am unable to write a Concerto for a virtuoso; I must think of other things.”
(bartje11: maybe not a work with obvious virtuoso fireworks, but still a very, very difficult piano part, not for the average pianist)

What Dvořák composed, instead, was a symphonic concerto in which the piano plays a leading part in the orchestra, rather than opposed to it.

In an effort to mitigate awkward passages and expand the pianist’s range of sonorities, the Czech pianist and pedagogue Vilém Kurz undertook an extensive re-writing of the solo part; the Kurz revision is frequently performed today.

The concerto was championed for many years by the noted Czech pianist Rudolf Firkušný, who played it with many different conductors and orchestras around the world before his death in 1994. Once a student of Kurz, Firkušný performed the revised solo part for much of his life, turning towards the original Dvořák score later on in his concert career.

Arranger:
Robert Keller (1828-1891)

Publisher Info.:
Breslau: J. Hainauer, n.d.(ca.1883). Plates J. 2579, 2581 H.

Copyright:
Public Domain

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HISTORIC PERFORMANCES: Saint-Saens Cello Concerto No.1 Op.33 In A Minor – Jacqueline Du pré


[youtube.com/watch?v=DZCPV9Q9Fz4]

 

Camille Saint-Saëns composed his Cello Concerto No. 1 in A minor, Op. 33 in 1872, when the composer was 37 years old. He wrote this work for the Belgian cellist, viola de gamba player and instrument maker Auguste Tolbecque. Tolbecque was part of a distinguished family of musicians closely associated with the Société des Concerts du Conservatoire, France’s leading concert society. The concerto was first performed on January 19, 1873 at a conservatoire concert with Tolbecque as soloist. This was considered a mark of Saint-Saëns’ growing acceptance by the French musical establishment.

Sir Donald Francis Tovey later wrote “Here, for once, is a violoncello concerto in which the solo instrument displays every register without the slightest difficulty in penetrating the orchestra.” Many composers, including Shostakovich and Rachmaninoff, considered this concerto to be the greatest of all cello concertos.

The work can be split into three different sections as follows:

  1. Allegro non troppo
    The concerto begins unusually. Instead of the traditional orchestral introduction, the piece begins with one short chord from the orchestra. The cello follows, stating the main motif. Soon, countermelodies flow from both the orchestra and soloist, at times the two playfully “calling and answering” each other.
  2. Allegretto con moto
    This turbulent opening movement leads into a brief but highly original minuet, in which the strings are muted, and which contains a cello cadenza.
  3. Tempo primo
    A restatement of the opening material from the first movement opens the finale. While Saint-Saëns uses the finale mainly as a recapitulation of earlier material, he concludes it with the introduction of an entirely new idea for the cello.

Saint-Saëns very often uses the solo cello here as a declamatory instrument. This keeps the soloist in the dramatic and musical foreground, the orchestra offering a shimmering backdrop. The music is tremendously demanding for soloists, especially in the fast third section. This difficulty has not stopped the concerto from becoming a favourite of the great virtuoso cellists.

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Historic Performances: Jacqueline du Pre plays Elgar Cello Concerto BBCSO Barbirolli (1967 Live Stereo)


[youtube.com/watch?v=1LULTpqHNU8]

Jacqueline du Pre plays Elgar Cello Concerto BBCSO Barbirolli (1967 Live Stereo)

Sir Edward Elgar
Cello Concerto in E minor Op 85

Jacqueline du Pre
BBC Symphony Orchestra
Sir John Barbirolli

00:00 Adagio – Moderato
07:48 Lento – Allegro molto
12:18 Adagio
17:40 Allegro – Moderato – Allegro, ma non troppo – Poco più lento – Adagio.

(Live Recording: 3 Jan 1967 in Prague)

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Great Composers/Compositions: Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich



Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 “Rhenish” in E flat major, Op. 97 is the last of Robert Schumann‘s (1810-1856) symphonies to be composed, although not the last published. It was composed from November 2 to December 9, 1850, and comprises five movements:

  1. Lebhaft (Lively)
  2. Scherzo: Sehr mäßig (Scherzo) (in C major)
  3. Nicht schnell (not fast) (in A-flat major)
  4. Feierlich (Solemn) (in E-flat minor)
  5. Lebhaft (Lively)

The Third Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets in B♭, two bassoons, four french horns in E♭, two trumpets in E♭, threetrombonestimpani and strings. Its premiere on February 6, 1851 in Düsseldorf, conducted by Schumann himself,[1] was received with mixed reviews, “ranging from praise without qualification to bewilderment”. However according to Peter A. Brown, members of the audience applauded between every movement, and especially at the end of the work when the orchestra joined them in congratulating Schumann by shouting “hurrah!”.[2]

Biographical context

Throughout his life, Schumann explored a diversity of musical genres, including chambervocal, and symphonic music. Although Schumann wrote an incomplete G minor symphony as early as 1832-33 (of which the first movement was performed on two occasions to an unenthusiastic reception),[3]he only began seriously composing for the symphonic genre after receiving his wife’s encouragement in 1839.[4] Schumann gained quick success as a symphonic composer following his orchestral debut with his warmly-received First Symphony, which was composed in 1841 and premiered in Leipzig with Felix Mendelssohn conducting. By the end of his career Schumann had composed a total of four symphonies. Also in 1841 he finished the work which was later to be published as his Fourth Symphony. In 1845 he composed his C major Symphony, which was published in 1846 asNo. 2, and, in 1850, his Third Symphony. Therefore, the published numbering of the symphonies is not chronological. The reasoning for the “incorrect” numerical sequencing of the symphonies is because his Fourth Symphony was originally completed in 1841, but it was not well received at its Leipzig premiere. The lukewarm reception caused Schumann to withdraw the score and revise it ten years later in Düsseldorf. This final version was published in 1851 after the “Rhenish” Symphony was published

Genesis

The same year that Schumann composed his Third Symphony, he completed his Cello Concerto op. 129 which was published four years later. Schumann was inspired to write this symphony after a trip to the Rhineland with his wife. This journey was a happy and peaceful trip with Clara which felt to them as if they were on a pilgrimage.[5] As a result of this trip, he incorporated elements of his journey and portrayed other experiences from his life in the music. The key of the symphony has been connected to Bach’s idea of E flat major and the Holy Trinity.[6]

 

 

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Robert Schumann: Cello Concerto op.129 – Mario Brunello



Mario Brunello plays the Schumann‘s Cello Concerto op.129
Umberto Benedetti Michelangeli conducts the Rai National Symphony Orchestra (Orchestra Sinfonica Nazionale della Rai)
Turin, 1996

 

Jacqueline du Pré “Cello Concerto ” Dvorak (1. Mov.)



Cello Concerto in B minor op. 104 
by Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904)
1. Movement “Allegro
Jacqueline du Pré, cello
Radio Symphony Orchestra Stockholm
Sergiu Celebidache, conductor
26.XI.1967

 

Antonín Dvořák – Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, B. 191



Antonín DvořákCello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, B. 191 Complete All
The Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104, B. 191, by Antonín Dvořák was the composer’s last solo concerto, and was written in 1894–1895 for his friend, the cellist Hanuš Wihan, but premiered by the English cellist Leo Stern
Structure
The piece is scored for a full romantic orchestra (with the exception of a 4th horn) containing two flutes (second doubling piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, three horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, triangle (last movement only), and strings, and is in the standard three-movement concerto format:
Allegro (B minor then B major)
Adagio, ma non troppo (G major)
Finale: Allegro moderato — Andante — Allegro vivo (B minor then B major)

 

Carulli – Concerto in E minor, Op 140, I – Allegro ‘guitar & orchestra’


 

Slavonic Dance No. 2, Op. 46 Antonin Dvorak (and the Lesser Traveled Road…A perfect marriage!)


"Lesser Traveled Road'-oil painting (my Art Collection)

“Lesser Traveled Road’-oil painting (my Art Collection)


This song is performed by the “Berlin Festival Orchestra”, and Composed by Antonin Dvorak. He was a Czech composer of Romantic music, who employed the idioms of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia. His works include operas, symphonic, choral and chamber music. His best-known works include his New World Symphony, the Slavonic Dances, “American” String Quartet, and Cello Concerto in B minor.

Dvorak was commissioned by the publisher Simrock to compose a sequel to the Brahms “Hungarian Dances“, since that collection had put a considerable chunk of change into his pocket, and he relished the idea of repeating the pleasurable experience with the less expensive composer.