Tag Archives: cliff eisen

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat, K. 595 (make music part of your life series)


Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat, K. 595

The Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat major, K. 595, is a concertante work by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, for piano and orchestra. It is the last piano concerto he wrote. The manuscript is dated 5 January 1791. However, Alan Tyson’s analysis of the paper on which Mozart composed the work indicated that Mozart used this paper between December 1787 and February 1789, which implies composition well before 1791. Simon Keefe has written that the composition of the work dates from 1788. By contrast, Wolfgang Rehm has stated that Mozart composed this concerto in late 1790 and early 1791. Cliff Eisen has discussed the controversy over the time of composition in his review of the published facsimile of the score. The work followed by some years the series of highly successful concertos Mozart wrote for his own concerts, and by the time of its premiere Mozart was no longer so prominent a performer on the public stage. The concerto may have been first performed at a concert on 4 March 1791 in Jahn’s Hall by Mozart and by a clarinetist Joseph Bähr. If so, this was Mozart’s last appearance in a public concert, as he took ill in September 1791 and died on 5 December 1791. Another possibility is that it was premiered by Mozart’s pupil Barbara Ployer on the occasion of a public concert at the Auersperg palace in January 1791. The work is scored for flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, solo piano and strings, which makes it thinner than Mozart’s other late concertos, all of which except for No. 23 have trumpet and timpani.
It has the following three movements:

1. Allegro
2. Larghetto in E-flat major
3. Allegro
Although all three movements are in a major key, minor keys are suggested, as is evident from the second theme of the first movement (in the dominant minor), as well as the presence of a remote minor key in the early development of that movement and of the tonic minor in the middle of the Larghetto.
Another interesting characteristic of the work is its rather strong thematic integration of the movements, which would become ever more important in the nineteenth century. The principal theme of the Larghetto, for instance, is revived as the second theme of the final movement (in the 65th measure). The principal theme for finale was also used in Mozart’s song “Sehnsucht nach dem Frühling” (also called “Komm, lieber Mai”) , K. 596, which immediately follows this concerto in the Köchel catalogue.
Mozart wrote down his cadenzas for the first and third movements.
Simon Keefe has discussed the concerto in detail, with emphasis on the distinctive character and experiments in style of the concerto compared to Mozart’s other concerti in this genre.
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
—————————————-­———————————
NOTE: I do not know who the performers of this are, nor the place and date of recording!!! Any suggestions are welcome.
—————————————-­—————————————
ENJOY!!!! 😀

Mozart Piano Concerto 16 (1/3) Allegro Assai



The Piano Concerto No. 16 in D Major, KV. 451 is a concertante work for piano, or pianoforte, and orchestra by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Mozart composed the concerto for performance at a series of concerts at the Vienna venues of the Trattnerhof and the Burgtheater in the first quarter of 1784, where he was himself the soloist.[1] Mozart noted this concerto as complete on 22 March 1784 in his catalog, and performed the work later that month. Cliff Eisen has postulated that this performance was on 31 March 1784

The work is orchestrated for solo piano, flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. The concerto is in three movements: 1. Allegro assai
2. Andante in G major
3. Allegro di molto

Simon Keefe has noted contemporary comments from Mozart’s era on how the woodwind writing in this concerto showed a “newly intricate and sophisticated” character compared to Mozart’s prior keyboard concerti.[1] M.S. Cole has noted Mozart’s use of meter changes in the coda of the finale, starting at measure 315, from 2/4 to 3/8, and subsequent thematic transformations.[3] Joel Galand has noted that the finale, in rondo/ritornello form, avoids use of a new re-entry theme

 

Mozart Piano Concerto 16 (2/3) Allegro Assai – Andante in G major – Allegro di molto (Rondo)





Word from ‘ s youtube Channel:  “The Piano Concerto No. 16 in D Major, KV. 451 is a concertante work for piano, or pianoforte, and orchestra by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Mozart composed the concerto for performance at a series of concerts at the Vienna venues of the Trattnerhof and the Burgtheater in the first quarter of 1784, where he was himself the soloist.[1] Mozart noted this concerto as complete on 22 March 1784 in his catalog, and performed the work later that month. Cliff Eisen has postulated that this performance was on 31 March 1784

The work is orchestrated for solo piano, flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. The concerto is in three movements: 1. Allegro assai
2. Andante in G major
3. Allegro di molto

Simon Keefe has noted contemporary comments from Mozart’s era on how the woodwind writing in this concerto showed a “newly intricate and sophisticated” character compared to Mozart’s prior keyboard concerti.[1] M.S. Cole has noted Mozart’s use of meter changes in the coda of the finale, starting at measure 315, from 2/4 to 3/8, and subsequent thematic transformations.[3] Joel Galand has noted that the finale, in rondo/ritornello form, avoids use of a new re-entry theme”