Tag Archives: Cold War

this day in the yesteryear: Soviet Union Lifts Blockade of Berlin (1949)


Soviet Union Lifts Blockade of Berlin (1949)

One of the first major crises of the Cold War, the Berlin blockade began in June 1948 during the multinational occupation of post-WWII Germany. In an attempt to force its former wartime allies—the US, the UK, and France—out of Berlin, the USSR began a blockade of all rail, road, and water traffic through East Germany to West Berlin. Rather than withdraw, the Western powers bypassed the blockade by airlifting thousands of tons of supplies into the city each day. What was Operation Little Vittles? More… Discuss

Dvorak : Symphony No.1 in C Minor, “The Bells of Zlonice” , great compositions/performances


Dvorak : Symphony No.1 in C Minor, “The Bells of Zlonice”

Alfred Eisenstaedt—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images Mother and child in Hiroshima, Japan, December 1945


Alfred Eisenstaedt—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images Mother and child in Hiroshima, Japan, December 1945 Read more: Hiroshima: Portrait of a Mother and Child in an Atomic Wasteland, 1945 | ( Click to access story) LIFE.com http://life.time.com/history/wasteland-mother-and-child-hiroshima-1945/#ixzz3PwqnNLSp

Alfred Eisenstaedt
’40s

“Japanese doctors said that those who had been killed by the blast itself died instantly. But presently, according to these doctors, those who had suffered only small burns found their appetite failing, their hair falling out, their gums bleeding. They developed temperatures of 104, vomited blood, and died. . . . Last week the Japanese announced that the count of Hiroshima’s dead had risen to 125,000.” — From “What Ended the War,” LIFE magazine, Sept. 17, 1945

Four months after the American B-29 Superfortress Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945, killing roughly 70,000 men, women and children outright and dooming tens of thousands more to either a torturous recovery or a slow death by radiation poisoning, burns or other injuries and afflictions, Alfred Eisenstaedt made this portrait of a Japanese mother and her child amid the ruins of the city.

Beyond the eternal debate about the “morality” of the bombing of Hiroshima and, two days later, Nagasaki; beyond the political and scientific factors that led to the development of nuclear weapons in the first place; beyond the lingering shadow cast by the Atomic Age and the Cold War—beyond all of those considerations, Eisenstaedt’s picture quietly commands us, at the very least, to pay attention.

 

this day in the yesteryear: First Serving Female British MP Elected (1919)


First Serving Female British MP Elected (1919)

American-born Nancy Witcher Astor, or Viscountess Astor, was the second woman elected to the British Parliament‘s House of Commons and the first to actually serve. She concentrated on women’s issues, temperance, and child welfare and was reelected many times, serving until 1945. Astor attracted a great deal of attention, much of it for her caustic and witty comments. She reportedly once said to Winston Churchill, “If you were my husband, I’d poison your tea!” What was his alleged response? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Kennedy Confirms Missile Presence in Cuba (1962)


 

English: Medium Range Ballistic Missile Launch...

English: Medium Range Ballistic Missile Launch Site 1, San Cristobal, Cuba 25 October 1962 (MRBM Launch Site 1) – Cuban missile crisis (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Kennedy Confirms Missile Presence in Cuba (1962)

 

The Cuban Missile Crisis was a major Cold War confrontation that began when US reconnaissance flights uncovered Soviet missile sites in Cuba. President John F. Kennedy denounced the Soviet actions, imposed a naval blockade on Cuba, and vowed that the US would retaliate against any missile launched from Cuba. After hovering on the brink of war for several days, the two superpowers were able to reach a compromise. From which countries did the Soviets demand the withdrawal of American missiles? More… Discuss

This high-quality version of President Kennedy’s 10/22/62 Cuban Missile Crisis speech is somewhat rare, because it is complete and unedited. Usually only small bits and pieces of the speech are presented on television and in documentaries. But this is the entire 18-minute address from start to finish.

VIDEO SOURCE (NARA):
http://Amazon.com/dp/B000UWKJ0E

DOWNLOAD LINKS:
http://Archive.org/details/gov.archiv…

RELATED PROGRAM:
http://DVP-Potpourri.blogspot.com/201…

 

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: POST-WAR JAPANESE CONSTITUTION GOES INTO EFFECT (1947)


Post-War Japanese Constitution Goes into Effect (1947)

The Constitution of Japan was drawn up under the Allied occupation that followed World War II. It replaced Japan‘s previous imperial system with a form of liberal democracy, which provides for a parliamentary system of government and guarantees human rights. Under its terms, Japan renounces the right to wage war, and the emperor exercises a purely ceremonial role, with the prime minister acting as the head of government. What amendments have been made to the constitution since its adoption? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: HARRY TRUMAN BECOMES 33RD PRESIDENT OF THE US (1945)


Harry Truman Becomes 33rd President of the US (1945)

Truman was the 33rd president of the US. He is remembered for authorizing the use of atomic bombs against Japan and for his opposition to Communism. A Democrat who largely accepted the New Deal tradition, he presided over victory in World War II and the Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe. His administration also oversaw the beginning of the Cold War and the desegregation of the US armed forces. What famous headline ran in the Chicago Tribune the day after Truman won his second term? More… Discuss

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This Day in the Yesteryear: SOVIET EMBASSY CIPHER CLERK IGOR GOUZENKO DEFECTS TO CANADA (1945)


Soviet Embassy Cipher Clerk Igor Gouzenko Defects to Canada (1945)

Considered by some to be the first major international event of the Cold War, the defection of Soviet cipher clerk Igor Gouzenko radically transformed the way the West regarded and approached Soviet espionage. The authorities at first dismissed Gouzenko’s reports of Stalin’s efforts to steal nuclear secrets and of Soviet spy rings operating in Canada and the US, but he soon convinced them of the truth behind his allegations. The information he revealed helped lead to the apprehension of whom? More…Discuss

 

NO MAN’S LAND


No Man’s Land

No man’s land is territory whose ownership is unclear or under dispute and is often unoccupied. The term—then spelled “nonesmanneslond”—was likely first used in medieval Europe to describe a contested territory or refuse dumping ground between fiefdoms. During WWI, it was used to refer to the land between enemy trenches too dangerous to occupy, and during the Cold War, it became associated with territories near the Iron Curtain. What stretch of no man’s land is known as the “Cactus Curtain“? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: U-2 CRISIS OF 1960 BEGINS (1960) It’s proven fact that humans behave better when they try to portray themselves as being better!


U-2 Crisis of 1960 Begins (1960)

After becoming Soviet premier in 1958, Nikita Khrushchev asserted a doctrine of peaceful coexistence with capitalist nations. He toured the US in 1959 and planned a Paris summit with the US, Britain, and France in 1960, but in May of that year, an American U-2 reconnaissance plane was shot down over the Soviet Union. Khrushchev cancelled the conference, and the American pilot, F. Gary Powers, was tried in the Soviet Union and sentenced to 10 years in prison. What happened to him? More… Discuss

This Day in History (August 3rd): US Senate Ratifies the Antiballistic Missile Treaty (1972)


US Senate Ratifies the Antiballistic Missile Treaty (1972)

The Antiballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty of 1972 limited the number of defensive antiballistic missile systems allowed to the US and USSR. Effective ABM systems had been sought since the Cold War, when the nuclear arms race raised the specter of complete destruction by unstoppable ballistic missiles. In the West, the treaty was seen as a deterrent to nuclear war, since neither side would be able to fully protect against nuclear attack. Why then did the US withdraw from the treaty in 2002? More… Discuss