Tag Archives: Concerto

best classical music , T. G. Albinoni: Op. 9 n. 8 / Concerto for oboe, strings & b.c. in G minor / Alma Musica Amsterdam, great compositions/performances


T. G. Albinoni: Op. 9 n. 8 / Concerto for oboe, strings & b.c. in G minor / Alma Musica Amsterdam

 

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P. A. Locatelli: Op.7 n.4 / Concerto Grosso for Strings & b.c. in F major – Part 2 / Concerto Köln


P. A. Locatelli: Op.7 n.4 / Concerto grosso for strings & b.c. in F major – Part 2 / Concerto Köln

Felix Mendelssohn-Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25: great compositions/performances


Felix Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor,  Op. 25:

  1. Molto allegro con fuoco in G minor
  2. Andante in E major
  3. Presto—Molto allegro e vivace in G major

Chopin: Piano Concerto No. 1, in E minor, Op. 11 – Emil Gilels/Phylarmonia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy: Great compositons/performances


Chopin:  Piano Concerto No. 1,
in E minor,  Op. 11

Alessandro Marcello, Concerto in D minor for Oboe, Strings Orchestra and Continuo: make music part of your life series


Alessandro Marcello, Concerto in D minor for Oboe, Strings Orchestra and Continuo

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi: Sonata for Recorder in C major ‘Il Pastor Fido’ No.1, Op.13, (RV54): make music part of your life series


Antonio Lucio Vivaldi: Sonata for Recorder in C major ‘Il Pastor Fido‘ No.1, Op.13, (RV54)

FROM:
vivaldi369  vivaldi369
Álbum: Antonio Vivaldi: Sonatas for Flute, Op.13 “IL Pastor Fido”
Interpretes del álbum: Bela Drahos, Pal Kelemen & Zsuzsa Pertis
Compositor: Antonio Lucio Vivaldi
Año: 1991
Genero: Barroco Italiano
Movimientos: Moderato-Allegro-Affectuoso-Allegro-Giga

“Concerto in G Major for Two Flutes and Orchestra” by Domenico Cimarosa (1749-1801): make music part of your life series


Concerto in G Major for Two Flutes and Orchestra” by Domenico Cimarosa (1749-1801)

 FROM:

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat, K. 595 (make music part of your life series)


Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat, K. 595

The Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat major, K. 595, is a concertante work by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, for piano and orchestra. It is the last piano concerto he wrote. The manuscript is dated 5 January 1791. However, Alan Tyson’s analysis of the paper on which Mozart composed the work indicated that Mozart used this paper between December 1787 and February 1789, which implies composition well before 1791. Simon Keefe has written that the composition of the work dates from 1788. By contrast, Wolfgang Rehm has stated that Mozart composed this concerto in late 1790 and early 1791. Cliff Eisen has discussed the controversy over the time of composition in his review of the published facsimile of the score. The work followed by some years the series of highly successful concertos Mozart wrote for his own concerts, and by the time of its premiere Mozart was no longer so prominent a performer on the public stage. The concerto may have been first performed at a concert on 4 March 1791 in Jahn’s Hall by Mozart and by a clarinetist Joseph Bähr. If so, this was Mozart’s last appearance in a public concert, as he took ill in September 1791 and died on 5 December 1791. Another possibility is that it was premiered by Mozart’s pupil Barbara Ployer on the occasion of a public concert at the Auersperg palace in January 1791. The work is scored for flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, solo piano and strings, which makes it thinner than Mozart’s other late concertos, all of which except for No. 23 have trumpet and timpani.
It has the following three movements:

1. Allegro
2. Larghetto in E-flat major
3. Allegro
Although all three movements are in a major key, minor keys are suggested, as is evident from the second theme of the first movement (in the dominant minor), as well as the presence of a remote minor key in the early development of that movement and of the tonic minor in the middle of the Larghetto.
Another interesting characteristic of the work is its rather strong thematic integration of the movements, which would become ever more important in the nineteenth century. The principal theme of the Larghetto, for instance, is revived as the second theme of the final movement (in the 65th measure). The principal theme for finale was also used in Mozart’s song “Sehnsucht nach dem Frühling” (also called “Komm, lieber Mai”) , K. 596, which immediately follows this concerto in the Köchel catalogue.
Mozart wrote down his cadenzas for the first and third movements.
Simon Keefe has discussed the concerto in detail, with emphasis on the distinctive character and experiments in style of the concerto compared to Mozart’s other concerti in this genre.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
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NOTE: I do not know who the performers of this are, nor the place and date of recording!!! Any suggestions are welcome.
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ENJOY!!!! 😀

make music part of your life series: Antonio Vivaldi “L`amoroso” I Musici


[youtube.com/watch?v=9TbX59CAo64]

Concerto in E Major, RV 271 (PV 246)
“L´amoroso” by Antonio Vivaldi
Felix Ayo, violin
I Musici

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonin Dvorak – Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)


[youtube.com/watch?v=qP-ymoLlKMY]

Antonin Dvorak – Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)

Antonín Leopold Dvořák (September 8, 1841 — May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer. Following the nationalist example of Bedřich Smetana, Dvořák frequently employed features of the folk musics of Moravia and his native Bohemia (then parts of the Austrian Empire and now constituting the Czech Republic). Dvořák’s own style has been described as ‘the fullest recreation of a national idiom with that of the symphonic tradition, absorbing folk influences and finding effective ways of using them.’

Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)

1. Allegro agitato
2. Andante sostenuto (18:09)
3. Allegro con fuoco (26:21)

Rudolf Firkušný, piano and the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra conducted by Walter Susskind.

The Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in G minor, Op. 33, was the first of three concertos that Antonín Dvořák completed—it was followed by a violin concerto and then a cello concerto—and the piano concerto is probably the least known and least performed.

As the eminent music critic Harold Schonberg put it, Dvořák wrote “an attractive Piano Concerto in G minor with a rather ineffective piano part, a beautiful Violin Concerto in A minor, and a supreme Cello Concerto in B minor“.

(bartje11 totally disagrees with the eminent Harold Schonberg)

Dvořák composed his piano concerto from late August through 14 September 1876. Its autograph version contains many corrections, erasures, cuts and additions, the bulk of which were made in the piano part. The work was premiered in Prague on 24 March 1878, with the orchestra of the Prague Provisional Theatre conducted by Adolf Cech with the Czech pianist Karel Slavkovsky.

Dvořák himself realized that he had not created a piece in which the piano does battle with the orchestra, as it is not a virtuosic piece. As Dvořák wrote: “I see I am unable to write a Concerto for a virtuoso; I must think of other things.”
(bartje11: maybe not a work with obvious virtuoso fireworks, but still a very, very difficult piano part, not for the average pianist)

What Dvořák composed, instead, was a symphonic concerto in which the piano plays a leading part in the orchestra, rather than opposed to it.

In an effort to mitigate awkward passages and expand the pianist’s range of sonorities, the Czech pianist and pedagogue Vilém Kurz undertook an extensive re-writing of the solo part; the Kurz revision is frequently performed today.

The concerto was championed for many years by the noted Czech pianist Rudolf Firkušný, who played it with many different conductors and orchestras around the world before his death in 1994. Once a student of Kurz, Firkušný performed the revised solo part for much of his life, turning towards the original Dvořák score later on in his concert career.

Arranger:
Robert Keller (1828-1891)

Publisher Info.:
Breslau: J. Hainauer, n.d.(ca.1883). Plates J. 2579, 2581 H.

Copyright:
Public Domain

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ruggiero RICCI – LALO Violin Concerto Op.20 – L.de Froment, 1977



Edouard LALO: Violin Concerto in F major Op.20 (1873)
0:13 / I. Andante – Allegro [13’29”]
13:42 / II. Andantino [4’34”]
18:16 / III. Allegro con fuoco [6’06”]
Ruggiero Ricci, violin – Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Louis de Froment, conductor (Recorded: June, July 1977 – VOX)

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons Salvatore Accardo, conducting


Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons

Published on Apr 23, 2012

Antonio Vivaldi The Four Seasons Full HD (Italian: Le quattro stagioni) is a set of four violin concertos by Antonio Vivaldi Full Concert. Composed in 1723, The Four Seasons is Vivaldi’s best-known work, and is among the most popular pieces of Baroque music. The texture of each concerto is varied, each resembling its respective season. For example, “Winter” is peppered with silvery pizzicato notes from the high strings, calling to mind icy rain, whereas “Summer” evokes a thunderstorm in its final movement, which is why the movement is often dubbed “Storm.”
The concertos were first published in 1725 as part of a set of twelve concerti, Vivaldi’s Op. 8, entitled Il cimento dell’armonia e dell’inventione (The Contest between Harmony and Invention). The first four concertos were designated Le quattro stagioni, each being named after a season. Each one is in three movements, with a slow movement between two faster ones. At the time of writing The Four Seasons, the modern solo form of the concerto had not yet been defined (typically a solo instrument and accompanying orchestra). Vivaldi’s original arrangement for solo violin with string quartet and basso continuo helped to define the form.
Die Vier Jahreszeite, Les Quatre Saisons compléter completare all movements
English Chamber Orchestra
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 1 RV 269-1 – Allegro – Spring
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 1 RV 269-2 – Largo – Spring
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 1 RV 269-3 – Allegro – Spring
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 2 RV 315-1 – Allegro Non Molto – Allegro – Summer
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 2 RV 315-2 – Adagio – Summer
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 2 RV 315-3 – Presto – Summer
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 3 RV 293-1 – Allegro – Autumn
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 3 RV 293-2 – Molto Adagio – Autumn
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 3 RV 293-3 – Allegro – Autumn
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 4 RV 297-1 – Allegro Non Molto – Winter
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 4 RV 297-2 – Largo – Winter
Antonio Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, Op 8, N. 4 RV 297-3 – Allegro – Winter
Le quattro stagioni The Four Seasons (Vivaldi) Die Vier Jahreszeiten Las Cuatro Estaciones Classical Music compléter ganze Konzert von Vivaldi Full Concert Complete Music all movements greatest hits

  • Buy “Le Quattro Stagioni, Op. 8; Concerto No 4 in Fa Minore: L’Inverno: Allegro” on

    Google PlayeMusicAmazonMP3

  • Artist
    Salvatore Accardo

 

 

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Great Composers/Performances: Nathaniel Mayfield plays Michael Haydn’s, Concerto in D for Baroque Trumpet



Michael Haydn‘s Concerto in D Major for Baroque Trumpet. Performed live in Concert by Nathaniel Mayfield in Montreal, Canada on Feb. 18, 2009
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Michael Haydn

Johann Michael Haydn (German: [ˈhaɪdən] ( listen); 14 September 1737 – 10 August 1806) was an Austriancomposer of the Classical period, the younger brother of Joseph Haydn.

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Concerto for Flute, Harp, and Orchestra in C major, K. 299



Mozart – Flute and Harp Concerto in C, K. 299
The Concerto for Flute, Harp, and Orchestra in C major, K. 299 is a piece by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart for flute, harp, and orchestra. It is one of only two true double concertos that he wrote, as well as the only piece of music that Mozart wrote that contains the harp. The piece is one of the most popular such concerti in the repertoire, as well as often being found on recordings dedicated otherwise to either one of its featured instruments. The concerto was written in April 1778 by Mozart during his sojourn to Paris for the Court of Guînes. It was commissioned (although never paid for) from Mozart, by the flautist Duke of Guînes, Adrien-Louis de Bonnières, and his harpist daughter who was taking composition lessons from the composer. The soloists in the piece will sometimes play with the orchestra, and at other times perform as a duo while the orchestra is resting. The flute and harp alternate having the melody and accompanying lines. In some passages, they also create counterpoint with just each other. Mozart concertos are standard in how they move harmonically, as well as that they adhere to the three-movement form of fast–slow–fast:
I. Allegro
The orchestra states both themes. The first is immediately present, and the second is introduced by the horn. Both themes fall under the conventional sonata form. The soli then re-work the already present themes.
I. Andantino
The short phrases in this movement are introduced by the strings, and become lyrically extended. This further develops into variations on the theme. The cadenza in this movement leads to a coda, where the orchestra and soli focus on the lyrical theme.
III. Rondeau — Allegro
The harmonic form is: A–B–C–D–C–B–{cadenza}–A(coda). Some music theorists feel that this is actually more of an arch than a typical rondo form, because music from the A section is still audible in the C and D sections.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/

Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 1 in B flat, K. 207



Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 1 in B flat, K. 207
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart‘s Violin Concerto No. 1 in B flat major, K. 207, was originally supposed to have been composed in 1775 (when Mozart was 19), along with the other four wholly authentic violin concerti. However, analysis of handwriting and the manuscript paper on which the concerto was written suggest that the actual date of composition might have been 1773. It has a common three-movement structure. Movements are:
1. Allegro Moderato
2. Adagio
and 3. Presto,
in the usual fast-slow-fast structure. The concerto is full of brilliant passage work with running sixteenth notes and is generally characterized by high spirits. The Rondo in B-flat, K. 269 for violin and orchestra, is also connected to this concerto. It was intended to replace the finale movement, and was composed to fulfill the recommendation of Antonio Brunetti, a violinist in Salzburg at the time. Nonetheless, the concerto is typically performed with the original finale, and the K. 269 Rondo remains a separate concert-piece.

Edvard Grieg – Piano Concerto in A minor Op. 16



Allegro Molto Moderato (0:02) [13.11]
Adagio (13:14) [6.05]
Allegro Moderato Molto E Marcato Quasi Presto Andante Maestoso (19:20) [10.20]

This concerto in three movements was composed by Edvard Grieg in 1868.
Performer Dubravka Tomsic
Radio Symphony Orchestra Ljubljana
Conductor: Anton Nanut

Music of The Orchard Music, APM Music and IODA

 

Vivaldi : Concerto ripieno in sol maggiore RV 151 ”Alla Rustica”



Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741) : Concerto in Sol maggiore RV 151 ”Alla Rustica” per archi e continuo
1) Presto 2) Adagio 3) Allegro
I Solisti Veneti, Claudio Scimone

 

BALDASSARE GALUPPI.-1706-1785.- 4 concerto a quattro Nº 1- 2- 3- 4.



BALDASSARE GALUPPI.-1706-1785.-

4 concerto a quattro Nº 1- 2- 3- 4- G-moll-G-dur-D-dur-Cmolll

1- Concerto a quattro Nº1 in G-moll
Grave e Adagio – Spiritoso- Allegro.

2- Concerto a quattro Nº2 in G-dur
Andante- Allegro- Andante- Allegro assai

3- Concerto a quattro Nº3 in D-dur
Maestoso- Allegro- Andantino

4- Concerto a quattro Nº4 in C-moll
Grave- Allegro- Andante.

English Chamber Orchestra

Director: José Luis García