Tag Archives: César Franck

CÉSAR FRANCK: Symphonic Variations


CÉSAR FRANCK: Symphonic Variations

Camille Saint-Saëns – Africa, Op. 89, in G minor – Fantasy for Piano and Orchestra: great composirtions/performances


Saint-Saëns Camille
[Charles Camille]
1835-1921

Camille Saint-Saëns – Africa, Op. 89, in G minor – Fantasy for Piano and Orchestra

GREAT PERFORMANCES: Emil Gilels “Symphonic Variations” by C. Franck



Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra
by César Franck
Emil Gilels, piano
Radio Symphony Orchestra of the USSR
Karl Eliasberg, conductor
04.III.1951
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphonic Variations (Variations symphoniques), M. 46, is a work for piano and orchestra written in 1885 by César Franck. It has been described as “one of Franck’s tightest and most finished works”,[1] “a superb blending of piano and orchestra”,[2] and “a flawless work and as near perfection as a human composer can hope to get in a work of this nature”.[3] It is a fine example of Franck’s use of cyclic unity, with one theme growing into various others.[4] The piano and orchestra share equally in the continuous evolution of ideas.[3] The work is in F-sharp minor (with the last movement in F-sharp major). Duration in performance is about fifteen minutes, and the instrumentation is piano solo and orchestra: pairs of flutes, oboes, clarinets, and bassoons; four horns; two trumpets; timpani; and strings.[5]

The work was dedicated to Louis Diémer, who on 15 March 1885 had premiered Les Djinns – a symphonic poem for piano and orchestra that brought Franck one of his rare critical successes. He promised to reward Diémer with “a little something”, and the similarly scored Symphonic Variations was the result.[6] Franck started work in the summer of 1885, and completed the piece on 12 December.

In 1946 the choreographer Frederick Ashton used Franck’s work for a ballet, also called Symphonic Variations.

Ralph Vaughan Williams‘s Fantasia (quasi variazione) on the Old 104th Psalm Tune for piano, chorus, and orchestra (1949) has some similarities to the Symphonic variations, but it lacks Franck’s adherence to classical variation form.[10]

 

CESAR FRANCK: PSALM 150 – CONDUCTED BY TAMÁS VÁSÁRY, XAVER VARNUS AT THE GREAT ORGAN



Cesar Franck: Psalm 150 (O Praise God In His Holiness)

with the participation of
XAVER VARNUS on the great organ,
The Budapest Tomkins Vocal Ensemble, The Budapest Opera Orchestra

Conducted by TAMÁS VÁSÁRY
http://www.tamas-vasary.com/biography
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IgMSmr…

Taped in the Great Hall of Franz Liszt Academy of Music of Budapest

http://www.facebook.com/xavervarnus

 

César Franck: Panis Angelicus with Soprano Danee Robinson


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Panis angelicus is the penultimate strophe of the hymn Sacris solemniis written by Saint Thomas Aquinas for the Feast of Corpus Christi as part of a complete liturgy of the Feast including prayers for the Mass and the Liturgy of the Hours.

The strophe of Sacris solemniis that begins with the words “Panis angelicus” (bread of angels) has often been set to music separately from the rest of the hymn. Most famously, in 1872 César Franck set this strophe for voice (tenor), harp, cello, and organ, and incorporated it into his Messe à trois voix Opus 12. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panis_Angelicus)

I hope you too will enjoy Danee Robinson’s interpretation  of the sublime  hymn  ” Panis Angelicus.”  
 
Find out more about Danee’s,  recordings, musical career and  coming
recitals at her website:  http://daneerobinson.com/

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