Tag Archives: Christ

The Eucharist teaches us to care for the weakest of society, Pope Francis says :: Catholic News (The Eucharist is a “school of charity and solidarity,” the Pope said. “Whoever is nourished by the Bread of Christ cannot remain indifferent to those who do not have bread daily.”)Agency (CNA)


Vatican City, Jun 7, 2015 / 08:29 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his Angelus address on Sunday, Pope Francis focused on the recent feast of Corpus Christi, saying the Eucharist is a “school of solidarity and charity,” which inspires us to care for the most vulnerable.

This feast, the Roman Pontiff said June 7 at St. Peter’s Square in the Vatican, “evokes this message of solidarity, and pushes us to welcome the intimate invitation to conversion and to service, to love and to forgiveness.”

In our daily lives, we encounter Christ, who nourishes us in the Eucharist, in the poor, the suffering, our brothers, and “in every human being, even the smallest and most defenseless.”

The roman Pontiff reflected on the feast’s Gospel, which recounts the institution of the Eucharist during Christ’s Last Supper before his crucifixion.

That night, Christ said that whoever eats his flesh and drinks his blood will “remain in me and I in him,” and will have eternal life.

“With this gesture and with these words, he gives bread a function that is no longer simply physical nourishment, but that which makes present his Person amid the community of believers.”

The Pope added that the Last Supper marks the end of Christ’s life, looking ahead to his death on the Cross, but also to the synthesis of “a life offered for the salvation of humanity.”

For this reason, it is not enough to affirm Christ’s presence in the Eucharist, the Pope said, but recognize it as “the presence of a life given, and take part.”

By receiving Christ in the Eucharist, taking part in his life and entering into communion with him, we in turn are called to promote unity among ourselves, transforming “our life into a gift,” especially to a poor.

The Eucharist is a “school of charity and solidarity,” the Pope said. “Whoever is nourished by the Bread of Christ cannot remain indifferent to those who do not have bread daily.”

Despite efforts by the international community, this is an increasing problem, and requires proposals to resolve its causes, he said.

The Pope concluded his address by invoking the intercession of Mary, that she may “awaken in everyone the joy in participating in the Mass, especially on Sunday, and the joyful courage to give witness to the charity of Christ.”

After leading the crowds in the recitation of the Angelus, Pope Francis spoke of his apostolic visit to Sarajevo the previous day.

Once described as the “Jerusalem of the West” owing to the coexistence of various peoples and religious, the recent past has made it into a “symbol of destruction and war,” he said.

Acknowledging the efforts toward reconciliation, Pope Francis encouraged “this journey toward of peaceful coexistence between diverse peoples; a hard, difficult, yet possible journey!”

Pope Francis’ visit on Saturday marked the twentieth anniversary of the signing of the signing of the Dayton Agreement which brought an end to the Bosnian War.

After the breakup of Yugoslavia, some 100,000 combatants and civilians were killed and a million more displaced during the war, which lasted between 1992-1995. The fighting split largely along ethnic lines, among the predominantly Orthodox Serbs, the predominantly Catholic Croats, and the predominantly Muslim Bosniaks.

“May the Lord bless Sarajevo, Bosnia, and Herzegovina.”

Tags: Corpus Christi

via The Eucharist teaches us to care for the weakest of society, Pope Francis says :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

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Vatican Radio: Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe


Vatican Radio:  Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe

Vatican Radio: Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe (click to access site)

(Vatican Radio)  The annual meeting of the Eastern Catholic hierarchs  of Europe is taking place in Prague- Břevnov (Czech Republic), at the invitation of Mgr Ladislav Hučko, Apostolic Exarch for Byzantine Rite Catholics resident in the Czech Republic. The meeting will take place at the Benedictine Archabbey of St Adalbert and St Margaret (Břevnov).

In Břevnov, the bishops representing 14 Eastern Catholic Churches in Europe are discussing issues concerning the family in Europe and the role and mission of the Eastern Catholic Churches.  The discussions are taking place with a view, too, to the upcoming Ordinary Synod of Bishops on the Family this coming October. Participants at the meeting are examining two reports: one on The contemporary family in Europe by Deacon Jaroslav Max Kašparů, a well-known lecturer in the Czech Republic; and one on the “sacramental potential” of the family by Fr Volodymyr Los, a priest of the Greek-Catholic Church diocese of Buchach, Ukraine.

Mgr Ladislav Hučko was expected to illustrate the situation and mission of the Greek-Catholic Church in the Czech Republic.

The meeting will end on Sunday 7 June with the celebration of the Divine Liturgy along with the local community in the Greek-Catholic Cathedral of St Clement.

Participants at the meeting, organised by the Council of European Episcopal Conferences (CCEE), include Mgr Cyril Vasil’, Archbishop Secretary of the Congregation for the Oriental Churches, and Mgr Duarte da Cunha, CCEE General Secretary.

NEWS.VA: Spiritual Reflection


 

 SPIRITUAL REFLECTION  “The Church moves forward like the advancing dawn”  From the Moral Reflections on Job by Saint Gregory the Great, pope (Lib. 29,2-4: PL 76, 478-480)  Since the daybreak or the dawn is changed gradually from darkness into light, the Church, which comprises the elect, is fittingly styled daybreak or dawn. […]  This reference to the dawn conjures up a still more subtle consideration. The dawn intimates that the night is over; it does not yet proclaim the full light of day. While it dispels the darkness and welcomes the light, it holds both of them, the one mixed with the other, as it were.  Are not all of us who follow the truth in this life daybreak and dawn? While we do some things which already belong to the light, we are not free from the remnants of darkness. In Scripture the Prophet says to God: “No living being will be justified in your sight”. Scripture also says: “In many ways all of us give offense”. […]  What is the place of the dawn but the perfect clearness of eternal vision? When the dawn has been brought there, it will retain nothing belonging to the darkness of night. When the Psalmist writes: My soul thirsts for the living God; when shall I go and see the face of God?, does he not refer to the effort made by the dawn to reach its place?  Paul was hastening to the place which he knew the dawn would reach when he said he wished to die and to be with Christ. He expressed the same idea when he said: For me to live is Christ, and to die is gain.


SPIRITUAL REFLECTION
The Church moves forward like the advancing dawn
From the Moral Reflections on Job by Saint Gregory the Great, pope
(Lib. 29,2-4: PL 76, 478-480)
Since the daybreak or the dawn is changed gradually from darkness into light, the Church, which comprises the elect, is fittingly styled daybreak or dawn. […]
This reference to the dawn conjures up a still more subtle consideration. The dawn intimates that the night is over; it does not yet proclaim the full light of day. While it dispels the darkness and welcomes the light, it holds both of them, the one mixed with the other, as it were.
Are not all of us who follow the truth in this life daybreak and dawn? While we do some things which already belong to the light, we are not free from the remnants of darkness.
In Scripture the Prophet says to God: “No living being will be justified in your sight”. Scripture also says: “In many ways all of us give offense”. […]
What is the place of the dawn but the perfect clearness of eternal vision? When the dawn has been brought there, it will retain nothing belonging to the darkness of night. When the Psalmist writes: My soul thirsts for the living God; when shall I go and see the face of God?, does he not refer to the effort made by the dawn to reach its place?
Paul was hastening to the place which he knew the dawn would reach when he said he wished to die and to be with Christ. He expressed the same idea when he said: For me to live is Christ, and to die is gain. (click to access site)

Pope Francis’ Daily Homilies: Spiritual Reflection: “The days between the resurrection and the ascension of the Lord” From a sermon by Saint Leo the Great, pope (Sermo 1 de Ascensione, 2-4: PL 54, 395-396)


The Ascension of Our Lord

The Ascension of Our Lord (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

You can access
NEWS.VA – Official Vatican Network

from the Widget on EUZICASA sidebar:

“The days between the resurrection and the ascension of the Lord”  From a sermon by Saint Leo the Great, pope (Sermo 1 de Ascensione, 2-4: PL 54, 395-396)  Beloved, the days which passed between the Lord’s resurrection and his ascension were by no means uneventful; during them great sacramental mysteries were confirmed, great truths revealed. In those days the fear of death with all its horrors was taken away, and the immortality of both body and soul affirmed. […]  The blessed apostles together with all the others had been intimidated by the catastrophe of the cross, and their faith in the resurrection had been uncertain; but now they were so strengthened by the evident truth that when their Lord ascended into heaven, far from feeling any sadness, they were filled with great joy.  Indeed that blessed company had a great and inexpressible cause for joy when it saw man’s nature rising above the dignity of the whole heavenly creation, above the ranks of angels, above the exalted status of archangels. Nor would there be any limit to its upward course until humanity was admitted to a seat at the right hand of the eternal Father, to be enthroned at last in the glory of him to whose nature it was wedded in the person of the Son.

“The days between the resurrection and the ascension of the Lord
From a sermon by Saint Leo the Great, pope
(Sermo 1 de Ascensione, 2-4: PL 54, 395-396)
Beloved, the days which passed between the Lord’s resurrection and his ascension were by no means uneventful; during them great sacramental mysteries were confirmed, great truths revealed. In those days the fear of death with all its horrors was taken away, and the immortality of both body and soul affirmed. […]
The blessed apostles together with all the others had been intimidated by the catastrophe of the cross, and their faith in the resurrection had been uncertain; but now they were so strengthened by the evident truth that when their Lord ascended into heaven, far from feeling any sadness, they were filled with great joy.
Indeed that blessed company had a great and inexpressible cause for joy when it saw man’s nature rising above the dignity of the whole heavenly creation, above the ranks of angels, above the exalted status of archangels. Nor would there be any limit to its upward course until humanity was admitted to a seat at the right hand of the eternal Father, to be enthroned at last in the glory of him to whose nature it was wedded in the person of the Son.

Pope Francis: Spare no effort in defending life, family :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


 

General audience with Pope Francis on March 18, 2015. Credit: Daniel Ibanez / CNA.

Vatican City, May 12, 2015 / 03:26 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In his meeting on Saturday with the bishops from Mozambique, a southeast African nation, Pope Francis urged support for public policies that promote the family and protect human life.

“Spare no efforts in supporting the family and in the defense of life from conception to natural death,” he said May 9 in the Vatican. “In this sense, remember the options appropriate to one of Christ‘s disciples and the beauty of being a mother, accompanied by the support of the family and the local community.”

“The family must always be defended as the main source of fraternity, respect for others and the primary path of peace.”

The Mozambican bishops – whose country borders Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Swaziland, South Africa, and the Indian Ocean – were in Rome for their five-yearly ad limina visit, a meeting with the Pope.

The Bishop of Rome cautioned his brother bishops against a worldly sense of success, saying, “the fecundity of our mission … is not measured by the number of collaborators, nor by the prestige of the institution, nor even by the quantity of available resources.”

“What counts is being permeated with Christ’s love, allowing oneself to be led by the Holy Spirit, and grafting one’s own existence onto the tree of life, which is the Cross of the Lord,” he said, adding that “from St. Paul, the insuperable model of the Christian missionary, we know that this means trying to conform to Jesus in his death so as to participate in his resurrection … the paschal mystery is the beating heart of the mission of the Church.”

“If you abide in this mystery, you will be protected both from a worldly and triumphalist vision of the mission, and the disappointment that may arise when faced with trials and failures.”

Pope Francis encouraged the bishops to be particularly solicitous for their priests as well as for the religious communities in their dioceses, and to live among their faithful in the “’existential peripheries’ where there is suffering, loneliness, and human degradation.”

Reflecting on the nature and role of a bishop, he said: “you are spouses of your diocesan community, profoundly tied to it.”

The Pope stated that “the pastors and the faithful of Mozambique need to further develop a culture of encounter,” saying Christ’s only request is “that you go out in search of the neediest.” He mentioned those who suffer from natural disasters, as well as displaced persons and refugees.

“These people need us to share in their suffering, their worries, their problems,” he told the bishops. “They need us to look upon them with love and you must reach out to them, as did Jesus.”

Turning to the challenges facing Mozambique, Pope Francis encouraged investment in education, so as to oppose inequality and social division. He said education “teaches the young to think critically, and offers a path towards maturity in values. In this sense, it is appropriate to raise awareness among leaders in society and to revive pastoral ministry in universities and schools, combining the task of education with the proclamation of the Gospel.”

“The needs are so great that they cannot be satisfied simply through individual initiatives or by a union of individuals educated in individualism. Community networks are needed to respond to social problems.”

He concluded by encouraging the bishops in going to the peripheries, saying, “When we go out to take the Gospel with true apostolic spirit, [Jesus] walks with us. He precedes us, and for us this is fundamental: God always goes before us.”

Tags: Pope Francis, Family, Pro-life, Abortion

via Pope Francis: Spare no effort in defending life, family :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Pope Francis sends a hug to moms worldwide for Mother’s Day :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)


 

Pope Francis greets pilgrims at St. Peter’s Square, Jan. 8, 2014. Credit: Kyle Burkhart/CNA.

Vatican City, May 10, 2015 / 09:28 am (CNA/EWTN News).- On Sunday, Pope Francis extended a special greeting to all those around the world who are celebrating Mother’s Day, after offering advice on loving to the point of laying down one’s life.

“We remember all mothers with gratitude and affection,” the Pope said to the crowds gathered in Saint Peter’s Square under the hot sun for the recitation of the Regina Caeli prayer May 10.

Speaking to the mothers after granting the apostolic blessing to those present, he noted that the applause from the crowd embraced all mothers: “those who live with us physically, but also those who live with us spiritually.”

The Pope also greeted those who were beginning to gather around the Vatican to take part in the March for Life. “It is important to collaborate together in order to defend and promote life,” he said.

In his address before the Regina Caeli, Pope Francis recounted Christ‘s words during the Last Supper: “This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. Greater love has no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

Christ says he loves us even though we have not merited this love, the Pope said. “In this way, Jesus shows us the path for following him, the path of love.”

Pope Francis explained that Christ’s command to love and to lay down one’s life for friends is new, insofar as it was he who first fulfilled it.

“The law of love is written once and for all in the heart of man” he said, “written with the fire of the Holy Spirit.”

“And with this same Spirit, which Jesus gives us, we too can walk along this path!”

Pope Francis’ reflection comes two weeks before Pentecost, on which the Church celebrates the Holy Spirit coming down upon the Apostles 50 days after Christ’s resurrection.

The path which leads us out of ourselves toward others is concrete, the Pope said.

“Jesus showed us that love for God puts into effect the love for others,” he added, explaining that these two loves go together.

There are many examples of this love throughout the Gospels: “adults and children, educated and ignorant, rich and poor, righteous and sinners, were welcomed in the heart of Christ.”

Pope Francis stressed this call to love one another, even when we don’t understand each other, or when we don’t get along: “It is here that one sees Christian love.”

This love is greater than differences of opinion or disposition, the Roman Pontiff said.

A love which has been “freed from selfishness,” it gives joy to our hearts.

Pope Francis spoke of the small gestures of closeness shown every day: given to an elderly person, a child, one who is sick, a person alone and in difficulty, without home or job, an immigrant, a refugee.

“The love which Christ has taught us is made manifest in these gestures,” he said.

Tags: Regina Caeli

via Pope Francis sends a hug to moms worldwide for Mother’s Day :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

today’s holiday: Feast of St. Paul’s Shipwreck (2015)


Feast of St. Paul’s Shipwreck (2015)

This feast is a commemoration in Malta of the shipwreck of St. Paul on the island in 60 CE, an event described in the New Testament. Paul was a prisoner on a ship, and when storms drove the ship aground, Paul was welcomed by the “barbarous people” (meaning they were not Greco-Romans). According to legend, he got their attention when a snake bit him on the hand but did him no harm, and he then healed people of diseases. Paul is the patron saint of Malta and snakebite victims. The day is a public holiday observed with family gatherings and religious ceremonies and processions. More… Discuss

quotation: ― Augustine of Hippo


 

“Because God has made us for Himself, our hearts are restless until they rest in Him.”
Augustine of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo by Sandro Botticelli, c. 1490.

Augustine of Hippo by Sandro Botticelli, c. 1490. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Christianity (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


Christianity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch, Danish painter, d. 1890.

Christianity (from the Ancient Greek word Χριστός, Christos, a translation of the Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ, Māšîăḥ, meaning “the anointed one”,[1] together with the Latin suffixes -ian and -itas) is an Abrahamic, monotheistic[2] religion based on the life and oral teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. Christianity is the world’s largest religion,[3][4] with about 2.4 billion adherents, known as Christians.[5][6][7][8] Christians believe that Jesus has a “unique significance” in the world.[9] Most Christians believe that Jesus is the Son of God, fully divine and fully human, and the saviour of humanity whose coming was prophesied in the Old Testament. Consequently, Christians refer to Jesus as Christ or the Messiah.

The foundations of Christian theology are expressed in ecumenical creeds. These professions of faith state that Jesus suffered, died, was buried, and was resurrected from the dead in order to grant eternal life to those who believe in him and trust in him for the remission of their sins. The creeds further maintain that Jesus bodily ascended into heaven, where he reigns with God the Father. Most Christian denominations teach that Jesus will return to judge everybody, living and dead, and to grant eternal life to his followers. He is considered the model of a virtuous life. His ministry, crucifixion, and resurrection are often referred to as “the gospel“, meaning “good news” (a loan translation of the Greek: εὐαγγέλιον euangélion). The term gospel also refers to written accounts of Jesus’s life and teaching, four of which – the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John – are considered canonical and included in Christian Bibles.

Christianity began as a Second Temple Judaic sect in the mid-1st century.[10][11] Originating in the Levant region of the Middle East, it quickly spread to Europe, Syria, Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, and Egypt. It grew in size and influence over a few centuries, and by the end of the 4th century had become the official state church of the Roman Empire, replacing other forms of religion practiced under Roman rule.[12] During the Middle Ages, most of the remainder of Europe was Christianized, and adherents were gained in the Middle East, North Africa, Ethiopia, and parts of India.[13][14] Following the Age of Discovery, Christianity spread to the Americas, Australasia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the rest of the world through missionary work and colonization.[15][16][17] Christianity has played a prominent role in the shaping of Western civilization.[18][19][20][21][22]

Worldwide, the three largest groups of Christianity are the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the various denominations of Protestantism. The Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox patriarchates split from one another in the schism of the 11th century, and Protestantism came into existence during the Reformation of the 16th century, splitting from the Roman Catholic Church.[23]

Beliefs

Christians share a certain set of beliefs that they hold as essential to their faith, though there are many important differences of interpretation and opinion of the Bible on which Christianity is based.[24]

Creeds

Main article: Creeds

Concise doctrinal statements or confessions of religious beliefs are known as creeds (from Latin credo, meaning “I believe”). They began as baptismal formulae and were later expanded during the Christological controversies of the 4th and 5th centuries to become statements of faith.

Many evangelical Protestants reject creeds as definitive statements of faith, even while agreeing with some or all of the substance of the creeds. The Baptists have been non-creedal “in that they have not sought to establish binding authoritative confessions of faith on one another.”[25]:p.111 Also rejecting creeds are groups with roots in the Restoration Movement, such as the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), the Evangelical Christian Church in Canada and the Churches of Christ.[26][27]:14–15[28]:123

 An Eastern Christian Icon depicting Emperor Constantine and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.

The Apostles’ Creed remains the most popular statement of the articles of Christian faith which are generally acceptable to most Christian denominations that are creedal. It is widely used by a number of Christian denominations for both liturgical and catechetical purposes, most visibly by liturgical Churches of Western Christian tradition, including the Latin Church of the Catholic Church, Lutheranism, Anglicanism, and Western Rite Orthodoxy. It is also used by Presbyterians, Methodists, and Congregationalists. This particular creed was developed between the 2nd and 9th centuries. Its central doctrines are those of the Trinity and God the Creator. Each of the doctrines found in this creed can be traced to statements current in the apostolic period. The creed was apparently used as a summary of Christian doctrine for baptismal candidates in the churches of Rome.[29]

Its main points include:

The Nicene Creed, largely a response to Arianism, was formulated at the Councils of Nicaea and Constantinople in 325 and 381 respectively[30][31] and ratified as the universal creed of Christendom by the First Council of Ephesus in 431.[32]

The Chalcedonian Definition, or Creed of Chalcedon, developed at the Council of Chalcedon in 451,[33] though rejected by the Oriental Orthodox Churches,[34] taught Christ “to be acknowledged in two natures, inconfusedly, unchangeably, indivisibly, inseparably”: one divine and one human, and that both natures, while perfect in themselves, are nevertheless also perfectly united into one person.[35]

The Athanasian Creed, received in the Western Church as having the same status as the Nicene and Chalcedonian, says: “We worship one God in Trinity, and Trinity in Unity; neither confounding the Persons nor dividing the Substance.”[36]

Most Christians (Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Protestants alike) accept the use of creeds, and subscribe to at least one of the creeds mentioned above.[37]

Ten Commandments

Main article: Ten Commandments

The Ten Commandments are a set of biblical principles relating to ethics and worship which play a fundamental role in Judaism and most forms of Christianity. They include instructions to worship only God and to keep the Sabbath, and prohibitions against idolatry, blasphemy, murder, theft, and adultery. Different groups follow slightly different traditions for interpreting and numbering them. According to the synoptic gospels, Christ generalised the law into two underlying principles; The first is “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one; and you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength.” While the second is “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”[Matthew 22:34–40][Mark 12:28–33]

These are quotes from Deuteronomy 6:4 and Leviticus 19:18. Barnes’ Notes on the New Testament comments on these verses saying: “These comprehend the substance of what Moses in the law, and what the prophets have spoken. What they have said has been to endeavour to win men to the love of God and each other. Love to God and man comprehends the whole [of] religion; and to produce this has been the design of Moses, the prophets, the Saviour, and the apostles.”[38]

Jesus Christ

The central tenet of Christianity is the belief in Jesus as the Son of God and the Messiah (Christ). Christians believe that Jesus, as the Messiah, was anointed by God as savior of humanity, and hold that Jesus’ coming was the fulfillment of messianic prophecies of the Old Testament. The Christian concept of the Messiah differs significantly from the contemporary Jewish concept. The core Christian belief is that through belief in and acceptance of the death and resurrection of Jesus, sinful humans can be reconciled to God and thereby are offered salvation and the promise of eternal life.[39]

While there have been many theological disputes over the nature of Jesus over the earliest centuries of Christian history, Christians generally believe that Jesus is God incarnate and “true God and true man” (or both fully divine and fully human). Jesus, having become fully human, suffered the pains and temptations of a mortal man, but did not sin. As fully God, he rose to life again. According to the Bible, “God raised him from the dead”,[40] he ascended to heaven, is “seated at the right hand of the Father”[41] and will ultimately return[Acts 1:9–11] to fulfill the rest of Messianic prophecy such as the Resurrection of the dead, the Last Judgment and final establishment of the Kingdom of God.

According to the canonical gospels of Matthew and Luke, Jesus was conceived by the Holy Spirit and born from the Virgin Mary. Little of Jesus’ childhood is recorded in the canonical Gospels, however infancy Gospels were popular in antiquity. In comparison, his adulthood, especially the week before his death, is well documented in the Gospels contained within the New Testament, because that part of his life was believed to be most important. The Biblical accounts of Jesus’ ministry include: his baptism, miracles, preaching, teaching, and deeds.

Death and resurrection

 
Crucifixion, representing the death of Jesus on the Cross, painting by D. Velázquez, 17th century

 
Resurrection of Christ by Noel Coypel, 1700, using a hovering depiction of Jesus.

Christians consider the resurrection of Jesus to be the cornerstone of their faith (see 1 Corinthians 15) and the most important event in history.[42] Among Christian beliefs, the death and resurrection of Jesus are two core events on which much of Christian doctrine and theology is based.[43][44] According to the New Testament Jesus was crucified, died a physical death, was buried within a tomb, and rose from the dead three days later.[Jn. 19:30–31] [Mk. 16:1] [16:6]

The New Testament mentions several resurrection appearances of Jesus on different occasions to his twelve apostles and disciples, including “more than five hundred brethren at once”,[1Cor 15:6] before Jesus’ Ascension to heaven. Jesus’ death and resurrection are commemorated by Christians in all worship services, with special emphasis during Holy Week which includes Good Friday and Easter Sunday.

The death and resurrection of Jesus are usually considered the most important events in Christian theology, partly because they demonstrate that Jesus has power over life and death and therefore has the authority and power to give people eternal life.[45]

Christian churches accept and teach the New Testament account of the resurrection of Jesus with very few exceptions.[46] Some modern scholars use the belief of Jesus’ followers in the resurrection as a point of departure for establishing the continuity of the historical Jesus and the proclamation of the early church.[47] Some liberal Christians do not accept a literal bodily resurrection,[48][49] seeing the story as richly symbolic and spiritually nourishing myth. Arguments over death and resurrection claims occur at many religious debates and interfaith dialogues.[50] Paul the Apostle, an early Christian convert and missionary, wrote, “If Christ was not raised, then all our preaching is useless, and your trust in God is useless.”[1Cor 15:14] [51]

Salvation

Paul the Apostle, like Jews and Roman pagans of his time, believed that sacrifice can bring about new kinship ties, purity, and eternal life.[52] For Paul the necessary sacrifice was the death of Jesus: Gentiles who are “Christ’s” are, like Israel, descendants of Abraham and “heirs according to the promise”.[Gal. 3:29] [53] The God who raised Jesus from the dead would also give new life to the “mortal bodies” of Gentile Christians, who had become with Israel the “children of God” and were therefore no longer “in the flesh”.[Rom. 8:9,11,16] [52]

Modern Christian churches tend to be much more concerned with how humanity can be saved from a universal condition of sin and death than the question of how both Jews and Gentiles can be in God’s family. According to both Catholic and Protestant doctrine, salvation comes by Jesus’ substitutionary death and resurrection. The Catholic Church teaches that salvation does not occur without faithfulness on the part of Christians; converts must live in accordance with principles of love and ordinarily must be baptized.[54][55] Martin Luther taught that baptism was necessary for salvation, but modern Lutherans and other Protestants tend to teach that salvation is a gift that comes to an individual by God’s grace, sometimes defined as “unmerited favor”, even apart from baptism.

Christians differ in their views on the extent to which individuals’ salvation is pre-ordained by God. Reformed theology places distinctive emphasis on grace by teaching that individuals are completely incapable of self-redemption, but that sanctifying grace is irresistible.[56] In contrast Catholics, Orthodox Christians and Arminian Protestants believe that the exercise of free will is necessary to have faith in Jesus.[57]

Trinity

Main article: Trinity

 The Trinity is the belief that God is one God in three persons: God the Father, God the Son (Jesus), and God the Holy Spirit

Trinity refers to the teaching that the one God[2] comprises three distinct, eternally co-existing persons; the Father, the Son (incarnate in Jesus Christ), and the Holy Spirit. Together, these three persons are sometimes called the Godhead,[58][59][60] although there is no single term in use in Scripture to denote the unified Godhead.[61] In the words of the Athanasian Creed, an early statement of Christian belief, “the Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Spirit is God, and yet there are not three Gods but one God”.[62] They are distinct from another: the Father has no source, the Son is begotten of the Father, and the Spirit proceeds from the Father. Though distinct, the three persons cannot be divided from one another in being or in operation.[63]

The Trinity is an essential doctrine of mainstream Christianity. “Father, Son and Holy Spirit” represents both the immanence and transcendence of God. God is believed to be infinite and God’s presence may be perceived through the actions of Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit.[64]

According to this doctrine, God is not divided in the sense that each person has a third of the whole; rather, each person is considered to be fully God (see Perichoresis). The distinction lies in their relations, the Father being unbegotten; the Son being begotten of the Father; and the Holy Spirit proceeding from the Father and (in Western Christian theology) from the Son. Regardless of this apparent difference, the three ‘persons’ are each eternal and omnipotent.

The word trias, from which trinity is derived, is first seen in the works of Theophilus of Antioch. He wrote of “the Trinity of God (the Father), His Word (the Son) and His Wisdom (Holy Spirit)”.[65] The term may have been in use before this time. Afterwards it appears in Tertullian.[66][67] In the following century the word was in general use. It is found in many passages of Origen.[68]

Trinitarians

Main article: Trinitarianism

Trinitarianism denotes those Christians who believe in the concept of the Trinity. Almost all Christian denominations and Churches hold Trinitarian beliefs. Although the words “Trinity” and “Triune” do not appear in the Bible, theologians beginning in the 3rd century developed the term and concept to facilitate comprehension of the New Testament teachings of God as Father, God as Jesus the Son, and God as the Holy Spirit. Since that time, Christian theologians have been careful to emphasize that Trinity does not imply three gods, nor that each member of the Trinity is one-third of an infinite God; Trinity is defined as one God in three Persons.[69]

Nontrinitarians

Main article: Nontrinitarianism

Nontrinitarianism refers to theology that rejects the doctrine of the Trinity. Various nontrinitarian views, such as adoptionism or modalism, existed in early Christianity, leading to the disputes about Christology.[70] Nontrinitarianism later appeared again in the Gnosticism of the Cathars in the 11th through 13th centuries, and by groups with Unitarian theology in the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century,[71] and in the Age of Enlightenment of the 18th century, and in some groups arising during the Second Great Awakening of the 19th century.

Scriptures

Christianity, like other religions, has adherents whose beliefs and biblical interpretations vary. Christianity regards the biblical canon, the Old Testament and the New Testament, as the inspired word of God. The traditional view of inspiration is that God worked through human authors so that what they produced was what God wished to communicate. The Greek word referring to inspiration in 2 Timothy 3:16 is Theopneustos, which literally means “God-breathed”.[72]

Some believe that divine inspiration makes our present Bibles inerrant. Others claim inerrancy for the Bible in its original manuscripts, although none of those are extant. Still others maintain that only a particular translation is inerrant, such as the King James Version.[73][74][75] Another view closely related is Biblical infallibility or limited inerrancy, which affirms that the Bible is free of error as a guide to salvation, but may include errors on matters such as history, geography or science.

 The Gutenberg Bible, the first printed Bible

The books of the Bible accepted among the Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant churches vary somewhat, with Jews accepting only the Hebrew Bible as canonical; there is however substantial overlap. These variations are a reflection of the range of traditions, and of the councils that have convened on the subject. Every version of the Old Testament always includes the books of the Tanakh, the canon of the Hebrew Bible. The Catholic and Orthodox canons, in addition to the Tanakh, also include the Deuterocanonical Books as part of the Old Testament. These books appear in the Septuagint, but are regarded by Protestants to be apocryphal. However, they are considered to be important historical documents which help to inform the understanding of words, grammar and syntax used in the historical period of their conception. Some versions of the Bible include a separate Apocrypha section between the Old Testament and the New Testament.[76] The New Testament, originally written in Koine Greek, contains 27 books which are agreed upon by all churches.

Modern scholarship has raised many issues with the Bible. While the Authorized King James Version is held to by many because of its striking English prose, in fact it was translated from the Erasmus Greek Bible which in turn “was based on a single 12th Century manuscript that is one of the worst manuscripts we have available to us”.[77] Much scholarship in the past several hundred years has gone into comparing different manuscripts in order to reconstruct the original text. Another issue is that several books are considered to be forgeries. The injunction that women “be silent and submissive” in 1 Timothy 12[78] is thought by many to be a forgery by a follower of Paul, a similar phrase in 1 Corinthians 14,[79] which is thought to be by Paul, appears in different places in different manuscripts and is thought to originally be a margin note by a copyist.[77] Other verses in 1 Corinthians, such as 1 Corinthians 11:2–16 where women are instructed to wear a covering over their hair “when they pray or prophesies”,[80] contradict this verse.

A final issue with the Bible is the way in which books were selected for inclusion in the New Testament. Other Gospels have now been recovered, such as those found near Nag Hammadi in 1945, and while some of these texts are quite different from what Christians have been used to, it should be understood that some of this newly recovered Gospel material is quite possibly contemporaneous with, or even earlier than, the New Testament Gospels. The core of the Gospel of Thomas, in particular, may date from as early as 50 AD, and if so would provide an insight into the earliest gospel texts that underlie the canonical Gospels, texts that are mentioned in Luke 1:1–2. The Gospel of Thomas contains much that is familiar from the canonical Gospels – verse 113, for example (“The Father’s Kingdom is spread out upon the earth, but people do not see it”),[81] is reminiscent of Luke 17:20–21[82][83] – and the Gospel of John, with a terminology and approach that is suggestive of what was later termed Gnosticism, has recently been seen as a possible response to the Gospel of Thomas, a text that is commonly labelled proto-Gnostic. Scholarship, then, is currently exploring the relationship in the Early Church between mystical speculation and experience on the one hand and the search for church order on the other, by analyzing new-found texts, by subjecting canonical texts to further scrutiny, and by an examination of the passage of New Testament texts to canonical status.

Catholic and Orthodox interpretations

 St. Peter’s Basilica, Vatican City, the largest church in the world and a symbol of the Catholic Church.

In antiquity, two schools of exegesis developed in Alexandria and Antioch. Alexandrine interpretation, exemplified by Origen, tended to read Scripture allegorically, while Antiochene interpretation adhered to the literal sense, holding that other meanings (called theoria) could only be accepted if based on the literal meaning.[84]

Catholic theology distinguishes two senses of scripture: the literal and the spiritual.[85]

The literal sense of understanding scripture is the meaning conveyed by the words of Scripture. The spiritual sense is further subdivided into:

Regarding exegesis, following the rules of sound interpretation, Catholic theology holds:

  • the injunction that all other senses of sacred scripture are based on the literal[86][87]
  • that the historicity of the Gospels must be absolutely and constantly held[88]
  • that scripture must be read within the “living Tradition of the whole Church”[89] and
  • that “the task of interpretation has been entrusted to the bishops in communion with the successor of Peter, the Bishop of Rome“.[90]

Saint of the Day for Sunday, February 8th, 2015 : St. Jerome Emiliani


Image of St. Jerome Emiliani

St. Jerome Emiliani

Jerome Emiliani lay chained in the dark dirty dungeon. Only a short time before he had been a military commander for Venice in charge of a fortress. He didn’t care much about God because he didn’t … continue reading

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Saint of the Day for Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015: St. Blaise


Saint of the Day for Monday, January 26th, 2015: St. Timothy


Image of St. Timothy

St. Timothy

Born at Lystra, Lycaenia, Timothy was the son of a Greek father and Eunice, a converted Jewess. He joined St. Paul when Paul preached at Lystra replacing Barnabas, and became Paul’s close friend and … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

more than an article: Handel – Water Music Check this YouTube documentary….You’ll love it!


Handel

Handel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Water Music

In 1712, George Frideric Handel took up permanent residence in England, leaving his employer—the elector of Hanover—behind in Germany. Two years later, the elector of Hanover became George I of England. When the king requested music for royal festivities, Handel wrote Water Music, allegedly to regain the king’s favor. Water Music debuted on a barge accompanying the king down the River Thames in 1717. What did George I think of Handel’s now-famous collection of songs? More… Discuss

Händel: Water music & Music for the royal fireworks | Hervé Niquet

 

this day in the yesteryear: Joan of Arc Goes on Trial (1431)


Joan of Arc Goes on Trial (1431)

Joan of Arc was a French military leader and heroine who was canonized a saint in 1920, nearly 500 years after she was burned at the stake. Claiming to be inspired by religious visions, she organized the French resistance that forced the English to end their siege of Orléans in 1429 and led an army to Rheims, where she had the dauphin, Charles VII, crowned king. Captured and sold to the English by the Burgundians, she was later tried for heresy and executed. What was the “nullification trial”? More… Discuss

*** More  HERE

Saint of the Day for Thursday, January 1st, 2015: Mary the Blessed Virgin


.@eharris_it Francis is NOT pope he has violated God’s law & Christ’s teachings & seeks to corrupt the #Catholic faith— Pray For Life (@Pray_4_Life)


word: circumspect


circumspect

Definition: (adjective) Heedful of circumstances and potential consequences; prudent.
Synonyms: discreet
Usage: Because the drug was shown to have adverse side effects, physicians are now more circumspect about recommending its use. Discuss.

Did Anastasia Survive? (THE GREATEST UNSOLVED MYSTERIES OF ALL TIME) (My media collection)


SEVERAL APPS WERE EMPLOYED IN THE MAKING OF THIS IMAGE:

  1. Scanner
  2. IrfanView Software (to assemble the two jpegs, in horizontal display)
  3. FastStone Photo Editor Software ( for image editing-colors, contrast and illumination, and finally for the border mask and final cropping)

I like what came out of it!

Did Anastasia Survive? (THE GREATEST UNSOLVED MISTERIES OF ALL TIME)

Did Anastasia Survive? (THE GREATEST UNSOLVED MYSTERIES OF ALL TIME) (My Media Collecttion)

Saint of the Day for Friday, December 26th, 2014: St. Stephen Observed worldwide by Christians of all denominations


Pope Dionysius (259 - 268), Fresco in Sixtine ...

Pope Dionysius (259 – 268), Fresco in Sixtine Chapel, Vatican (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Image of St. Stephen

St. Stephen

Stephen’s name means “crown,” and he was the first disciple of Jesus to receive the martyr’s crown. Stephen was a deacon in the early Christian Church. The apostles had found that they … continue reading

Pope Zosimus

Pope Zosimus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Händel Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus: make music part of your life series


Händel Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus

today holiday: Tolling the Devil’s Knell (2014)


Tolling the Devil’s Knell (2014)

To celebrate the birth of Christ and the death of the Devil, All Saints Minster Church in Dewsbury, Yorkshire, rings its bell the same number of times as the number of the year (for example, 2,014 times in 2014) on Christmas Eve. The tolling starts at 11:00 PM, stops during the church service from midnight to 12:45, and then resumes until the years have been tolled away. The custom has been going on for almost 700 years. The bell has been called “Black Tom of Soothill” since the 13th century, and Tolling Black Tom is supposed to keep the parish safe from the Devil for another 12 months. More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Sunday, November 30th, 2014 Image of St. Andrew: Patron Saint of Romania


Image of St. Andrew

St. Andrew

Andrew, like his brother Simon Peter, was a fisherman. He became a disciple of the great St. John the Baptist, but when John pointed to Jesus and said, “Behold the Lamb of God!” Andrew understood … continue reading

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Saint Andrew in Romania

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Church of Saint Andrew in Ion Corvin, Constanța (completed 2002)

Church of Saint Andrew in Ion Corvin, Constanța (completed 2002)

The story of Saint Andrew in Romania tells that today’s territory of Romania was Christianized by Saint Andrew in the 1st century AD. These claims are backed by some historians and by several Christian artifacts discovered and dated to the third century BC.[1][2]

The story is based on references by 3rd century writer Hippolytus of Rome in “On Apostles”, mentioning Saint Andrew’s voyage to Scythia and on works by several authors which also mention the voyage, such as: Eusebius in the Chronicles of Eusebius,[3] Origen in the third book of his Commentaries on the Genesis (254 C.E.), Usaard in his Martyrdom written between 845-865, and Jacobus de Voragine in the Golden Legend (c. 1260). Scythia generally refers to a land in what is now Romania (Scythia Minor), Ukraine and southern Russia.

The Story

Historian Alexandru Barnea states that a tale started to circulate in the first half of the 20th century.[4] It tells of Saint Andrew’s arrival in Dobruja during a harsh winter, fighting wild beasts and the blizzard before reaching a cave. At the cave, Saint Andrew hit the ground with his walking stick and a spring came in to being, in the waters of which he baptized the locals and cured the ill, thus converting the whole area to Christianity.[4] This tale seems to be heavily based on the Chronicles of Eusebius.

According to some modern Romanian scholars, the idea of early Christianisation is unsustainable. They take the idea to be a part of an ideology of protochronism which purports that the Orthodox Church has been a companion and defender of the Romanian people for its entire history, which was then used for propaganda purposes during the communist era.[5] However, other works indicate that communists did not use this idea for propaganda but rather acted strongly against religion, persecuting Christians and promoting atheism as the belief system.[6][7][8]

Romanian researcher, George Alexandrou,[9] maintains that St. Andrew spent 20 years in the territories of the Daco-Romans, preaching and teaching. During that period St. Andrew traveled around the Lower Danube territories and along the coast of the Black Sea, but mostly he stayed in and around his cave in Dobruja (located in the vicinity of the Ion Corvin village). St. Andrew’s cave is still kept as a holy place. Later, John Cassian (360-435), Dionysius Exiguus (470-574) and Joannes Maxentius (leader of the so-called Scythian Monks) lived in the same area, known as Scythia Minor or Dobruja, in South East Romania.[10]

Saint Andrew’s Cave

According to Hippolyte of Antioch, (died c. 250 C.E.) in his On Apostles, Origen, in the third book of his Commentaries on the Genesis (254 C.E.), Eusebius of Caesarea in his Church History (340 C.E.), and other sources, like the Usaard’s Martyrdom written between 845-865, and Jacobus de Voragine in Golden Legend (c. 1260), Saint Andrew preached in Scythia Minor. St. Philip may have also preached in the area.[11] There are toponyms and numerous very old traditions (like carols) related to Saint Andrew, many of them having probably a pre-Christian substratum.[12][13][14] In Dobruja, a cave where he supposedly preached, is called “Saint Andrew’s Cave” and advertised as a pilgrimage site.

According to Radu Cinpoes (Cimpoesh?), there is no clear evidence concerning missionary work on the part of St. Andrew near Dobruja.[15]

Patron saint of Romania

In 1994, Saint Andrew was named the patron saint of Dobruja (Rom. Dobrogea), in 1997 the patron saint of Romania, while in 2012, November 30 became a public holiday.[4]
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Saint of the Day for Wednesday, November 26th, 2014: Berchmans


Image of St. John Berchmans   St. John Berchmans

Eldest son of a shoemaker, John was born at Diest, Brabant. He early wanted to be a priest, and when thirteen became a servant in the household of one of the Cathedral canons at Malines, John … continue reading

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Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring: make music part of your life


Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

November 22 – Feast date for St. Cecilia, patron saint of music— Classical KUSC


Song for Saint Cecilia

 

Bach Busoni Chorale Prelude BWV 639 “Ich ruf zu dir Herr Jesu Christ”- VAlentina Lisitsa: great compositions/performances


Bach – Busoni: Chorale Prelude BWV 639 Ich ruf zu dir Herr Jesu Christ

Adoramus Te (Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina): a prayer for Ukraine



from

Adoramus Te (Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina)

“Adoramus Te” by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina. Performed by the Crown College Choir, directed by Dr. David W. Donelson.

“Adoramus Te is a stanza that is recited/sung mostly during the Stations of the Cross of the Catholic tradition. It is retained in some confessional Anglican and Lutheran traditions during the Good Friday liturgy, although generally in the vernacular. It is recited or sung between stations. The words in Latin and their translation in English are as follows:

Adoramus te, Christe,
et benedicimus tibi,
quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum.
Qui passus es pro nobis, Domine,
Domine, miserere nobis.

We adore Thee, O Christ,
And we bless Thee,
Who by Thy Holy Cross
hath redeemed the world.”

Ми тебе обожнюю, Христе,
benedicimus ET Тібі,
Quia Туам вашим Святого Хреста redemisti Mundum.
Квай passus є про Нобіс, Domine,
Domine, Miserere NOBIS.

(translated by Google Translate)

today’s Saint, July 30, 2014: St. Peter Chrysologus (Feastday: July 30)


 

 

 

 

 

Pedro crisologo01.jpgSt. Peter Chrysologus
Greek: Ἅγιος Πέτρος ὁ Χρυσολόγος, Petros Chrysologos meaning Peter the “golden-worded”)
He is revered as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church.

 

Feastday: July 30
Birth: 380
Death: 450

 

St. Peter Chrysologus, Bishop and Doctor of the Church (Feast-July 30) Born at Imola, Italy in 406, St. Peter was baptized, educated, and ordained a deacon by Cornelius, Bishop of Imola. St. Peter merited being called “Chrysologus” (golden-worded) from his exceptional oratorical eloquence. In 433, Pope Sixtus III consecrated him bishop of Ravenna. He practiced many corporal and spiritual works of mercy, and ruled his flock with utmost diligence and care. He extirpated the last vestiges of paganism and other abuses that had sprouted among his people, cautioning them especially against indecent dancing. “Anyone who wishes to frolic with the devil,” he remarked, “cannot rejoice with Christ.” He also counseled the heretic Eutyches (who had asked for his support) to avoid causing division but to learn from the other heretics who were crushed when they hurled themselves against the Rock of Peter. He died at Imola, Italy in 450 and in 1729 was made a Doctor of the Church, largely as a result of his simple, practical, and clear sermons which have come down to us, nearly all dealing with Gospel subjects.

 

When in 1729 he was declared a Doctor of the Church, his feast day, not already included in the Tridentine Calendar, was inserted in the General Roman Calendar for celebration on 4 December. In 1969 his feast was moved to 30 July, as close as possible to the day of his death, 31 July, the feast day of Saint Ignatius of Loyola.

 

A contemporary portrait of Saint Peter Chrysologus, found in the mosaics of the Church of San Giovanni Evangelista in Ravenna, depicts him among the members of the eastern and western imperial family, showing his extraordinary influence.

 

 

 

Johann Sebastian Bach: Cantata #68, Aria “My heart ever faithful” BWV 68 (make music part of your life series)


 

 

 

 

 

Saint of the Day July 3, 2014: St. Thomas


Saint of the Day

The Immortals, poetic thought by George-B (©Always)


The Immortals, poetic thought by George-B (©Always)

The immortals are fighting gloves off,
The mortals are scared to death
Immortals buy,
Mortal rent,
immortals are cared for
Mortals have less…
Immortals couldn’t care less: hahahaha (can you hear them laugh?)

Saint of the Day May 12: Sts. Nereus & Achilleus


Saint of the Day

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Ensemble Passero – Adoramus te Christe von G.P. da Palestrina (1525-1594)


[youtube.com/watch?v=bY-ap10ADeM]

Adoramus te Christe von G.P. da Palestrina (1525-1594)
gesungen vom Ensemble Passero am 2. März 2013 in der Alten Kapelle zu Regensburg anlässlich des Konzertes “Glaube als Passion – Botschaften Papst Benedikts XVI. in Liedern”

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Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus–Beethoven Oratorio: Christ on the Mount of Olives–Hallelujah



Oratorio, “Christ on the Mount of Olives

Ludwig Van Beethoven
(1770-1827)

Beethoven wrote but one oratorio, “Christus am Oelberge” (“Christ on the Mount of Olives”). It was begun in 1800 and finished during the following year. The text is by Huber, and was written, with Beethoven’s assistance, in fourteen days. The first performance of the work is entirely took place at Vienna, April 5, 1803, at the Theater an der Wien.

The closing number, a chorus of angels (“Hallelujah, God‘s almighty Son”), is introduced with a short but massive symphony leading to a jubilant burst of “Hallelujah,” which finally resolves itself into a glorious fugue. In all sacred music it is difficult to find a choral number which can surpass it in majesty or power.


Lyrics for the Hallelujah

Hallelujah unto God’s Almighty Son Praise the Lord, ye bright angelic choirs
In holy songs of Joy.
Man, proclaim his grace and glory,
Hallelujah unto God’s Almighty Son
Praise the Lord in holy songs of joy.



FROM THE COUNCIL OF TRENT

Resurrection

By the word Resurrection, however, we are not merely to understand that Christ was raised from the dead, which happened to many others, but that He rose by His own power and virtue, a singular prerogative peculiar to Him alone. For it is incompatible with nature and was never given to man to raise himself by his own power, from death to life. This was reserved for the almighty power of God, as we learn from these words of the Apostle: Although he was crucified through weakness, yet he liveth by the power of God. This divine power, having never been separated, either from His body in the grave, or from His soul in hell, there existed a divine force both within the body, by which it could be again united to the soul, and within the soul, by which it could again return to the body. Thus He was able by His own power to return to life and rise from the dead.


Ascension

Filled with the Spirit of God, and contemplating the blessed and glorious Ascension of our Lord, the Prophet David exhorts all to celebrate that splendid triumph with the greatest joy and gladness: Clap your hands, all ye nations: shout unto God with he voice of joy…. God is ascended with jubilee. 

This, then, the faithful must believe without hesitation, that Jesus Christ, having fully accomplished the work of Redemption, ascended as man, body and soul, into heaven; for as God He never forsook heaven, filling as He does all places with His Divinity. 

He ascended by His own power, not being taken up by the power of another, as was Elias, who was carried to heaven in a fiery chariot; or, as the Prophet Habacuc, or Philip, the deacon, who were borne through the air by the divine power, and traversed great distances.

Neither did He ascend into heaven solely by the exercise of His supreme power as God, but also by virtue of the power which He possessed as man. Although human power alone was insufficient to accomplish this, yet the virtue with which the blessed soul of Christ was endowed was capable of moving the body as it pleased, and His body, now glorified, readily obeyed the behest of the soul that moved it. Hence, we believe that Christ ascended into heaven as God and man by His own power.


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http://catholicharboroffaithandmorals…

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Sain of the Day Feastday April 23: St. George: Patron of England & Catalonia


Image of St. George

Pictures of St. George usually show him killing a dragon to rescue a beautiful lady. The dragon stands for wickedness. The lady stands for God‘s holy truth. St. George was a brave martyr who was victorious over the devil.

He was a soldier in the army of the Roman Emperor Diocletian, and he was one of the Emperor’s favorite soldiers. Now Diocletian was a pagan and a bitter enemy to the Christians. He put to death every Christian he could find. George was a brave Christian, a real soldier of Christ. Without fear, he went to the Emperor and sternly scolded him for being so cruel. Then he gave up his position in the Roman army. For this he was tortured in many terrible ways and finally beheaded.

So boldly daring and so cheerful was St. George in declaring his Faith and in dying for it that Christians felt courage when they heard about it. Many songs and poems were written about this martyr. Soldiers, especially, have always been devoted to him.

We all have some “dragon” we have to conquer. It might be pride, or anger, or laziness, or greediness, or something else. Let us make sure we fight against these “dragons”, with God’s help. Then we can call ourselves real soldiers of Christ. 

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MAKE MUSIC PAST OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Messiah-Part III: Worthy is the Lamb-


[youtube.com/watch?v=5-EHvdAOnQo]

Messiah-Part III: Worthy is the LambGeorge Frideric Handel-bekhit

Worthy is the Lamb that was slain, and hath redeemed us to God by His blood, to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing. Blessing and honour, glory and power, be unto Him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb, for ever and ever. Amen.
(Revelation 5 : 12-13)

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Paschal Troparion ‘Christ is risen” in different languages part 2


[youtube.com/watch?v=SynvdFT-rqU]

Paschal TroparionChrist is risen” in different languages part 2

It is probably the most known and beautiful Orthodox Christian hymn. It is sung at the Feast of Feasts – the Holy Pascha (Easter) that’s the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

In this part the troparion is chanted by various choirs in different melodies in such languages:
French – Christ est ressuscité

Ukrainian:
Христос воскрес із мертвих,
смертю смерть подолав,
і тим, що в гробах,
життя дарував

Swedish – Kristus är uppstånden

Filipino (Tagalog):
Si Kristo ay nabuhay mula sa mga patay,
Sa pamamagitan ng kanyang kamatayan,
nilupig niya ang kamatayan,
At ang mga nasa himlayan
Ay binigyan niya ng buhay

Spanish (espanol) – ¡Cristo ha resucitado!

Greek:
Χριστὸς ἀνέστη ἐκ νεκρῶν,
θανάτῳ θάνατον πατήσας,
καὶ τοῖς ἐν τοῖς μνήμασι,
ζωὴν χαρισάμενος

Old Church Slavonic (the version of Old Believers) – Christos woskresie!
Swahili – Kristo Amefufukka
Arabic – المسيح قام
Romanian – Hristos a înviat
Afrikaans (Paasfees) – Christus het opgestaan

Finnish (Pääsiäinen):
Kristus nousi kuolleista,
kuolemallaan kuoleman voitti
ja haudoissa oleville elämän antoi 

Latin – Christus resurrexit
German – Christus ist auferstanden
Albanian (Pashka) – Krishti u ngjall!
English
Church Slavonic – Христос воскресе
Catalan – Crist ha ressuscitat
Romanian
Church Slavonic – Hristos voskrese
Hungarian

Dutch:
Christus is opgestaan uit de doden,
door Zijn dood vertreedt Hij de dood
en schenkt het Leven
aan hen in het graf

Greek:
Christos anesti ek nekrón,
thanáto thánaton patísas,
ké tís en tís mnímasi,
zoín charisámenos

Armenian – Քրիստոս յարեաւ ի մեռելոց՜ 
K’ristos haryav i mereloc’.
Mahvamb zmah koxeac’
yev merelyac’
kyank pargevec’av

Czech:
Vstal z mrtvých Kristus,
smrtí smrt překonal
a jsoucím ve hrobech,
život daroval

Coptic – Pikhristos Aftonf

Italian:
Cristo è risorto dai morti,
Con la morte ha vinto la morte,
E a quelli nelle tombe
Ha donato la vita

English
Georgian – ქრისტე აღსდგა
Kriste aghsdga mkvdretit,
sikvdilita sikvdilisa damtrgunveli,
da saplavebis shinata
tskhovrebis mimnichebeli

Church Slavonic:
Христос воскресе из мертвих, 
смертију смерт поправ 
и сушчим во гробјех живот даровав

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SAINT OF THE DAY – APRIL 13: ST. MARTIN I


SAINT OF THE DAY
Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives. Each saint the Church honors responded to God’s invitation to use his or her unique gifts. God calls each one of us to be a saint. Click here to receive Saint of the Day in your email.

April 13
St. Martin I
(d. 655)
When Martin I became pope in 649, Constantinople was the capital of the Byzantine empire and the patriarch of Constantinople was the most influential Church leader in the eastern Christian world. The struggles that existed within the Church at that time were magnified by the close cooperation of emperor and patriarch.

A teaching, strongly supported in the East, held that Christ had no human will. Twice emperors had officially favored this position, Heraclius by publishing a formula of faith and Constans II by silencing the issue of one or two wills in Christ.

Shortly after assuming the office of the papacy (which he did without first being confirmed by the emperor), Martin held a council at the Lateran in which the imperial documents were censured, and in which the patriarch of Constantinople and two of his predecessors were condemned. Constans II, in response, tried first to turn bishops and people against the pope.

Failing in this and in an attempt to kill the pope, the emperor sent troops to Rome to seize Martin and to bring him back to Constantinople. Already in poor health, Martin offered no resistance, returned with the exarch Calliopas and was then submitted to various imprisonments, tortures and hardships. Although condemned to death and with some of the torture imposed already carried out, Martin was saved from execution by the pleas of a repentant Paul, patriarch of Constantinople, who was himself gravely ill.

Martin died shortly thereafter, tortures and cruel treatment having taken their toll. He is the last of the early popes to be venerated as a martyr.

Comment:

The real significance of the word martyr comes not from the dying but from the witnessing, which the word means in its derivation. People who are willing to give up everything, their most precious possessions, their very lives, put a supreme value on the cause or belief for which they sacrifice. Martyrdom, dying for the faith, is an incidental extreme to which some have had to go to manifest their belief in Christ. A living faith, a life that exemplifies Christ’s teaching throughout, and that in spite of difficulties, is required of all Christians. Martin might have cut corners as a way of easing his lot, to  make some accommodations with the civil rulers.

Quote:

The breviary of the Orthodox Church pays tribute to Martin: “Glorious definer of the Orthodox Faith…sacred chief of divine dogmas, unstained by error…true reprover of heresy…foundation of bishops, pillar of the Orthodox faith, teacher of religion…. Thou didst adorn the divine see of Peter, and since from this divine Rock, thou didst immovably defend the Church, so now thou art glorified with him.”

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Vatican Radio: Fifth Sermon for Lent: St Gregory the Great on understanding scripture


Fifth Sermon for Lent: St Gregory the Great on understanding scripture


(Vatican Radio) Below please find the complete text of the fifth sermon for Lent delievered by Fr. Raniero Cantalamessa, OFMCAP, Preacher to the Papal Household delivered Friday April 11, 2014:

In our attempt to place ourselves under the teaching of the Fathers to give a new impetus and depth to our faith, we cannot omit a reflection on their way of reading the Word of God. It will be Pope St. Gregory the Great who will guide us to the “spiritual understanding” of the Scriptures and a renewed love for them. 
The same thing happened to Scripture in the modern world that happened to the person of Jesus. The quest for the exclusively historical and literal sense of the Bible, based on the same presuppositions that dominated during the last two centuries, led to results similar to those in the quest for a historical Jesus opposed to the Christ of faith. Jesus was reduced to being an extraordinary man, a great religious reformer, but nothing more. >>>>>>>>>>More

[Text from page http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2014/04/11/fifth_sermon_for_lent:_st_gregory_the_great_on_understanding_scripture/en1-789841
of the Vatican Radio website ]
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QUOTATION: Samuel Taylor Coleridge


Talent, lying in the understanding, is often inherited; genius, being the action of reason or imagination, rarely or never.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Discuss

 

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TODAY’S SAINT ST. DANIEL


Image of St. Daniel

St. Daniel

Died in 309, He and four companions, Elias, Isaias, Jeremy and Samuel were Egyptians who visited Christians condemned to work in the mines of Cilicia during Maximus persecution, to comfort them. … continue reading

 

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ARTICLE: SUMMA THEOLOGICA


Summa Theologica

Summa Theologica was the first Christian attempt at a comprehensive theological system. Written by Thomas Aquinas—a 13th-century philosopher and a principal saint of the Catholic Church—it is a compendium of all the main teachings of the Church for the “instruction of beginners.” It addresses a range of topics including God, the creation of the world, morality, and the life of Christ. Though incomplete,Summa Theologica is Aquinas’s most important work. About how many pages is it? More… Discuss

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: La Prière (avec ça signification Chretienne)- Georges Brassens (1965)



À l’émission “Douce France“, le 4 janvier 1965.
Un poème de Francis Jammes:  Great Compositions/Performances:
La Prière – Georges Brassens (1965)

LA PRIÈRE
Mélodie
Brassens a utilisé deux fois la même mélodie, d’abord sur le poème d’AragonIl n’y a pas d’amour heureux, puis sur celui de Francis Jammes, La prière.
Il s’en est expliqué dans une interview où il raconte qu’au XIXème siècle circulaient des mélodies de base (un peu comme pour le blues en jazz) sur lesquels les chanteurs pouvaient faire coller les paroles qu’ils avaient composées. Ces mélodies passe-partout s’appelaient des “timbres”. 
Les timbres ont été utilisés jusque dans les années 50 en France, notamment par les chansonniers du Grenier de Montmartre (sur Paris Inter) qui écrivaient ou même improvisaient des couplets d’actualité sur des airs standards, dont le public reprenait les refrains. 
Mais voyant que ce qu’il avait cherché à ressusciter était mal compris, (“Qui c’est ce flemmard qui nous sert deux chansons sur le même air?”) Brassens ne renouvela pas l’expérience.
[contact auteur : Henri T.] – [compléter cette analyse]
Complément
Maxime Le Forestier a fait remarquer l’ironie de cette situation: les deux seuls textes que Brassens a dotés d’une même musique sont l’un du très communiste Aragon et l’autre du très catholique Francis Jammes.
[contact auteur : Didier Bergeret]
Calvaire
A l’origine, le poème de Francis Jammes Les mystères douloureux(1905), comportait 5 couplets :
1- Agonie
2- Flagellation
3- Couronnement d’épines (supprimé par G.B.)
4- Portement de croix
5- Crucifiement
Dans le 3) (Couronnement d’épines), F. Jammes réfléchissait sur son sort de poète et cherchait vers le Christ son inspiration. 
“Par le poète dont saigne le front qui est ceint des ronces des désirs que jamais il n’atteint : Je vous salue, Marie
Il faut savoir que Jammes était résolument chrétien, particulièrement en 1905, où il s’était de nouveau adonné à la pratique religieuse. Il est intéressant de remarquer que GB, loin d’être un fervent catholique, a néanmoins choisi de chanter une prière particulièrement pieuse.
Le couplet “Invention de Notre Seigneur au Temple”, est écrit quant à lui par GB en personne. Ce titre est probablement choisi pour indiquer que ce couplet est une contribution de GB au poème. Contribution assez ironique toutefois, puisque GB se compare à “Notre Seigneur” (sous-entendu le Christ). De la même façon que Jammes comparait son travail de souffrance dans le 3e couplet à celui du Christ. Ainsi, GB se moquerait-il de F.J. dans cet ultime couplet, répondant sous des accents christiques aux implorations de F.J. ?
[contact auteur : Damien V.] – [compléter cette analyse]
Complément
Dans son recueil L’église habitée de feuilles (1906), que je n’ai pas sous la main, Francis Jammes illustre les Avé Maria (faut vérifier si tous les 150) et les 15 mystères (= moments de la vie de Jésus) de la prière du Rosaire. Ces mystères sont:
Les Mystères joyeux :
Annonciation – Visitation – Nativité – Purification – Jésus retrouvé au Temple.
Les Mystères douloureux :
Agonie – Flagellation – Couronnement d’épines – Portement de croix – Mort du Christ en croix.
Les Mystères glorieux :
Résurrection – Ascension – Pentecôte – Assomption – Couronnement de la Vierge.
En 2002, Jean-Paul II y a ajouté les Mystères lumineux :
Baptême du Seigneur – Noces de Cana – Annonce du Royaume – Transfiguration – Institution de l’Eucharistie.
[contact auteur : Ralf Tauchmann]
01Par le petit garçon qui meurt près de sa mère
02Tandis que des enfants s’amusent au parterre ;
03Et par l’oiseau blessé qui ne sait pas comment
04Son aile tout à coup s’ensanglante et descend
05Par la soif et la faim et le délire ardent:
06Je vous salue, Marie
 
07Par les gosses battus par l’ivrogne qui rentre,
08Par l’âne qui reçoit des coups de pied au ventre
09Et par l’humiliation de l’innocent châtié,
10Par la vierge vendue qu’on a déshabillée,
11Par le fils dont la mère a été insultée:
12Je vous salue, Marie
 
13Par la vieille qui, trébuchant sous trop de poids,
14S’écrie : “mon Dieu ! “, par le malheureux dont les bras
15Ne purent s’appuyer sur une amour humaine
16Comme la Croix du Fils sur Simon de Cyrène
Référence à la Passion
Référence à l’Evangile selon Saint Matthieu chapitre 27, verset 32 et l’Evangile selon Saint Marc 15, 21. 
Pendant le Chemin de Croix, les soldats réquisitionnent un homme revenu des champs, Simon de Cyrène, pour porter la Croix du Christ, qui est à bout de forces. Le Fils est une référence à l’expression “Le Fils de l’homme”, par laquelle Jésus se définit lui-même. Le Christ est également le Fils de Dieu.
On connaît le caractère anticlérical de certaines chansons de Brassens, voire franchement sacrilège sur la fin de sa vie, mais cette prière de Jammes est touchante par sa sincérité et par les images qu’elle évoque.
[contact auteur : Alexandre T.] – [compléter cette analyse]
17Par le cheval tombé sous le chariot qu’il traîne:
Le service de publication est momentanément désactivé, sans doute à cause d’une trop longue liste d’analyses en attente de modération.
Merci de votre compréhension.
18Je vous salue, Marie
 
19Par les quatre horizons qui crucifient le monde,
20Par tous ceux dont la chair se déchire ou succombe,
21Par ceux qui sont sans pieds, par ceux qui sont sans mains,
22Par le malade que l’on opère et qui geint
23Et par le juste mis au rang des assassins:
24Je vous salue, Marie
 
25Par la mère apprenant que son fils est guéri,
Dernier couplet
Ce couplet est la note personnelle de GB. Voilà qu’en un air de musique, GB arrive à détourner l’idée originale du texte de F.J.
F. Jammes, qui cherchait dans la souffrance du monde et celle du Christ une réponse à ses propres tourments, se voit répondre par GB dans ce dernier couplet.
GB prend ici le contrepied de la démarche de FJ : ce dernier pointait la misère du monde, telle qu’a été la souffrance de Jésus. GB quant à lui met en avant le bonheur retrouvé. En signant lui aussi le couplet par un ave maria, GB signifie ainsi que la souffrance n’est qu’une invention divine pour glorifier le message de Dieu. Dieu ne prend que pour mieux redonner, et inversement, il ne donne que pour mieux reprendre. L’étendue de son pouvoir n’est donc que virtuelle, est bonne à duper que les imbéciles.
[contact auteur : Damien V.] – [compléter cette analyse]
Complément
Cette dernière strophe est tirée des Mystères Joyeux de F. Jammes qui, avec les Mystères douleureux et les Mystères glorieux, illustrent les mystères du Rosaire.
[contact auteur : Ralf Tauchmann]
26Par l’oiseau rappelant l’oiseau tombé du nid,
27Par l’herbe qui a soif et recueille l’ondée,
28Par le baiser perdu par l’amour redonné,
29Et par le mendiant retrouvant sa monnaie :
30Je vous salue, Marie

 

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Saint of the Day for Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014: ST. VINCENT PALLOTTI


Saint of the Day for Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

 

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Gaudete, Christus est natus! (Rejoice Christ is Born!)


Gaudete, Christus est natus!

[Medieval Christmas Hymn, from an anonymous author.
Performed by the Swedish ensemble Joculatores Upsalienses]

Christmas 2011 @ Chijmes — Part 1- 7. Do You Hear What I Hear – Noel Regney and Gloria Shayne



Christmas Concert 2011 by Cathedral Choir of the Risen Christ @ Chijmes, Singapore

 

Frederick Delius: Brigg Fair by Sir Charles Mackerras



Frederick Delius (1862-1934)

Brigg Fair“, an “English rhapsody” (1907)

Orchestra of the Welsh National Opera
by Sir Charles Mackerras
1990

 

“Christe, Qui Lux Est et Dies” by Byrd, translated with lyrics



Here’s another piece from 16th century English composer William Byrd, titled “Christe, Qui Lux Es et Dies” or “Christ, Who Art the Light and the Day,” with lyrics, performed by Stile Antico in 2007, and loosely translated by me. This video is from my blog, When Suffering Doesn’t Stop: Life with Chronic Pain at http://life-incessant.blogspot.com/.

 

The Truth Behind – The Truth Behind the Devil’s Bible (from National Gegraphic Channel)



 http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/the-truth-behind/ Allegedly made from the skins of 160 donkeys, the Codex Gigas is the world’s largest and most mysterious medieval manuscript.