Tag Archives: Colorado

The Ascension. Benjamin West. 1801. Denver Art Museum, Colorado, United States.


The Ascension. Benjamin West. 1801. Denver Art Museum, Colorado, United States.

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The Ascension. Benjamin West. 1801. Denver Art Museum, Colorado, United States.

From a sermon by Saint Augustine, bishop
(Sermo de Ascensione Domini, Mai 98, 1-2: PLS 2, 494-495)

“No one has ever ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven”

Today our Lord Jesus Christ ascended into heaven; let our hearts ascend with him. […] For just as he remained with us even after his ascension, so we too are already in heaven with him, even though what is promised us has not yet been fulfilled in our bodies. […]

While in heaven he is also with us; and we while on earth are with him. He is here with us by his divinity, his power and his love. We cannot be in heaven, as he is on earth, by divinity, but in him, we can be there by love.

He did not leave heaven when he came down to us; nor did he withdraw from us when he went up again into heaven. The fact that he was in heaven even while he was on earth is borne out by his own statement: No one has ever ascended into heaven except the one who descended from heaven, the Son of Man, who is in heaven. […]

These words are explained by our oneness with Christ, for he is our head and we are his body. No one ascended into heaven except Christ because we also are Christ: he is the Son of Man by his union with us, and we by our union with him are the sons of God. So the Apostle says: Just as the human body, which has many members, is a unity, because all the different members make one body, so is it also with Christ. He too has many members, but one body.

The Ascension. Benjamin West. 1801. Denver Art Museum, Colorado, United States.

The Black Death


The Black Death

The Black Death was a form of bubonic plague

The bubonic plague described by Athanasius Kircher

The bubonic plague described by Athanasius Kircher (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

that was pandemic throughout Europe, the Middle East, and much of Asia in the 14th century. Thought to have been caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, it killed between one-third and half of Europe’s population and at least 75 million people worldwide. Recently, it has been argued that the Black Death was not caused by bubonic plague, at all, but by what? More… Discuss

Ethics, Environmental, Health: IS YOUR RIGHT TO KNOW ENOUGH? Effects of Feeding GMO Potatoes To Rats (Pt. 1)


Effects of Feeding GMO Potatoes To Rats (Pt. 1)

Béla Bartók – Rhapsody No.1 for Violin and Orchestra: make music part of your life series


Béla Bartók – Rhapsody No.1 for Violin and Orchestra

this pressed – for information: CDC running twofold probe of EV-D68 cases, neuro illnesses | CIDRAP


While the nationwide outbreak of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) cases may be starting to subside, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is still in the early stages of investigating it and determining whether it’s connected to unexplained neurologic illnesses in children in Colorado and elsewhere, says a top CDC virology expert.

Today the count of confirmed cases rose by 13, to 691, according to the CDC. The illnesses have been confirmed in all but four states: Alaska, Hawaii, Nevada, and Arizona. The cases confirmed yesterday and today mark a slowdown from earlier this week and much of last week.

“We’re getting a sense that on average there’s at least an indication of a decline in the number of cases,” Mark Pallansch, PhD, director of the CDC’s Division of Viral Diseases, told CIDRAP News today.

via CDC running twofold probe of EV-D68 cases, neuro illnesses | CIDRAP.

this pressed-for information: 12 states confirm Enterovirus D68 cases|CNN


http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/16/health/enterovirus-outbreak/

Watch this video

click to access site and play the video.

(CNN) — Since mid-August, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed more than 100 cases of Enterovirus D68 in 12 states: Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Montana, New York and Oklahoma.

Yet the real number of severe respiratory illnesses caused by this virus is probably even higher, the CDC says.

Enteroviruses are very common, especially in the early fall. The CDC estimates that 10 million to 15 million infections occur in the United States each year. These viruses usually present like the common cold; symptoms include sneezing, a runny nose and a cough.

Most people recover without any treatment. But Enterovirus D68 appears to be exacerbating breathing problems in children who have asthma.

What parents should know

The virus is hard to track, as many enteroviruses cause similar symptoms and hospitals generally do not test for specific types. But the CDC has asked hospitals across the country to send in samples if workers suspect that Enterovirus D68 has caused a patient’s severe respiratory illness.

Alabama, Indiana and Oklahoma are the latest to join the growing list of states with confirmed cases, health officials say.

Seven of 24 specimens sent to the CDC from Oklahoma hospitals and laboratories have tested positive for Enterovirus D68, the Oklahoma State Department of Health announced Tuesday. The state has seen an increase in pediatric admissions at hospitals in its central region.

Watch this video

So why all the concern now?

What’s unusual at the moment is the high number of hospitalizations.

The virus has sent more than 30 children a day to a Kansas City, Missouri, hospital, where about 15% of the youngsters were placed in intensive care, officials said.

“It’s worse in terms of scope of critically ill children who require intensive care. I would call it unprecedented,” said Dr. Mary Anne Jackson, a director for infectious diseases at Children’s Mercy Hospital, where about 475 children were recently treated.

“I’ve practiced for 30 years in pediatrics, and I’ve never seen anything quite like this,” she said.

What parents should know about EV-D68

What’s special about this particular type of enterovirus?

An analysis by the CDC showed at least 30 of the Kansas City children tested positive for EV-D68, Missouri health officials said.

It’s a type of enterovirus that’s uncommon, but not new.

It was first identified in the 1960s and there have been fewer than 100 reported cases since that time. But it’s possible, Pallansch said, that the relatively low number of reports might be because EV-D68 is hard to identify.

EV-D68 was seen last year in the United States and this year in various parts of the world. Over the years, clusters have been reported in Georgia, Pennsylvania, Arizona and various countries including the Philippines, Japan and the Netherlands.

Experts say they don’t know why it’s flared up this time around.

“Why one virus or another crops up in one part of the country or another part of the country from one year to the next is inexplicable,” said William Schaffner, head of the Department of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University. “It’s a mystery to me.”

What are the symptoms?

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Another post (this pressed will follow shortly): get informed, be your family and yourselves best friends, no matter what the downplayer may want you to believe; then you can be level headed instead of fearing, and in denial!

this pressed: Thousands of undocumented immigrants skipped mandated follow-up appointments



Thousands of undocumented immigrants skipped mandated follow-up appointments

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today’s birthday: Jack Dempsey (1895)


Jack Dempsey (1895)

Born in Manassa, Colorado, Dempsey was an American boxer and world heavyweight champion. Nicknamed the “Manassa Mauler,” he emerged from fights on saloon floors to seal his slugging reputation in his first title fight by knocking down the gigantic champion, Jess Willard, seven times in the first three minutes. He successfully defended his title five times before losing to Gene Tunney in an upset. What happened during the rematch, and why did it come to be called the “Long Count” bout? More… Discuss

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: CHARLES GOODNIGHT (1836)


Charles Goodnight (1836)

Goodnight was a cattleman known as the father of the Texas Panhandle. As a young man, he joined the Texas Rangers and became a noted scout and Indian fighter. Eventually, he turned to ranching and cattle driving. In 1866, he and Oliver Loving laid out the Goodnight-Loving cattle trail that extended from Texas through New Mexico and Colorado and into Wyoming. He later cofounded the million-acre JA Ranch in Texas, where he crossed Angus cattle with buffalo to produce what animal? More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO IS SIGNED (1848)


The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo Is Signed (1848)

A border dispute sparked by the US annexation of Texas in 1845 soon led to all-out war between the two countries. Under the terms of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that ended the war, Mexico confirmed US claims to Texas and ceded lands constituting present-day California, Nevada, and Utah, and parts of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Wyoming in exchange for an indemnity of $15 million and US assumption of American claims against Mexico. How did the US’s victory precipitate its Civil War?More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: GRAND CANYON DESIGNATED A NATIONAL MONUMENT (1908)


Grand Canyon Designated a National Monument (1908)

Arizona’s Grand Canyon, the great gorge of the Colorado River, is one of the natural wonders of the world. The canyon reaches depths greater than 1 mile (1.6 km), and its multicolored rock layers and steep rims are renowned for their beauty. After visiting the Grand Canyon in 1903, US President Theodore Roosevelt—an avid conservationist—became a major proponent of its preservation and designated it a US National Monument on January 11, 1908. Who fought against his efforts? More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: John Filson about curiosty…(no,not cats’)


Curiosity is natural to the soul of man, and interesting objects have a powerful influence on our affections.

John Filson (1747-1788) Discuss