Tag Archives: civil rights movement

Martin Luther King, Jr.: (Image: National Archives)



Martin Luther King, Jr.
Martin Luther King, Jr., eloquent African-American Baptist minister and leader of the civil rights movement from the mid-1950s, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, on January 15, 1929. Dr. King began his involvement in the civil rights movement in 1955 with his leadership of the Montgomery bus boycott, which ended segregated seating on city buses. Adopting Mohandas K. Gandhi‘s principles of nonviolence, King led demonstrations, sit-ins and boycotts in cities throughout the South to show the injustice of racist policies. He explained his belief in nonviolence in a letter written during one of his many incarcerations: ‘Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue. It seeks so to dramatize the issue that it can no longer be ignored….’ King’s efforts helped to bring about the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964. Dr. King’s leadership of the civil rights movement brought many threats against his life and on April 4, 1968, he was killed by a sniper’s bullet in Memphis, Tennessee. Martin Luther King Day was established by President Ronald Reagan in 1986, for the third Monday in January.

Image: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.ubXxEI4E.dpuf

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this day in the yesteryear: Rosa Parks Refuses to Give Up Her Seat (1955)


Rosa Parks Refuses to Give Up Her Seat (1955)

Dubbed the “Mother of the Modern-Day Civil Rights Movement” by the US Congress, Rosa Parks was an African-American civil rights activist who became famous in 1955 for refusing to vacate her seat on a municipal bus for a white man. This act of civil disobedience sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which launched Martin Luther King, Jr., into prominence and became one of the largest and most successful movements against racial segregation. How many thousands of commuters took part in the boycott? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: James Baldwin (1924)


James Baldwin (1924)

Baldwin was a groundbreaking African-American author best known for his novel Go Tell It on the Mountain. He wrote about social taboos such as racism and homosexuality at a time when mainstream literature largely ignored them. He grew up in poverty in the New York City district of Harlem and became a preacher while in his teens. In 1947, he left the US to live in Europe, and upon his return in 1957, he joined the civil rights movement. What famous author taught Baldwin in his youth? More… Discuss

TODAY BIRTHDAY: MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. (1929)


Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929)

King was the inspirational leader of the US Civil Rights Movement. An advocate of nonviolence, he organized boycotts, marches, and demonstrations to protest segregation and racial injustice. In August 1963, he spearheaded the March on Washington, an assembly of more than 200,000 protesters at which he made his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. King’s work helped to assure the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, but he was killed just four years later in Memphis, Tennessee. Why was he there? More… Discuss

 

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This Day in the Yesteryear: NASHVILLE SIT-INS BEGIN (1960)


English: Locations of sit-in demostrations in ...

English: Locations of sit-in demostrations in Nashville, Tennessee, February to May 1960. S. H. Kress – 237 5th Ave. N. McLellans – 229 5th Ave. N. Woolworths – 221 5th Ave. N. Harveys – 518 Church St. Walgreens – 226 5th Ave. N. W. T. Grant – 601 Church St. Cain-Sloan – 5th Ave. N. and Church St. Greyhound – 517 Commerce (6th Ave. N. and Commerce) Trailways Bus Center – 113 6th Ave. N. Moon-McGrath Drug Store – 323 Union St. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Just before it became first major Southern US city to begin integrating public spaces, Nashville was the scene of a months-long peaceful protest at the lunch counters of the city’s department stores. Scores of African-American college students calmly occupied seats at the counters while employees refused to serve them. Some protesters were assaulted or jailed. That May, the counters were desegregated. The protesters’ code of conduct became a model for other demonstrations. What did it say? More… Discuss