Tag Archives: Chess

Mihail Sadoveanu citeşte din Mihai Eminescu:”Sara pe deal” (momente magice pe YouTube!)


Mihail Sadoveanu citeşte din Mihai Eminescu:”Sara pe deal”

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people and places: Wilhelm Steinitz


Wilhelm Steinitz

Steinitz was a pioneering modern chess player. After discovering a talent for chess while a student in Vienna, he devoted himself to the game and by 1866 was recognized as the world champion, although the title did not officially exist yet. His loss of the world championship in 1894 so disturbed him that he spent much of the rest of his life in mental institutions and died a pauper in 1900. Who took the title from Steinitz, and what did he say with regard to Steinitz and his unfortunate fate? More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: VERA MENCHIK (1906)


Vera Menchik (1906)

A Russian-born British international chess master, Menchik won seven consecutive Women’s World Chess Championships, beginning with the first one ever held and ending in 1939, when World War II halted the tournament. She and her family were killed in an air raid on London in 1944. When Menchik entered a men’s tournament in 1929, Viennese master Albert Becker ridiculed her by saying that anyone who lost to her should become a part of the “Vera Menchik Club.” Who was the first of its many members? More… Discuss

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) on Forethought and Instinct (see the difference?)


As a man without forethought scarcely deserves the name of a man, so forethought without reflection is but a metaphorical phrase for the instinct of a beast.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Discuss

My thought on this: Sometimes instinct brings about better outcomes, that forethought….otherwise, let’s say in chess, everybody would win all the time. Also when an instinct is more powerful than any forethought you may have tried…well, it’s OK the choose to guide yourself by… instinct!

Today’s Birthday: Paul Morphy (1837)


Paul Morphy (1837)

Morphy was an American chess player widely considered to have been the world’s greatest. He earned a law degree at 18 but was ineligible to practice until 21, so he turned to chess to pass the time. He won the American championship and then beat the European masters, making a name for himself as the unofficial world chess champion. After failing to set up a law practice, he went into seclusion and retired from competitive play. How many opponents could he play simultaneously while blindfolded? More… Discuss