Tag Archives: Cluj-Napoca

Archaeology Volunteering in Romania: Volunteer in Romania


In Romania, volunteers on the Archaeology project are based in various locations, although the main base will be Deva, a city with 80,000 inhabitants. In ancient times Deva was a Dacian fortress called Decidava. Nowadays, it is the capital city of the Hunedoara district, an area with an extensive and fascinating history.

Volunteers work with a number of archaeological groups, including Romania’s Museum of History where they investigate ancient Dacia and the medieval environs of Transylvania. Archaeological sites found in the Carpathian Mountains and plains below have already yielded some remarkable information about the time of the infamous Vlad-the-Impaler, the supposed inspiration for the Dracula legend.

Our Archaeology placements are a great way to learn about civilisations that have long-since disappeared. Through clues, investigations and practical research you can attempt to reconstruct many aspects of their way of life whilst collaborating with some of the best specialists in the periods from Neolithic to Medieval

via Archaeology Volunteering in Romania: Volunteer in Romania.

Robert Schumann : Arabesque Op.18 in C Major, Piano – Thurzo Zoltan: make music part of your life series


Robert Schumann : Arabesque Op.18 in C Major

Robert Schumann : Arabesque Op.18 in C Major
Piano – Thurzo Zoltan
Recorded at the Partium University – Oradea -Romania
Video Mastering : Balajti Robert

from Wikipedia:


Oradea, mai demult Oradea
Mare, (în maghiară Nagyvárad, în germană Großwardein, în idiș גרויסווארדיין Groysvardeyn, în latină Magnovaradinum

Folclor Nepieritor, Dumitru Fărcaş – Învârtita ca-n Ardeal (Transyvanian Dance)


 It is possible that instruments from both traditions were combined into one entity. The tárogató has a Persian origin, and it appeared in Hungary during the Turkish wars.[2] Up to about the 18th century, the tárogató was a type of shawm, with a double reed, conical bore, and no keys.

Being a very loud and raucous instrument, the tárogató was used as a signaling instrument in battle (like the bugle or the bagpipe).[1]

Because the tárogató was an iconic instrument of the Rákóczi’s War for Independence (1703–1711). Its use was suppressed in the 18th century by the Habsburg monarchy.[1][2] The instrument was eventually abandoned being considered too loud for a concert hall.[2]

Modern usage

Dumitru Dobrican, a taragot folk musician from Dăntăuşii din Groşi, Romania.

In the 1890s a modern version was invented by Vencel József Schunda, a Budapest instrument maker.[2] It uses a single reed, like a clarinet or saxophone, and has a conical bore, similar to the saxophone. The instrument is made of wood, usually black grenadilla wood like a clarinet. The most common size, the soprano tárogató in B♭, is about 29 inches (74 cm) in length and has a mournful sound similar to a cross between an English horn and a soprano saxophone. Other sizes exist; one maker, János Stowasser, advertised a family of seven sizes of which the largest was a contrabass tárogató in E♭.[1] The new tárogató bears very little resemblance with the historical tárogató and the two instruments should not be confused.[1][3] It has been suggested that the name schundaphone would have been more accurate, but tárogató was used because of the nationalistic image that the original instrument had.[4]

This instrument was a symbol of Hungarian aristocracy, and the favorite woodwind instrument of Governor Miklós Horthy.
(Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taragot)

Victor Babeș (1854-1926): Babesiosis


Victor Babeș

Victor Babeș
Born 4 July 1854
19 October 1926
Nationality Romanian
Occupation bacteriologists
Known for rabies
leprosy
diphtheria
tuberculosis
infectious diseases

Victor Babeș (4 July 1854 – 19 October 1926) was a Romanian physician, biologist, and one of the earliest bacteriologists. He made early and significant contributions to the study of rabies, leprosy, diphtheria, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases.

The Romanian universities Babeș-Bolyai in Cluj-Napoca and the University of Medicine and Pharmacy in Timişoara bear his name.

In 1885 he discovered a parasitic sporozoan of the ticks, named Babesia (of the genus Babesiidae), and which causes a rare and severe disease called babesiosis. In the same year, he published the first treatise of bacteriology in the world, Bacteria and their role in the histopathology of infectious diseases, which he co-authored with Cornil.  (sourse: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Babe%C5%9F)