Tag Archives: Czech Republic

today’s holiday: Czech Statehood Day (St. Wenceslas Day)


Czech Statehood Day (St. Wenceslas Day)

Czech Statehood Day marks the assassination of Duke Vaclav Wenceslas of Bohemia by his brother on September 28, c. 929-935. Wenceslas was canonized as a saint due to his martyr’s death. Czech Statehood Day is a public holiday celebrated throughout the Czech Republic. Every year, the Czech president awards St. Wenceslas medals to people who contributed to Czech statehood. This ceremony takes place at Prague Castle, where a memorial wreath is placed on the statue of St. Wenceslas. In addition, a pilgrimage takes place at Stara Boleslav, the site of his murder. More… Discuss

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today’s holiday: Jan Hus Day


Jan Hus Day

This day is celebrated in the Czech Republic to commemorate Jan Hus, an early 15th-century Czech priest and reformer who advocated the idea of a poor Church that limited itself to Biblical teachings and spiritual affairs. Hus was summoned to the ecclesiastical Council of Constance in 1414; when he refused to recant his teachings, Hus was excommunicated and burnt at the stake on July 6, 1415. Jan Hus Day is a national holiday in the Czech Republic. A wreath is placed on his monument in Old Town Square in Prague, and the national flag is flown at all public places. More… Discuss

Vatican Radio: Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe


Vatican Radio:  Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe

Vatican Radio: Eastern Catholic Church leaders discuss family in Europe (click to access site)

(Vatican Radio)  The annual meeting of the Eastern Catholic hierarchs  of Europe is taking place in Prague- Břevnov (Czech Republic), at the invitation of Mgr Ladislav Hučko, Apostolic Exarch for Byzantine Rite Catholics resident in the Czech Republic. The meeting will take place at the Benedictine Archabbey of St Adalbert and St Margaret (Břevnov).

In Břevnov, the bishops representing 14 Eastern Catholic Churches in Europe are discussing issues concerning the family in Europe and the role and mission of the Eastern Catholic Churches.  The discussions are taking place with a view, too, to the upcoming Ordinary Synod of Bishops on the Family this coming October. Participants at the meeting are examining two reports: one on The contemporary family in Europe by Deacon Jaroslav Max Kašparů, a well-known lecturer in the Czech Republic; and one on the “sacramental potential” of the family by Fr Volodymyr Los, a priest of the Greek-Catholic Church diocese of Buchach, Ukraine.

Mgr Ladislav Hučko was expected to illustrate the situation and mission of the Greek-Catholic Church in the Czech Republic.

The meeting will end on Sunday 7 June with the celebration of the Divine Liturgy along with the local community in the Greek-Catholic Cathedral of St Clement.

Participants at the meeting, organised by the Council of European Episcopal Conferences (CCEE), include Mgr Cyril Vasil’, Archbishop Secretary of the Congregation for the Oriental Churches, and Mgr Duarte da Cunha, CCEE General Secretary.

great compositions/performances: Antonín Dvořák – Humoresque No. 7, Op. 101


Antonín DvořákHumoresque No. 7, Op. 101

Dvorak : Symphony No.1 in C Minor, “The Bells of Zlonice” , great compositions/performances


Dvorak : Symphony No.1 in C Minor, “The Bells of Zlonice”

Islam in Europe: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Islam in Europe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Islam gained its first foothold in continental Europe in 711 with the Umayyad conquest of Hispania. They advanced into France but in 732, were defeated by the Franks at the Battle of Tours. Over the centuries the Umayyads were gradually driven south and in 1492 the Moorish Emirate of Granada surrendered to Ferdinand V and Isabella. Muslim civilians were expelled from Spain and by 1614 none remained.[2]

Islam entered Eastern and Southeastern Europe in what are now parts of Russia and Bulgaria in the 13th century. The Ottoman Empire expanded into Europe taking portions of the Byzantine Empire in the 14th and 15th centuries. Over the centuries, the Ottoman Empire also gradually lost almost all of its European territories, until its collapse in 1922. However, parts of the Balkans (such as Albania and Bosnia) continued to have a large populations of Muslims.

In the late 20th and early 21st centuries substantial numbers of Muslims immigrated to Europe. By 2010 an estimated 44 million Muslims were living in Europe.

Islam in Europe
by percentage of country population[1]

 
 
FROM WIKIPEDIA: Islam in Europe

FROM WIKIPEDIA: Islam in Europe (click to enlarge)

Islam gained its first foothold in continental Europe in 711 with the Umayyad conquest of Hispania. They advanced into France but in 732, were defeated by the Franks at the Battle of Tours. Over the centuries the Umayyads were gradually driven south and in 1492 the Moorish Emirate of Granada surrendered to Ferdinand V and Isabella. Muslim civilians were expelled from Spain and by 1614 none remained.[2]

Islam entered Eastern and Southeastern Europe in what are now parts of Russia and Bulgaria in the 13th century. The Ottoman Empire expanded into Europe taking portions of the Byzantine Empire in the 14th and 15th centuries. Over the centuries, the Ottoman Empire also gradually lost almost all of its European territories, until its collapse in 1922. However, parts of the Balkans (such as Albania and Bosnia) continued to have a large populations of Muslims.

In the late 20th and early 21st centuries substantial numbers of Muslims immigrated to Europe. By 2010 an estimated 44 million Muslims were living in Europe.

Iberia and Southern France

 
A manuscript page of the Qur’an in the script developed in al-Andalus, 12th century.
Main articles: Al-Andalus and Moors

 
The Moors request permission from James I of Aragon, Spain, 13th century

Muslim forays into Europe began shortly after the religion’s inception, with a short lived invasion of Byzantine Sicily by a small Arab and Berber force that landed in 652. Islam gained its first foothold in continental Europe from 711 onward, with the Umayyad conquest of Hispania. The invaders named their land Al-Andalus, which expanded to include what is now Portugal and Spain except for the northern highlands of Asturias, Basque country, Navarra and few other places protected by mountain chains from southward invasions.

Al-Andalus has been estimated to have had a Muslim majority by the 10th century after most of the local population converted to Islam.[3]:42 This coincided with the La Convivencia period of the Iberian Peninsula as well as the Golden age of Jewish culture in Spain. Pelayo of Asturias began the Christian counter-offensive known as the Reconquista after the Battle of Covadonga in 722. Slowly, the Christian forces began a conquest of the fractured taifa kingdoms of al-Andalus. By 1236, practically all that remained of Muslim Spain was the southern province of Granada.

In the 8th century, Muslim forces pushed beyond Spain into Aquitaine, in southern France, but suffered a temporary setback when defeated by Eudes, Duke of Aquitaine, at the Battle of Toulouse (721). In 725 Muslim forces captured Autun in France. The town would be the easternmost point of expansion of Umayyad forces into Europe; just seven years later in 732, the Umayyads would be forced to begin their withdrawal to al-Andalus after facing defeat at the Battle of Tours by Frankish King Charles Martel. From 719 to 759, Septimania was one of the five administrative areas of al-Andalus. The last Muslim forces were driven from France in 759, but maintained a presence, especially in Fraxinet all the way into Switzerland until the 10th century.[4] At the same time, Muslim forces managed to capture Sicily and portions of southern Italy, and even sacked Rome in 846 and later sacked Pisa in 1004.

Sicily

Muslim musicians at the court of the Norman King Roger II of Sicily, 12th century

Sicily was gradually conquered by the Arabs and Berbers from 827 onward, and the Emirate of Sicily was established in 965. They held onto the region until their expulsion by the Normans in 1072.[5][6]

The local population conquered by the Muslims were Romanized Catholic Sicilians in Western Sicily and partially Greek speaking Christians, mainly in the eastern half of the island, but there were also a significant number of Jews.[7] These conquered people were afforded a limited freedom of religion under the Muslims as dhimmi, but were subject to some restrictions. The dhimmi were also required to pay the jizya, or poll tax, and the kharaj or land tax, but were exempt from the tax that Muslims had to pay (Zakaat). Under Arab rule there were different categories of Jizya payers, but their common denominator was the payment of the Jizya as a mark of subjection to Muslim rule in exchange for protection against foreign and internal aggression. The conquered population could avoid this subservient status simply by converting to Islam. Whether by honest religious conviction or societal compulsion large numbers of native Sicilians converted to Islam. However, even after 100 years of Islamic rule, numerous Greek speaking Christian communities prospered, especially in north-eastern Sicily, as dhimmi. This was largely a result of the Jizya system which allowed co-existence. This co-existence with the conquered population fell apart after the reconquest of Sicily, particularly following the death of King William II of Sicily in 1189.

Cultural impact and Christian interaction

“Araz” coat of arms of Polish Tatar nobility. Tatar coats of arms often included motifs related to Islam.

 
Mosque of Rome, in Rome, the largest in the EU

 
The East London Mosque is the first mosque which was allowed to broadcast the adhan in European Union.

The Christian reconquests the Iberian peninsula and southern Italy helped to reintroduce ideas and concepts lost to the Western World after the fall of Rome in A.D. 476. Arab speaking Christian scholars saved influential pre-Christian texts and this coupled with the introduction of aspects of medieval Islamic culture (including the arts, agriculture, economics, philosophy, science and technology) assisted with fomenting conditions required for a rebirth of European thought and art (Renaissance). (See Latin translations of the 12th century and Islamic contributions to Medieval Europe for more information).

Muslim rule endured in the Emirate of Granada, from 1238 as a vassal state of the Christian Kingdom of Castile, until the completion of La Reconquista in 1492.[3]:41 The Moriscos (Moorish in Spanish) were finally expelled from Spain between 1609 (Castile) and 1614 (rest of Spain), by Philip III during the Spanish Inquisition.

Throughout the 16th to 19th centuries, the Barbary States sent Barbary pirates to raid nearby parts of Europe in order to capture Christian slaves to sell at slave markets in the Arab World throughout the Renaissance period.[8][9] According to Robert Davis, from the 16th to 19th centuries, pirates captured 1 million to 1.25 million Europeans as slaves. These slaves were captured mainly from the crews of captured vessels[10] and from coastal villages in Spain and Portugal, and from farther places like Italy, France or England, the Netherlands, Ireland, the Azores Islands, and even Iceland.[8]

For a long time, until the early 18th century, the Crimean Khanate maintained a massive slave trade with the Ottoman Empire and the Middle East.[11] The Crimean Tatars frequently mounted raids into the Danubian principalities, Poland-Lithuania, and Russia to enslave people whom they could capture.[12]

The Great Mosque of Paris, built after World War I.

The Balkans, Russia and Ukraine

 
Log pod Mangartom Mosque was the only mosque ever built in Slovenia, in the town of Log pod Mangartom, during World War I.

There are accounts of the trade connections between the Muslims and the Rus, apparently people from Baltic region who made their way towards the Black Sea through Central Russia. On his way to Volga Bulgaria, Ibn Fadlan brought detailed reports of the Rus, claiming that some had converted to Islam. “They are very fond of pork and many of them who have assumed the path of Islam miss it very much.” The Rus also relished their nabidh, a fermented drink Ibn Fadlan often mentioned as part of their daily fare.[13]

The Ottoman campaign for territorial expansion in Europe in 1566, Crimean Tatars as vanguard.

The Mongols began their conquest of Rus’, Volga Bulgaria, and the Cuman-Kipchak Confederation (present day Russia and Ukraine) in the 13th century. After the Mongol empire split, the eastern European section became known as the Golden Horde. Despite the fact that they were not Muslim at the time, the western Mongols adopted Islam as their religion in the early 14th century under Berke Khan, and later Uzbeg Khan who established it as the official religion of the state. Much of the mostly Turkic-speaking population of the Horde, as well as the small Mongol aristocracy, were Islamized (if they were not already Muslim, such as the Volga Bulgars) and became known to Russians and Europeans as the Tatars. More than half[14] of the European portion of what is now Russia and Ukraine, were under suzerainty of Muslim Tatars and Turks from the 13th to 15th centuries. The Crimean Khanate became a vassal state of the Ottoman Empire in 1475 and subjugated what remained of the Great Horde by 1502. The Khanate of Kazan was conquered by Ivan the Terrible in 1552.

Balkans during the Ottoman Empire

The Ottoman Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent, awaits the arrival of his Greek Muslim Grand Vizier Pargalı Ibrahim Pasha at Buda, in the year 1529.

 
Medieval Bulgaria particularly the city of Sofia, was the administrative centre of almost all Ottoman possessions in the Balkans also known as Rumelia.[15]

The Ottoman Empire began its expansion into Europe by taking the European portions of the Byzantine Empire in the 14th and 15th centuries up until the 1453 capture of Constantinople, establishing Islam as the state religion in the region. The Ottoman Empire continued to stretch northwards, taking Hungary in the 16th century, and reaching as far north as the Podolia in the mid-17th century (Peace of Buczacz), by which time most of the Balkans was under Ottoman control. Ottoman expansion in Europe ended with their defeat in the Great Turkish War. In the Treaty of Karlowitz (1699), the Ottoman Empire lost most of its conquests in Central Europe. The Crimean Khanate was later annexed by Russia in 1783.[16] Over the centuries, the Ottoman Empire gradually lost almost all of its European territories, until its collapse in 1922, when the former empire was transformed into the nation of Turkey.

Between 1354 (when the Ottomans crossed into Europe at Gallipolli) and 1526, the Empire had conquered the territory of present day Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Albania, Serbia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Hungary. The Empire laid siege to Vienna in 1683. The intervention of the Polish King broke the siege, and from then afterwards the Ottomans battled the Habsburg Emperors until 1699, when the Treaty of Karlowitz forced them to surrender Hungary and portions of present day Croatia, Slovenia and Serbia. From 1699 to 1913, wars and insurrections pushed the Ottoman Empire further back until it reached the current European border of present-day Turkey.

For most of this period, the Ottoman retreats were accompanied by Muslim refugees from these province (in almost all cases converts from the previous subject populations), leaving few Muslim inhabitants in Hungary, Croatia, and the Transylvania region of present day Romania. Bulgaria remained under Ottoman rule until around 1878, and currently its population includes about 131,000 Muslims (2001 Census) (see Pomaks).

Painting of the bazaar at Athens, Ottoman Greece, early 19th century

Bosnia was conquered by the Ottomans in 1463, and a large portion of the population converted to Islam in the first 200 years of Ottoman domination. By the time Austria-Hungary occupied Bosnia in 1878, the Habsburgs had shed the desire to re-Christianize new provinces. As a result, a sizable Muslim population in Bosnia survived into the 20th century. Albania and the Kosovo area remained under Ottoman rule until 1913. Previous to the Ottoman conquest, the northern Albanians were Roman Catholic and the southern Albanians were Christian Orthodox, but by 1913 the majority were Muslim.

Conversion to Islam

Apart from the effect of a lengthy period under Ottoman domination, many of the subject population were converted to Islam as a result of a deliberate move by the Ottomans as part of a policy of ensuring the loyalty of the population against a potential Venetian invasion. However, Islam was spread by force in the areas under the control of the Ottoman Sultan through devşirme and jizya.[17][18]

Rather Arnold explains Islam’s spread by quoting 17th-century pro-Muslim[citation needed] author Johannes Scheffler who stated:

Meanwhile he (i.e. the Turk) wins (converts) by craft more than by force, and snatches away Christ by fraud out of the hearts of men. For the Turk, it is true, at the present time compels no country by violence to apostatise; but he uses other means whereby imperceptibly he roots out Christianity… What then has become of the Christians? They are not expelled from the country, neither are they forced to embrace the Turkish faith: then they must of themselves have been converted into Turks.[19]

Cultural influences

Islam piqued interest among European scholars, setting off the movement of Orientalism. The founder of modern Islamic studies in Europe was Ignác Goldziher, who began studying Islam in the late 19th century. For instance, Sir Richard Francis Burton, 19th-century English explorer, scholar, and orientalist, and translator of The Book of One Thousand and One Nights, disguised himself as a Pashtun and visited both Medina and Mecca during the Hajj, as described in his book A Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to Al-Medinah and Meccah.

Islamic architecture influenced European architecture in various ways (for example, the Türkischer Tempel synagogue in Vienna). During the 12th-century Renaissance in Europe, Latin translations of Arabic texts were introduced. The Koran was also translated (for example, Lex Mahumet pseudoprophete).

Current population and its perception

Muslim-majority areas in Europe

According to the Pew Forum, the total number of Muslims in Europe in 2010 was about 44 million (6%),[20] excluding Turkey. The total number of Muslims in the European Union in 2010 was about 19 million (3.8%).[20] Approximately 9 million Turks are living in Europe, excluding the Turkish population of Turkey, which makes up the largest Muslim immigrant community in Europe.[21] However the real number of Muslims in Europe is not well-known. The percentage of Muslims in Russia (the biggest group of Muslims in Europe) varies from 5[22] to 11.7%,[20] depending on sources. It also depends on if only observant Muslims or all people of Muslim descent are counted.[citation needed]

The Mosque of Sultan Mehmet Fatih in Pristina, Kosovo

The Muslim population in Europe is extremely diverse with varied histories and origins. Today, the Muslim-majority regions of Europe are Albania, Kosovo, parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina, parts of Bulgaria and Macedonia, as well as some Russian regions in Northern Caucasus and the Volga region. The Muslim-dominated Sandžak of Novi Pazar is divided between Serbia and Montenegro. They consist predominantly of indigenous Europeans of the Muslim faith whose religious tradition dates back several hundred years. The transcontinental countries of Turkey, Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan also are Muslim majority.

The Muslim population in Western Europe is composed primarily of peoples who arrived to the European continent in or after (1945), when France declared itself a country of immigration. Muslim emigration to metropolitan France surged during the Algerian War of Independence. In 1961, West German Government invited first Gastarbeiters. Similar contracts were offered by Switzerland. A 2013 poll by Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung says that Islamic fundamentalism is widespread among European Muslims with the majority saying religious rules are more important than civil laws and three quarters rejecting religious pluralism within Islam.[23] The European Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia reports that the Muslim population tends to suffer Islamophobia all over Europe, although the perceptions and views of Muslims may vary.[24]

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees estimated that 70% of the people of Albania [25][26][27] are Muslim, 91% in Kosovo, and 30% of them in Macedonia are Muslim. Bosnia has a Muslim plurality. In transcontinental countries such as Turkey 99%, and 93% in Azerbaijan[28] of the population is Muslim respectively. Muslims also form about one sixth of the population of Montenegro. In Russia, Moscow is home to an estimated 1.5 million Muslims.[29][30][31]

Projections

 
According to the Pew Research Center, Europe’s population was 6% Muslim in 2010, and is projected to be 8% Muslim by 2030.[20]

Don Melvin wrote in 2004 that, excluding Russia, Europe’s Muslim population will double by 2020. He also says that almost 85% of Europe’s total population growth in 2005 was due to immigration in general.[30][32] Omer Taspinar predicted in 2001 that the Muslim population of Europe will nearly double by 2015, while the non-Muslim will shrink by 3.5%, if the higher Muslim birth rate persists.[33] In the UK, between 2001 and 2009, the Muslim population increased roughly 10 times faster than the rest of the population.[34]

A 2007 Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) report argued that some Muslim population projections are overestimated.[35] Philip Jenkins of Penn State University estimates that by 2100, Muslims will compose about 25% of Europe’s population. Jenkins states this figure does not take account divergent birthrates amongst Europe’s immigrant Christians.[36] Other analysts are skeptical about the accuracy of the claimed Muslim population growth, stating that because many European countries do not ask a person’s religion on official forms or in censuses, it has been difficult to obtain accurate estimates, and arguing that there has been a decrease in Muslim fertility rates in Morocco, the Netherlands and Turkey.[37] A Pew Research Center study, published in January 2011, forecast an increase of Muslims in European population from 6% in 2010 to 8% in 2030.[20] Pew also found that Muslim fertility rate in Europe would drop from 2.2 in 2010 to 2.0 in 2030. On the other hand, the non-Muslim fertility rate in Europe would increase from 1.5 in 2010 to 1.6 in 2030.[20]

by percentage of country population[1]
  < 1%
  1–2%
  2–4%
  4–5%
  5–10%
  10–20%
  20–30%
Cyprus
  30–40%
Rep. of Macedonia
  40–50%
Bosnia–Herzegovina
  80–90%
Albania
  90–95%
Kosovo
  95–100%

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news: Rare Rhino on Brink of Extinction


In the News

Rare Rhino on Brink of Extinction

A northern white rhino died at the San Diego Zoo this week, leaving only five in the world. Only one male remains, and is considered unable to reproduce naturally due to old age. An international team of experts is now considering ways to save the species, including the possibility of in vitro fertilization. Hopes for natural breeding were dashed earlier this year when a younger male died in October. Northern white rhinos have been hunted to near extinction for their horns. More… Discuss

Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan: great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan

Movements:

1. Adagio, 4/8 — Allegro molto, 2/4, E minor
2. Largo, common time, D-flat major, then later C-sharp minor
3. Scherzo: Molto vivace — Poco sostenuto, 3/4, E minor
4. Allegro con fuoco, common time, E minor, ends in E major
Sinfonia n.º 9 (Dvořák)
A Sinfonia Nº. 9 em Mi menor Op. 95 Sinfonia do Novo Mundo
Symfonie č. 9 (Dvořák), Symfonie č.9, e-moll, op. 95 Antonína Dvořáka

Instrumentation
This symphony is scored for an orchestra of the following:
2 flutes (one doubling piccolo)
2 oboes (one doubling on English horn)
2 clarinets in A and B♭ (B♭ in movement 2)
2 bassoons
4 horns in E, C and F
2 trumpets in E, C and E♭
2 tenor trombones
bass trombone
tuba (second movement only)
timpani
triangle (third movement only)
cymbals (fourth movement only)
strings
Symphony No. 9 (Dvořák)

today’s holidady: Feast of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary


Feast of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

The Feast of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary was first celebrated by the Greeks in about the 8th century and was not adopted by the Roman Catholic Church until the later Middle Ages; no one is quite sure when this festival was first introduced. As related in the apocryphal Book of James, it commemorates the presentation of the three-year-old Mary in the Temple to consecrate her to the service of God. More… Discuss

Farage: Thank you for confirming Cameron is the real fantasist, Mr Barroso|europarl


Farage: Thank you for confirming Cameron is the real fantasist, Mr Barroso

Bedřich Smetana – Ma Vlast – Vltava “Moldau” – EMH Classical Music: make music part of your lifr series



from

Bedřich Smetana – Ma Vlast – Vltava “Moldau” – EMH Classical Music

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Nigel Farage: Dave is whistling in the wind


[youtube.com/watch?v=xNb7pR6BvuE]

Nigel Farage: Dave is whistling in the wind
Published on Jul 2, 2014

http://www.ukipmeps.org | @Nigel_Farage
European Parliament, Strasbourg, 02 July 2014

• Speaker: Nigel Farage MEP, Leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP), Co-President of the ‘Europe of Freedom and Democracy‘ (EFD) Group in the European Parliament – http://www.nigelfaragemep.co.uk

• Bluecard question: Philippe LAMBERTS MEP (Belgium), Greens group

• Debate: Conclusions of the European Council meeting (26-27 June 2014)
European Council and Commission statements
[2013/2967(RSP)]
In the presence of Mr Van Rompuy

Transcript here: http://www.ukipmeps.org/articles_833_…
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Video source: EbS (European Parliament)
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EU Member States:
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom

today’s holiday: Five-Petalled Rose Festival


Five-Petalled Rose Festival

The Festival of the Five-Petalled Rose takes place in Cesky Krumlov in the Czech Republic, which prospered during the Renaissance; today’s festival permits residents and visitors to relive the town’s past glories. Festival highlights include swordplay demonstrations, plays and street dramas, a medieval feast, a historical market, Renaissance crafts, musical entertainment, and medieval games and dances. The festival takes its name from the rose on the coat of arms of the Rosenbergs, the noble family that lived in the town castle during the late medieval and Renaissance periods. More… Discuss

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonin Dvorak – Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)


[youtube.com/watch?v=qP-ymoLlKMY]

Antonin Dvorak – Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)

Antonín Leopold Dvořák (September 8, 1841 — May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer. Following the nationalist example of Bedřich Smetana, Dvořák frequently employed features of the folk musics of Moravia and his native Bohemia (then parts of the Austrian Empire and now constituting the Czech Republic). Dvořák’s own style has been described as ‘the fullest recreation of a national idiom with that of the symphonic tradition, absorbing folk influences and finding effective ways of using them.’

Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)

1. Allegro agitato
2. Andante sostenuto (18:09)
3. Allegro con fuoco (26:21)

Rudolf Firkušný, piano and the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra conducted by Walter Susskind.

The Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in G minor, Op. 33, was the first of three concertos that Antonín Dvořák completed—it was followed by a violin concerto and then a cello concerto—and the piano concerto is probably the least known and least performed.

As the eminent music critic Harold Schonberg put it, Dvořák wrote “an attractive Piano Concerto in G minor with a rather ineffective piano part, a beautiful Violin Concerto in A minor, and a supreme Cello Concerto in B minor“.

(bartje11 totally disagrees with the eminent Harold Schonberg)

Dvořák composed his piano concerto from late August through 14 September 1876. Its autograph version contains many corrections, erasures, cuts and additions, the bulk of which were made in the piano part. The work was premiered in Prague on 24 March 1878, with the orchestra of the Prague Provisional Theatre conducted by Adolf Cech with the Czech pianist Karel Slavkovsky.

Dvořák himself realized that he had not created a piece in which the piano does battle with the orchestra, as it is not a virtuosic piece. As Dvořák wrote: “I see I am unable to write a Concerto for a virtuoso; I must think of other things.”
(bartje11: maybe not a work with obvious virtuoso fireworks, but still a very, very difficult piano part, not for the average pianist)

What Dvořák composed, instead, was a symphonic concerto in which the piano plays a leading part in the orchestra, rather than opposed to it.

In an effort to mitigate awkward passages and expand the pianist’s range of sonorities, the Czech pianist and pedagogue Vilém Kurz undertook an extensive re-writing of the solo part; the Kurz revision is frequently performed today.

The concerto was championed for many years by the noted Czech pianist Rudolf Firkušný, who played it with many different conductors and orchestras around the world before his death in 1994. Once a student of Kurz, Firkušný performed the revised solo part for much of his life, turning towards the original Dvořák score later on in his concert career.

Arranger:
Robert Keller (1828-1891)

Publisher Info.:
Breslau: J. Hainauer, n.d.(ca.1883). Plates J. 2579, 2581 H.

Copyright:
Public Domain

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Antonín Dvořák – Czech Suite, Op. 39


[youtube.com/watch?v=mYXlM0Mcqms]

Antonín DvořákCzech Suite, Op. 39

Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: POLISH CONSTITUTION DAY


Polish Constitution Day

May 3, known in Poland as Swieto Trzeciego Maja, is a patriotic legal holiday honoring the nation’s first constitution, adopted in 1791. It introduced fundamental changes in the way Poland was governed, based on the ideas of the French Revolution, and represented an attempt to preserve the country’s independence. Although the May 3rd Constitution (as it was called) represented a great advance for the Polish people, it also aroused the anxieties of neighboring countries and eventually led to theSecond Partition two years later. More… Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Bartered Bride Blachut Cervinková Ancerl Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra 1947


[youtube.com/watch?v=iSDlIbTy5_Y&list=TL-MtFaNsE4LDiEQB1T4YjN0wYqSuNH_iQ]

Bartered Bride Prodaná nevěsta Karel Ancerl

Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra 1947

Jenik – Beno Blachut
Marenka – Ludmila Cervinková
Krusina – Ladislav Mraz
Ludmilla – Jarmila Palivcova
Micha – Josef Heriban
Hata – Vera Krilová
Vasek – Rudolf Vonásek
Kecal – Karel Kalas
Circus master – Bohumir Vich
Esmeralda – Jarmilla Pechová
Indian – Jan Soumar
Smetana

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European Parliament, Strasbourg, 12 March 2014 (was EU ever meant to be a Political Body?)


[youtube.com/watch?v=j4FdbIVa2j0&feature=em-uploademail]
http://www.ukipmeps.org | http://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage
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European Parliament, Strasbourg, 12 March 2014

• Speaker: Nigel Farage MEP, Leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP), Co-President of the ‘Europe of Freedom and Democracy‘ (EFD) Group in the European Parliament –http://www.nigelfaragemep.co.uk

• Debate: Preparations for the European Council meeting (20-21 March 2014)
Council and Commission statements
[2013/2699(RSP)]

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Video source: EbS (European Parliament)
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EU Member States:
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: The Moldau/Vltava by Bedřich Smetana – Symphonic poem from “Ma Vlast- My Country”



Vltava– Ma Vlast:  Bedřich SmetanaSymphonic poem
The London Symphony Orchestra,  Alfred Scholz 
conducting

 

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Jurnal de calatorie prin Tara Fagarasului (bring your appetite with you, we’ll do the rest!)


F_A_I_T_H_by_Schumis

Click to access Tara Fagarasului here

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Post by Romania – Carpathian Garden: Fundata Brasov


Fundata - Brasov County - Romania Photo: http://www.fundata-sirnea.ro/

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Post by Romania – Carpathian Garden.

View Larger Map

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B. Smetana: Prodaná nevěsta (předehra) / The Bartered Bride (Overture)



Záznam z Novoročního koncertu České filharmonie 1. 1. 2013 v pražském Rudolfinu. / Czech Philharmonic performing at the 2013 New Year Eve’s concert in Rudolfinum, Prague.

Česká filharmonie
Jiří Bělohlávek — dirigent / conductor

Zvuk: Český rozhlas / Audio: Czech Radio

 

Godfrey Bloom: The State is an Institution of Theft (Murray N. Rothbard)



European Parliament, Brussels, 21 November 2013

• Speaker: Godfrey Bloom MEP, Ind. (Yorkshire & Lincolnshire), Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) group –http://www.godfreybloommep.co.uk

• Debate: Action programme for taxation in the European Union for the period 2014-2020

Report: Theodor Dumitru Stolojan (A7-0399/2012)
Amended proposal for a regulation of the European parliament and of the Council establishing an action programme for taxation in the European Union for the period 2014-2020 (Fiscalis 2020) and repealing Decision n°1482/2007/EC
[COM(2012)0465 – C7-0242/2012 – 2011/0341B(COD)]
Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs

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• Video: EbS (European Parliament)
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• EU Member States:
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom

Read more about  Murray N. Rothbard  Here

 

Farage: You can stop these dark forces, Mr Van Rompuy


Published on Nov 5, 2013

http://www.ukipmeps.org | http://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage
Join UKIP: http://ukip.datawareonline.co.uk/Join…
• European Parliament, Brussels, 5 November 2013

• Speaker: Nigel Farage MEP, Leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP), Co-President of the ‘Europe of Freedom and Democracy‘ (EFD) Group in the European Parliament –http://www.nigelfaragemep.co.uk

• Conference of Presidents

Outcome of the European Council with the participation of Herman Van ROMPUYPresident of the European Council – and Maroš ŠEFČOVIČ – Vice-President of the EC in charge of Inter-Institutional Relations and Administration

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Video source: EbS (European Parliament)
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Transcript

Mr Van Rompuy, it’s been a long time, lovely to see you.

Today is November the 5th, a big celebration, festival day in England. Just over 400 years ago there was an attempt to blow up the house of parliament with dynamite and to destroy our constitution.

That was a violent approach, you of course have taken the dull, technocratic approach to all of these things, and indeed what you and your colleagues say time and again. You talk about e-initiative and what yoiu are going to do about employment – but the reality is, nothing in this Union is getting any better.

Indeed the accounts – I thought it was 18 years in a row the accounts hadn’t been signed off for, I’m now told told that it’s 19 and you are doing your best to tone down any criticism whatever growth figure you may have, they are pretty anemic, and youth unemployment in the Mediterranean is 50% plus in several states.

And of course you’ll notice there is now a rise in opposition – real opposition – and much of it pretty ugly opposition, not stuff that I myself would want to lick hands with.

It was three and a half years ago that I got into some trouble by questioning who your tailor was. And they fined me 3,000 euros for doing so. Of course, I clearly was wrong. Look at you today, you are the smart, snappy young man around town.

But there’s no question that your legitimacy hasn’t grown in those three and a half years. In fact neither you, nor the Commission – even the Parliament – none of that connection with ordinary people has got greater. And that is why there is an electoral storm coming. There’s something very dramatic that’s going to happen in the third week of May next year [2014].

But you can stop it. You can stop these dark forces as you see them swarming into this Parliament, by actually admitting, openly, that the time has now come to legitimise, or otherwise, these institutions by holding free and fair referendums in the Member States as to whether your position should even exist.

Because the French and Dutch said, Mr Van Rompuy, you shouldn’t exist. They vetoed it and yet you continue regardless.

Are you prepared to sit there and wait for the electoral storm, or would you take the initiative and do your best to legitimise democratically this European Union, or not?

SECOND ROUND (following Mr Van Rompuy’s remarks)

Just for a moment there it got fun, you got angry with me,, it all became impassioned. That was brilliant, because prior to that it was the usual dirge, wasn’t it. It was Mr Van Rompuy talking about a ‘single supervisory mechanism’, a ‘resolution fund’.

What real people are talking about is the lack of jobs, the insanity – as in our case – opening the doors next year to the whole of Romania and Bulgaria. 

So maybe, Mr van Rompuy, the answer is to ignore my pleas for a referendum and just come out and start attacking me and the eurosceptics and maybe then we’ll make it a real European election.

But I warn you, the language that you and the rest of the European Commission use is not the way that ordinary people speak, it’s not how they feel, and honestly, you sit there in front of that flag behind you: That flag and your position were rejected by the French and Dutch in 2005, you’ve carried on regardless, you have no legitimacy.

Let’s fight it out on the battleground next May.
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EU Member States:
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom

 

Rise of Eurosceptism an assertion of identity – Nigel Farage (v.4×3)


Published on Oct 23, 2013

 

http://www.ukipmeps.org | http://twitter.com/Nigel_Farage
Join UKIP: http://ukip.datawareonline.co.uk/Join…
• European Parliament, Strasbourg, 23 October 2013

• Speaker: Nigel Farage MEP, Leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP), Co-President of the ‘Europe of Freedom and Democracy‘ (EFD) Group in the European Parliament –http://www.nigelfaragemep.co.uk

• Debate: Preparations for the European Council meeting (24-25 October 2013)
Council and Commission statements
[2013/2625(RSP)]

Transcript

There is only one real debate going on here this week in Strasbourg, it is the fear stalking the corridors. The concern you’ve got about the rise of Euroscepticism.

Years ago, you were less worried, the few of us here who were eurosceptic were treated as being mentally ill and sort of patted on the head.

But now we are ‘evil’, ‘populists’, we are ‘dangerous’; we are going to bring down Western civilisation. And it is clear, you don’t get it. You don’t understand why this is happening – well let me help you.

In 2005, it was the pivotal moment of this project, the French and the Dutch had said No to the EU Constitution. Mr Barroso stood up and said they didn’t really vote no, they didn’t understand what they’d be 

They did! You see ever since 2005, the real European debate is about identity. What we are saying, large numbers of us from every single EU member state is: we don’t want that flag, we don’t want the anthem that you all stood so ram-rod straight for yesterday, we don’t want EU passports, we don’t want political union.

And if you think about it, there is nothing extreme about that position, there is nothing right wing about that position, there is nothing left wing indeed about that position. It is a normal sensible assertion of identity. Because what we are saying on our side of the argument… [shouting from MEPS] Well you see you can scream and shout all you like, which really rather proves to me why you are going to do so badly in the European elections next year. Because you are not listening.

We want to live and work and breathe in a Europe of nation state democracy. We want to trade together, we want to cooperate together. We are happy to agree sensible common minimum standards, and yes we want to control our own borders which is the rational logical and sensible thing for any nation state to do. We are not against immigration, we are not against immigrants, we believe there needs to be a degree of control.

And that is the message that is picking up support right across this continent and I genuinely think that there is an opportunity for an electoral earthquake to happen in the European elections next year with a large number of people from all sides of this House who will come with a nation state agenda. Who will come saying, let’s have a Europe, as De Gaulle might have said, of the patrie. Let’s not have a Europe of political union. And you can abuse us all you like, but what we stand for is fair, principled and democratic.

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Video source: EbS (European Parliament)
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• EU Member States:
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom

Godfrey Bloom: The central banks are all at it, counterfeiting money!


Published on Sep 10, 2013

http://www.ukipmeps.org | Join UKIP:http://ukip.datawareonline.co.uk/Join…
European Parliament, Strasbourg, 10 September 2013

• Speaker: Godfrey Bloom MEP, UKIP (Yorkshire & Lincolnshire), Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) group –http://www.godfreybloommep.co.uk

• Debate: Credit agreements relating to residential property
Report: Antolín Sánchez Presedo (A7-0202/2012)
Report on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on credit agreements relating to residential property
[COM(2011)0142 – C7-0085/2011 – 2011/0062(COD)]
Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs
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• Video: EbS (European Parliament)
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EU Member States:
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom

 

Today’s Birthday: Wenceslaus III of Bohemia (1289)


Wenceslaus III of Bohemia (1289)

Wenceslaus III was king of Bohemia and of Hungary. Unable to assert his authority in Hungary, even with the help of his father, Wenceslaus II, he relinquished his claim to Duke Otto of Bavaria in 1305. He attempted to assert his hereditary claim to the Polish crown but was assassinated while marching to Poland. After an interregnum, John of Luxemburg, who married Wenceslaus’s sister, was elected king of Bohemia. Wenceslaus III was the last member of what dynasty? More… Discuss