Tag Archives: Chicago

Vatican Radio: Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe


Vatican Radio:  Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe

Vatican Radio: Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe (click to access site)

(Vatican Radio)  The annual meeting of the Eastern Catholic hierarchs  of Europe is taking place in Prague- Břevnov (Czech Republic), at the invitation of Mgr Ladislav Hučko, Apostolic Exarch for Byzantine Rite Catholics resident in the Czech Republic. The meeting will take place at the Benedictine Archabbey of St Adalbert and St Margaret (Břevnov).

In Břevnov, the bishops representing 14 Eastern Catholic Churches in Europe are discussing issues concerning the family in Europe and the role and mission of the Eastern Catholic Churches.  The discussions are taking place with a view, too, to the upcoming Ordinary Synod of Bishops on the Family this coming October. Participants at the meeting are examining two reports: one on The contemporary family in Europe by Deacon Jaroslav Max Kašparů, a well-known lecturer in the Czech Republic; and one on the “sacramental potential” of the family by Fr Volodymyr Los, a priest of the Greek-Catholic Church diocese of Buchach, Ukraine.

Mgr Ladislav Hučko was expected to illustrate the situation and mission of the Greek-Catholic Church in the Czech Republic.

The meeting will end on Sunday 7 June with the celebration of the Divine Liturgy along with the local community in the Greek-Catholic Cathedral of St Clement.

Participants at the meeting, organised by the Council of European Episcopal Conferences (CCEE), include Mgr Cyril Vasil’, Archbishop Secretary of the Congregation for the Oriental Churches, and Mgr Duarte da Cunha, CCEE General Secretary.

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great compositions/performances: Mahler: Pianokwartet in a kl.t. / Piano quartet in a minor


Mahler: Pianokwartet in a kl.t. / Piano quartet in a minor

historic musical Bits: Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto #2 in C Minor, Op. 18


Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto #2 in C Minor, Op. 18 – HD

today’s holiday: Festa di San Nicola


Festa di San Nicola

The Festa di San Nicola (Festival of St. Nicholas) is celebrated in Italy on the anniversary of the transfer of the saint’s relics by a group of 11th-century sailors from Bari. Thousands of pilgrims come to the Basilica of San Nicola in Bari, Puglia, to worship at the saint’s tomb and to ask for his help. There is a procession on this day in which a group of Barese sailors take the saint’s image down to the water, where it is placed on a flower-decked boat and taken out to sea. At night the statue is returned to its place of honor on the altar of San Nicola’s crypt. More… Discuss

Injured Worker in ProPublica/NPR Story Testifies Before Illinois Legislature – ProPublica


An injured worker featured in a ProPublica and NPR investigation into the rollback of workers’ compensation nationwide warned Illinois lawmakers on Tuesday not to make the same drastic cuts that his state has made in recent years.

John Coffell, who lost his home after hurting his back at an Oklahoma tire plant, testified as part of an eight-hour hearing on workers’ comp before the entire Illinois state assembly. The rare hearing of “the committee as a whole” was called by Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan as a preemptive strike of sorts as newly elected Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner prepares a number of changes to reduce costs for employers.

As part of his “turnaround agenda,” Rauner has proposed:

Toughening standards so that employees must prove that work caused more than 50 percent of their injuries rather than just aggravating an existing condition

Relying more heavily on disability rating guides that reduce compensation for workers who suffer permanent injuries

Allowing workers’ comp judges to give equal weight to opinions of doctors hired by insurance companies rather than giving deference to workers’ physicians

Reducing the maximum medical fees that doctors and hospitals can charge by 30 percent

ProPublica and NPR reported earlier this year that more than 30 states have changed their workers’ comp laws since 2003, largely to appeal more to business. Those changes — which mirror some proposed in Illinois — have reduced benefits for injured workers, created hurdles to medical care, or made it more difficult for workers to qualify.

As in many states, workers’ comp in Illinois has become a bargaining chip. Rauner has insisted that changes to the laws must be made in exchange for any increase in the state’s minimum wage.

During the hearing, Rep. Jay Hoffman, a Democrat from southwestern Illinois, said the assembly should learn from the experiences of workers like Coffell, who were victims of both tragic accidents and “short-sighted policies” enacted by their legislatures.

“Their representatives may have called these actions ‘reforms.’ They may have talked about the business climate. They may have talked about the need to root out fraud. But what they really did is they denied hard-working, middle-class families the care they need and the support they deserve,” Hoffman said. “This side of the aisle will not join other states in a race to the bottom.”

The ProPublica and NPR series has led to bills to raise benefits in Alabama and prevent medical care from being cut off in California. Officials have also warned insurers in California not to abuse the process and have launched an audit of how one insurer handled a claim in which a paraplegic’s home health care was terminated. In Illinois, Coffell’s testimony appears to have been used to try to douse the governor’s proposals.

Coffell told the legislators that after injuring a disc in his back last summer, his pay dropped dramatically because Oklahoma had reduced the maximum wage-replacement benefits injured workers could receive from $801 a week to $561 a week.

Almost immediately, he said, his utilities were cut off, his truck was repossessed and his family was evicted from their rental home. Because no relative could accommodate all of them, Coffell sent his three children, aged 5 to 9, to live with grandparents. He and his wife only had enough gas money to see them on weekends. They’ve had to rely on food stamps to get by.

Asked by a legislator how it felt to not be able to support his family, Coffell said, “It’s indescribable, really. Pretty much if I was to give a crazy example, if you were to see your husband or child drowning in a pool, but not being able to get them out of it. Kind of the same feeling.”

The hearing repeatedly drew comparisons between Illinois, which has relatively high benefits and costs, and Indiana, which has relatively low benefits and the second cheapest insurance rates for employers in the country.

Workers and their families praised Illinois’ law. Christine Fuller — who lived in Indiana, but whose father died from falling off a roof on a job in Illinois — said the survivor benefits she received from workers’ comp helped pay the mortgage and put her through college and graduate school.

via Injured Worker in ProPublica/NPR Story Testifies Before Illinois Legislature – ProPublica.

Pope John Paul II Visits Mosque (2001)


Pope John Paul II Visits Mosque (2001)

When Pope John Paul II visited Syria’s Umayyad Mosque, where the head of John the Baptist—a holy figure in both Christianity and Islam—is said to be interred, he became the first Catholic Pope to enter and pray in an Islamic mosque. The address he delivered there, promoting peace between Muslims and Christians, reflected his ongoing ecumenical efforts, which included meeting with religious leaders from other faiths and denominations. While in Syria, the pope aroused controversy by kissing what? More… Discuss

Maurice Ravel – Valses nobles et sentimentales (Fritz Reiner, Chicago Symphony Orchestra)


Maurice Ravel – Valses nobles et sentimentales (Fritz Reiner, Chicago Symphony Orchestra)

This day in the yesteryear: St. Valentine’s Day Massacre (1929)


St. Valentine’s Day Massacre (1929)

When Jack McGurn, a member of Al Capone’s gang, was almost killed by members of rival George “Bugs” Moran’s gang, Capone decided to retaliate by luring Bugs and some of his men to a warehouse and killing them. On the day of the massacre, Capone’s men thought that the rival crime boss had entered the warehouse and opened fire. They killed seven men but not Bugs—he had grown suspicious and changed his plans. One of the seven victims initially survived, despite how many gunshot wounds? More… Discuss

Claude Debussy – Iberia [Fritz Reiner, Chicago Symphony Orchestra]


Claude Debussy – Iberia [Fritz Reiner, Chicago Symphony Orchestra]

Published on Jun 18, 2014

Legendary conductor Fritz Reiner established his legacy when he assumed his directorship of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Reiner raised the status of the CSO that of one of the finest in the world. Although not often associated with the works of the French Impressionist composers, these performances from 1958 are considered among the finest from the Reiner/CSO era! Recorded on March 4, April 13 and April 15, 1957 at Orchestra Hall, Chicago. Musicians: Chicago Symphony Orchestra Fritz Reiner, conductor

 

Mozart – Alla Turca – Turkish March (60 Minutes Version)


Mozart – Alla Turca – Turkish March (60 Minutes Version)

Published on Jul 17, 2014/214,439

Rondo Alla Turca by Mozart in a 60 minutes rendition from a very rare LP recording featuring piano and orchestra with a repetition of the piece for more than 10 times. This version of the Alla Turca, also known as the Turkish March is the only one accompanied by a symphony orchestra with a more soothing and deep sound of this true master piece by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

The melodic lines in the orchestra are more in the style of Beethoven & Tchaikovsky than Mozart, and remind a little bit of the James Bond Theme, but the concept of the piece is originally followed. Let’s say that this is a modern version of the Turkish March enhanced with the rich orchestral sound.

Enjoy and relax while listening to this really long and calming version of Rondo alla Turca, which can be used for various occasions like music for healing, reading, homework, learning, relaxing, stress relief and even for a musical ambiance if you have some guests at home and when doing any other useful things as well.

Thanks for watching Alla turca by Mozart and if you like it, please subscribe to this channel, for more innovative & enjoyable music like this to come soon!

Tags: Mozart, Turkish March, Alla Turca, Rondo, Original, Long version, 60 minutes, Wolfgang, Amadeus, Austria, Salzburg, Piano, Orchestra, Piano Sonata No. 11, Relaxing, Stress relief, famous, classical music, concentration, learning, study, zen, music for healing, reading, Моцарт, Турецкий марш, Türkische Marsch, Marsz Turecki, Türk Marşı

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 2

962   Otto I invades Italy and is crowned Holy Roman Emperor.
1032   Conrad II claims the throne of France.
1494   Columbus begins the practice using Indians as slaves.
1571   All eight members of a Jesuit mission in Virginia are murdered by Indians who pretended to be their friends.
1626   Charles I is crowned King of England. Fierce internal struggles between the monarchy and Parliament characterized 17th century English politics.
1848   The Treaty of Guadeloupe Hidalgo formally ends the Mexican War.
1865   Confederate raider William Quantrill and his bushwackers rob citizens, burn a railroad depot and steal horses from Midway, Kentucky.
1870   The press agencies Havas, Reuter and Wolff sign an agreement whereby between them they can cover the whole world.
1876   The National Baseball League is founded with eight teams.
1900   Six cities, Boston, Detroit, Milwaukee, Baltimore, Chicago and St. Louis agree to form baseball’s American League.
1901   Mexican government troops are badly beaten by Yaqui Indians.
1916   U.S. Senate votes independence for Philippines, effective in 1921.
1921   Airmail service opens between New York and San Francisco. Airmail’s First Day.
1934   Alfred Rosenberg is made philosophical chief of the Nazi Party.
1939   Hungary breaks relations with the Soviet Union.
1943   Last of the German strongholds at Stalingrad surrender to the Red army.
1944   The Germans stop an Allied attack at Anzio, Italy.
1945   Some 1,200 Royal Air Force planes blast Wiesbaden and Karlsruhe.
1948   The United States and Italy sign a pact of friendship, commerce and navigation.
1959   Arlington and Norfolk, Va., peacefully desegregate public schools.
1960   The U.S. Senate approves 23rd Amendment calling for a ban on the poll tax.
1972   The Winter Olympics begin in Sapporo, Japan.
1978   U.S. Jewish leaders bar a meeting with Egypt’s Anwar Sadat.
1987   Largest steel strike in American history, in progress since August, ends.
Born on February 2
1754   Charles Maurice de Tallyrand-Perigord, minister of foreign affairs for Napoleon I, who represented France brilliantly at the Congress of Vienna.
1882   James Joyce, Irish novelist and poet (Ulysses, Portrait of a Young Man).
1890   Charles Correl, radio performer.
1895   George Halas, National Football League co-founder.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.IrmCKXD6.dpuf

California missions – Los Angeles Times


California’s famed 21 missions were all built to be exactly a day’s journey apart.  

via California missions – Los Angeles Times.

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***Additional images (not from The LA Times), from internet research (Yahoo)

click to enlarge

 

California Mission Monterey (click to enlarge)

 

 

A picture that shook the world. Read the #story and share it — Daniel Gennaoui (@DanielGennaoui)


German soldiers being shown what their government had done after the war.— Daniel Gennaoui (@DanielGennaoui)


 

this pressed for your knowledge: Uber’s car-financing program sets up drivers to lie to the DMV in Calif — Ellen Huet (@ellenhuet)


word: wizened


wizened

Definition: (adjective) Lean and wrinkled by shrinkage as from age or illness.
Synonyms: shrunken, withered, shriveled
Usage: The wizened face of the man of law was twisted into a wrinkled smile. Discuss.

Tchaikovsky – Suite No. 4 in G major “Mozartiana”, Op. 61: great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky – Suite No. 4 in G major “Mozartiana“, Op. 61

#TweetingAllAbout


#TweetingAllAbout

#TweetingAllAbout

Maurice Ravel – Valses nobles et sentimentales (Fritz Reiner, Chicago Symphony Orchestra): make music part of your life series


this day in history: John Dillinger Killed by the FBI (1934)


John Dillinger Killed by the FBI (1934)

During a nine-year stint in Indiana state prisons for a 1924 holdup, Dillinger learned the craft of bank robbery from his fellow inmates. After being paroled in 1933, he went on to commit five bank robberies in four months. Captured by police yet again, Dillinger escaped jail twice and was named “public enemy number one” by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). His run came to an end when FBI agents shot him to death outside a Chicago theater. Who lured Dillinger to the ambush site? More… Discuss

Sjomannadagurtoday’s holiday:


Sjomannadagur

Sjomannadagur is a day honoring the role that fishing and fishermen have played in Icelandic history, celebrated in the coastal towns and cities of Iceland. Sailors take the day off, and the Seaman’s Union sponsors many events, such as competitions in rowing and swimming, tugs-of-war and sea rescue competitions. Celebrations begin with a church service and a trip to the local cemetery to honor sailors lost at sea. Afterward there are children’s parades, dances, outdoor cookouts, and bonfires in the evening. The proceeds from the day’s events go to the national fund that supports old seamen’s homes. More… Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez


[youtube.com/watch?v=nZkgyIdXt44]

Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez

Debussy,
Printemps: Suite Symphonique
1. Tres Modere
2. Modere
Pierre Boulez

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Stravinsky Divertimento from “The Fairy’s Kiss” (Muti-Philadelphia Orch.)



Related articles

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: GEORGE FERRIS (1859)


George Ferris (1859)

American engineer George Ferris worked on a number of bridge projects in the 1880s and 90s, but he is best remembered today for his contribution to the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago—a huge revolving observation wheel. The “Ferris wheel” was designed to be an engineering marvel that would rival the Eiffel Tower, the icon of the 1889 Paris Exposition. A resounding success, it drew about 1.5 million riders over the course of the fair. How many could take a whirl on the wheel at once? More… Discuss

 

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Years Of Censoring `Oz’ – Chicago Tribune


The-Wonderful-Wizard-of-Oz

Years Of Censoring `Oz’ – Chicago Tribune.

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ARTICLE: THE LITTLE THEATER MOVEMENT


The Little Theater Movement

Sensational melodramas had been en vogue at the theater since the 19th century, but as film became the medium for large-scale spectacle, the Little Theater Movement developed in the US. Beginning in Chicago around 1912, theater enthusiasts banded together to produce more intimate, noncommercial, and reform-minded plays. The success of their Little Theater Movement likely helped to launch community theater and Off-Broadway plays. It also kick-started the career of what famous playwright? More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: ALPHONSE “AL” CAPONE (1899)


Alphonse “Al” Capone (1899)

Chicago in the 1920s was a city of vice, corruption, and murder, with gangster leader Capone at the forefront. During Prohibition, Capone operated and organized speakeasies, and his control soon extended to gambling, brothels, and politics. “Scarface” Capone had his rivals murdered, and he forcibly controlled election results throughout Chicago. At the peak of his power, he was arrested—ironically—for tax evasion. He served time in the new Alcatraz prison before being released for what reason? More…

 

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Fabulous Compositions/ Performances: Ludwig van Beethoven, Sesta Sinfonia Op. 68 in Fa maggiore, “Pastorale” (Beethoven’s Six Symphony in E major, Op. 68) – Riccardo Muti conducts the Filarmonica della Scala di Milano



Epoca: 1807 – 1808
Composizione:
ottavino, 2 flauti, 2 oboi, corno inglese, 2 clarinetti, 2 fagotti,
2 corni, 2 trombe, 2 tromboni, timpani, archi

Movimenti:
I Allegro ma non troppo 0:00
II Andante molto mosso 12:40
III Allegro 25:12
IV Allegro vivace 30:43
V Allegretto 34:37

Filarmonica della Scala di Milano
Direttore: RICCARDO MUTI

 

Riccardo Muti

Cover of Riccardo Muti

 

 

 

 

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THE IROQUOIS THEATER FIRE (1903)


The Iroquois Theater Fire (1903)

Billed as “absolutely fireproof,” Chicago’s Iroquois Theater was filled with mostly women and children—out of school for the holidays—for a matinée on December 30, 1903, when a curtain caught fire. One actor tried calming the audience, but panic spread. Many escape routes were unmarked, and a stampede ensued. As people fled, the cold air they let in fed the inferno. More than 575 people died—a death toll more than double that of the famed 1871 Chicago Fire. What show had packed the theater? More… Discuss

 

The Night Chicago Died



The Night Chicago Died

If you’d like to purchase a CD that includes this song please follow this link http://amzn.to/Mi1g9u 

Daddy was a cop On the east side of Chicago Back in the U S A Back in the bad old days
In the heat of a summer night In the land of the dollar bill When the town of Chicago died And they talk about it still
When a man named Al Capone Tried to make that town his own And he called his gang to war With the forces of the law
I heard my mama cry I heard her pray the night Chicago died Brother what a night it really was Brother what a fight it really was, glory be
I heard my mama cry I heard her pray the night Chicago died Brother what a night the people saw Brother what a fight the people saw, yes indeed
And the sound of the battle rang Through the streets of the old east side ‘Til the last of the hoodlum gang Had surrendered up or died
There was shouting in the street And the sound of running feet And I asked someone who said ‘Bout a hundred cops are dead
I heard my mama cry I heard her pray the night Chicago died Brother what a night it really was Brother what a fight it really was, glory be
I heard my mama cry I heard her pray the night Chicago died Brother what a night the people saw Brother what a fight the people saw, yes indeed
Then there was no sound at all But the clock upon the wall
Then the door burst open wide And my daddy stepped inside And he kissed my mama’s face And he brushed her tears away
The night Chicago died The night Chicago died Brother what a night the people saw Brother what a fight the people saw, yes indeed
The night Chicago died The night Chicago died Brother what a night it really was Brother what a fight it really was, glory be

 

Bartók: Hungarian Sketches (Reiner / Chicago Symphony)



Bartók: Hungarian Sketches
0:00 I. An Evening in the Village
2:45 II. Bear Dance
4:27 III. Melody
6:32 IV. Slightly Tipsy
8:51 V. Swineherd’s Dance
Reiner / Chicago Symphony

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: THE RUNNING OF THE FIRST CHICAGO MARATHON (1977)


The Running of the First Chicago Marathon (1977)

The largest marathon in the world at that time, the first running of the Mayor Daley Marathon—now the Bank of America Chicago Marathon—drew 4,200 participants. Since then it has grown both in size and prestige. The race is now capped at 45,000 runners and is considered one of the world’s most renowned marathons. The 30th anniversary running of the race was unique in several respects. For one thing, it featured a special CEO challenge, and for another, it was halted after just 3 ½ hours. Why? More…

 

Rie Sinclair Island of Loneliness



lia Efimovich Repin (1844-1930) 
Volga Boatmen (1870-1873)

 

Democracy Now: Update on “Occupy Wall Street” Movement


700 Arrested on Brooklyn Bridge as Occupy Wall Street Enters Third Week Protests Grows Nationwide

700 Arrested on Brooklyn Bridge as Occupy Wall Street Enters Third Week Protests Grows Nationwide (click on picture to access and read this story)

The “Occupy Wall Street” protests in the financial district took a dramatic turn on Saturday when protesters tried to march across the Brooklyn Bridge. When police arrested 700 of the demonstrators, the event quickly turned into one of the largest arrests of non-violent protesters in recent history. Some protesters claim police lured them onto oncoming traffic on the bridge’s roadway; others said they did not hear instructions from police telling them to use the pedestrian walkway. Meanwhile, similar “Occupation” protests have spread to other cities, including Chicago, Boston and Los Angeles, where hundreds of protesters are now camped out in front of City Hall. We host a roundtable discussion with Marisa Holmes, an organizer with the main organizing group of Occupy Wall Street, called the General Assembly, Marina Sitrin, an attorney who is part of Occupy Wall Street’s legal working group, and Laurie Penny, a writer and journalist who reported on protests in London earlier this summer [Transcript to come. Check back soon.]
(Source: http://www.democracynow.org/)

Today’s Quotation: L. Frank Baum (1856-1919)


I believe, my dears, that I am the proudest story-teller that ever lived…To have pleased you, to have interested you, to have won your friendship, and perhaps your love, through my stories, is to my mind as great an achievement as to become President of the United States.

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919) Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Louis Sullivan (1856)


Louis Sullivan (1856)

Sullivan is considered the father of modern American architecture. After working for several Chicago firms, he joined the office of Dankmar Adler in 1879, becoming Adler’s partner at age 24. Their 14-year association produced more than 100 buildings, many of them landmarks. During this period, Frank Lloyd Wright spent six years as an apprentice to Sullivan, who would be a major influence on the younger architect. What famous phrase did Sullivan coin to express his architectural philosophy? More… Discuss

Happy Birthday Louis: “LA Vie En Rose”


Louis Armstrong (1901)

(Video from: Сoncert of Louis Armstrong in Belgium 1959 backed by his stellar band the All-Stars, featuring Trummy Young, Peanuts Hucko, Billy Kyle, Danny Barcelona and Mort Herbert.)

Armstrong was an innovative trumpeter and singer who strongly influenced the melodic development of jazz in the 1920s. He began playing in marching, riverboat, and cabaret bands as a youth in New Orleans and later joined King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band in Chicago and the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra in New York City. Between 1925 and 1929, he made his classic Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings, which established the preeminence of the virtuoso jazz soloist. What style of singing did he popularize? More… DiscussArmstrong was an innovative trumpeter and singer who strongly influenced the melodic development of jazz in the 1920s. He began playing in marching, riverboat, and cabaret bands as a youth in New Orleans and later joined King Oliver‘s Creole Jazz Band in Chicago and the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra in New York City. Between 1925 and 1929, he made his classic Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings, which established the preeminence of the virtuoso jazz soloist. What style of singing did he popularize? More…

Louis Armstrong _ What a Wonderful World

Louis Armstrong _ What a Wonderful World

 

The Entertainer: Scott Joplin (Ragtime)


Scott Joplin (c. 1867 – April 1, 1917) was an American composer and pianist. He achieved fame for his unique ragtime compositions, and was dubbed the “King of Ragtime.” During his brief career, Joplin wrote 44 original ragtime pieces, one ragtime ballet, and two operas. One of his first pieces, the “Maple Leaf Rag“, became ragtime’s first and most influential hit, and has been recognized as the archetypal rag.

He was born into a musical African-American family of laborers in eastern Texas, and developed his musical knowledge with the help of local teachers. During the late 1880s he travelled around the American South as an itinerant musician, and went to Chicago for the World’s Fair of 1893 which played a major part in making ragtime a national craze by 1897.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Joplin)

Carl Sandberg: 1879-1967


Carl Sandburg (1878 – 1967)

Sea-Wash

by Carl Sandburg

The sea-wash never ends.

The sea-wash repeats, repeats.
Only old songs? Is that all the sea knows?
             Only the old strong songs?
             Is that all?
The sea-wash repeats, repeats.

 

Source: Poetry (February 1920).

First Source: Poetry (Poetry, 1920)

sea wash (Audio)

BIOGRAPHY

Carl Sandburg

“Trying to write briefly about Carl Sandburg,” said a friend of the poet, “is like trying to picture the Grand Canyon in one black and white snapshot.” His range of interests was enumerated by his close friend, Harry Golden, who, in his study of the poet, called Sandburg “the one American writer who distinguished himself in five fields—poetry, history, biography, fiction, and music.” Read more about Carl sandberg from:
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/carl-sandburg 

Today’s Birthday: Gloria Swanson (1899-1983) “I love you so much that I hate you”


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Swanson, Gloria

Swanson, Gloria, 1899–1983, American movie actress, b. Chicago. Swanson began her film career in 1913, displaying an elegant comedic style in a series of films for director Cecil B. DeMille. Financed by Joseph Kennedy, she produced her own films from 1920 until 1929, including Sadie Thompson (1928) and Queen Kelly (1928). Although she made an easy transition to sound movies, she retired in 1934. She made a celebrated return in Sunset Boulevard (1950), portraying an aging, half-mad, silent movie queen. She made only three more films, but enjoyed continued success on television. Swanson appeared on Broadway in a revival of Twentieth Century (1952) and in Butterflies Are Free (1971).