Tag Archives: Dance

Melodie for cello and orchestra Op.20 No.1 by Alexander Glazunov


Melodie for cello and orchestra Op.20 No.1 by Alexander Glazunov

Goyescas: 3. Fandango By Candle Light: make music part of your life series


Goyescas: 3. Fandango By Candle Light

Enrique Granados. Valses poeticos by Mircea Gogoncea: make music part of your life series


Enrique Granados. Valses poeticos by Mircea Gogoncea

Kabuki


Kabuki

Kabuki, a popular form of Japanese drama, is known for its spectacular staging, elaborate costumes, and striking makeup in place of masks. It originated in 1603, when a woman named Izumo no Okuni began performing a new style of dance that became instantly popular. Rival troupes quickly formed, and kabuki evolved into an ensemble dance performed by women—a form much different from its modern incarnation in which men play all the roles. Why were women banned from the kabuki stage in 1629? More… Discuss

Ice Dancing


Ice Dancing

In ice dancing, couples are required to perform choreographed dance routines on ice. It differs from pair skating in that it does not allow movements of strength, such as jumps or overhead lifts. Ice dance routines are similar to ballroom dances, and, typically, partners are not supposed to separate by more than two arm-lengths. The sport gained popularity in the 1930s, and the first world championships were held in 1950. When did ice dancing become an Olympic event? More… Discuss

Isadora Duncan


Isadora Duncan

Duncan was a pioneer of modern dance. Though born in the US, she was never very popular there. It was in Europe where she achieved great acclaim. An innovator and liberator of expressive movement, Duncan rejected the conventions of classical ballet and gave lecture-demonstrations of what she called “the dance of the future.” Inspired by the drama of ancient Greece, she danced barefoot while wearing revealing Greek tunics and flowing scarves. How did her fondness for scarves lead to her death? More… Discuss

thoday’s holiday: Maidens’ Fair on Mount Gaina


Maidens’ Fair on Mount Gaina

The Maidens’ Fair is a major folk festival held at Mount Gaina in Transylvania, Romania. It was originally a marriage fair, where young men came to choose their future wives, but is now an opportunity for people to display their talents in handicrafts, costume making, singing, and dancing. Thousands of people gather for the events of the fair, which include dance competitions and concerts by folk bands and singers. Other aspects of the festival are feasts and bonfires, and the chanting of satirical verses during certain folk dances. More…
[youtube.com/watch?v=_kO_NPMPhH8]

TARGUL DE FETE DE PE MUNTELE GAINA

Published on Dec 5, 2012

PRODUCTIE MEDIA NELSTILL-filme de prezentare obiective turistice, hoteluri, pensiuni
Contact: office@nelstill.com http://www.nelstill.com
http://videohive.net/user/nels/portfo…

make music part of your life series: Carl Nielsen – Aladdin Suite, FS. 89 (1919)


[youtube.com/watch?v=oJOEdlTYJQ8]

Carl Nielsen – Aladdin Suite,
FS. 89 (1919)

Herbert Blomstedt, San Francisco Symphony
I. Oriental Festive March 02.57
II. Aladdin’s Dream and Dance of the Morning Mist 02.48, 02:58
III. Hindu Dance 02.21, 05:46
IV. Chinese Dance 03.27, 08:08
V. The Marketplace in Ispahan 04.22, 11:36
VI. Dance of the Prisoners 03.32, 16:14
VII. Negro Dance 04.33, 19:46

make music part of your life series: Aram Khachaturian: Spartacus – Ballet Suite No. 2


The monument of the composer Aram Khachaturian...

The monument of the composer Aram Khachaturian (1903 – 1978). http://www.armeniapedia.org/index.php?title=Aram_Khachaturian (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

[youtube.com/watch?v=ejJkB9De8Ek]

Aram Khachaturian: Spartacus – Ballet Suite No. 2

1. Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia
2. Entrance of Merchants, Dance of a Roman Courtesan, General Dance 8:52
3. Entrance of Spartacus, Quarrel, Harmodius’ Treachery 13:15
4. Dance of the Pirates 19:21

Scottish National Orchestra
Neeme Järvi – conductor

Mikhail Baryshnikov


Mikhail Baryshnikov

 

Mikhail Baryshnikov in New York, 1984.

Mikhail Baryshnikov in New York, 1984. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Baryshnikov is a world renowned Russian-American dancer and choreographer. He began studying dance in Riga, Latvia, where he was raised, and soon earned himself a coveted spot with the Kirov Ballet, one of the foremost ballet companies in Russia. In 1974, while on tour with the company, he defected to the West and joined the American Ballet Theatre, where he later served as artistic director. He has also tried his hand at acting and has appeared in a number of films and TV shows, such as what? More… Discuss

great composions/performances: SIR THOMAS BEECHAM & ‘FAUST’ Ballet Music by Charles Gounod


[youtube.com/watch?v=rA4hQdKm7iw]

SIR THOMAS BEECHAM & ‘FAUST’ Ballet Music by Charles Gounod

This wonderfully melodic ballet music is given a superb performance by Beecham & the Royal philharmonic, the orchestra he had founded during 1946. In their time, surely Sir Thomas & Pierre Monteux where inimitable here.

Irish Step Dance (IRISH DANCE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, BOSTON 2013)


Irish Step Dance

Irish step dance is a type of recreational and competitive folk dance whose tradition probably grew in tandem with Ireland’s rich tradition in music. It may be performed as a solo dance or in groups and is generally characterized by a stiff upper body and quick, precise footwork. Though it originated in Ireland, this style of dance has become popular around the globe, thanks in large part to the recent productions Riverdance and Lord of the Dance. Where did Riverdance debut? More… Discusst may be performed as a solo dance or in groups and is generally characterized by a stiff upper body and quick, precise footwork. Though it originated in Ireland, this style of dance has become popular around the globe, thanks in large part to the recent productions Riverdance and Lord of the Dance. Where did Riverdance debut? More… Discuss

[youtube.com/watch?v=gPylYGoquqM]

IRISH DANCE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, BOSTON 2013

 

Bone of Time, poetic thought by George-B (©Always)


Bone of Time, poetic thought by George-B (©Always)

I’m sitting in this old place
Sometimes,
Thinking about myself,
Imagining myself being
A few years younger,
Still in the safety of the 20th
Century, one hundred years, passed now,
The safety of the memories past …
The memorialistic past, pass double dance of the safe past,
When things turned out okay, and I survived that day and
That and this, days and nights and
sometimes mornings and afternoons,
boring times extraneously boring times of nothing but boredom,
and more boredom and
sometimes the “Hi How are you?”, “Great, thanks…’n how are you?”…

Yes I’m thinking sometimes of the safety of the memories past,
of the 20th century, with more substance on the bone of time,
and less of a hatchet to grind,
with less militantism, and more substance
on the bone of humanity,
on the bone of history,
on the etherical memories of the past.

make music part of your life series: Arvey-Francis Duo – “Oriental” Dance No.2 by Enrique Granados


[youtube.com/watch?v=4Cy-hxoI21M]

Arvey-Francis Duo – “Oriental” Dance No.2 by Enrique Granados

The Arvey-Francis Duo
Spanish Dance No. 2 “Oriental”
Music by Enrique Granados.
Performed by Evelyn Arvey and Mark Francis
Recorded November 10, 2010
Produced and Engineered by Kevin Callahan
Quaver Studios, Seattle WA
http://www.arveyfrancis.com

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Igor Stravinsky – Pétrouchka (1911)/ Mitropoulos


[youtube.com/watch?v=IW84HhzoodE]

Igor Stravinsky: Pétrouchka (1911)/ Mitropoulos

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971): Pétrouchka, balletto in quattro quadri (versione originale 1911) — New York Philharmonic diretta da Dimitri Mitropoulos

I. Fête populaire de la semaine grasse – Le tour de passe-passe – Danse russe
II. Chez Pétrouchka
III. Chez le maure – Danse de la ballerine – Valse. La ballerine et le maure
IV. Fête populaire de la semaine grasse (vers le soir) – Danse des nousnous – Danse des cochers et des palefreniers – Les déguisés

— cover image by Mikhail Fokine

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Camille Saint-Saëns – Danse Macabre



Danse Macabre (first performed in 1875) is the name of opus 40 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns.

The composition is based upon a poem by Henri Cazalis, on an old French superstition: Zig, zig, zig, Death in a cadence, Striking with his heel a tomb, Death at midnight plays a dance-tune, Zig, zig, zig, on his violin. The winter wind blows and the night is dark; Moans are heard in the linden trees. Through the gloom, white skeletons pass, Running and leaping in their shrouds. Zig, zig, zig, each one is frisking, The bones of the dancers are heard to crack— But hist! of a sudden they quit the round, They push forward, they fly; the cock has crowed.

According to the ancient superstition, “Death” appears at midnight every year on Halloween. Death has the power to call forth the dead from their graves to dance for him while he plays his fiddle (represented by a solo violin with its E-string tuned to an E-flat in an example of scordatura tuning). His skeletons dance for him until the first break of dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year.

The piece opens with a harp playing a single note, D, twelve times to signify the clock striking midnight, accompanied by soft chords from the string section. This then leads to the eerie E flat and A chords (also known as a tritone or the “Devil’s chord“) played by a solo violin, representing death on his fiddle. After which the main theme is heard on a solo flute and is followed by a descending scale on the solo violin. The rest of the orchestra, particularly the lower instruments of the string section, then joins in on the descending scale. The main theme and the scale is then heard throughout the various sections of the orchestra until it breaks to the solo violin and the harp playing the scale. The piece becomes more energetic and climaxes at this point; the full orchestra playing with strong dynamics.Towards the end of the piece, there is another violin solo, now modulating, which is then joined by the rest of the orchestra. The final section, a pianissimo, represents the dawn breaking and the skeletons returning to their graves.

The piece makes particular use of the xylophone in a particular theme to imitate the sounds of rattling bones. Saint-Saëns uses a similar motif in the Fossils part of his Carnival of the Animals.
[from Wikipedia]

Artwork:Remedios Varo,”Les Feuilles Mortes”.
Played by:National Philharmonic Orchestra,
conductor:Leopold Stokowski.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: SIR THOMAS BEECHAM & ‘FAUST’ Ballet Music by Charles Gounod



Make Music Part of Your Life Series: SIR THOMAS BEECHAM & ‘FAUST’ Ballet Music by Charles Gounod

This wonderfully melodic ballet music is given a superb performance by Beecham & the Royal philharmonic, the orchestra he had founded during 1946. In their time, surely Sir Thomas & Pierre Monteux where inimitable here.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Shostakovich: Ballet Suite No. 4


[youtube.com/watch?v=auH0YLmP5-E]
The Queer Urban Orchestra, under the direction of Nolan Dresden, performs Dmitri Shostakovich’s Ballet Suite No. 4 at our Mysterium concert, March 20, 2011. The work is in three movements: I – Introduction and Variations; II – Waitz; and III – Scherzo.

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ARTICLE: BALLROOM DANCE Ballroom Dance Video – 2011 Desert Classic Open Professional Ballroom Final


[youtube.com/watch?v=Skh2UMaMvyM&list=PL2E91135C1702D4D8]
1st Andrea Faraci [203] with Iveta Pauryte, 2nd Artem Plakhotnyi [187] with Inna Berlizyeva, 3rd Craig Shaw [217] with Evgeniya Sutyaginskaya, 4th Emanuele Pappacena [227] with Francesca Lazzari; 5th Ruslan Meshkov [167] with Alexandra Nema. Judges declined to call back six couples.

Ballroom Dance

Ballroom dance, a type of social dancing performed by couples, was once reserved for the privileged classes. But in the 20th century, husband-and-wife dance team Vernon and Irene Castle and film duo Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers brought it to the masses. In recent years, popular TV shows like Dancing with the Stars and So You Think You Can Dance have reignited interest in dances like the fox-trot, waltz, and tango. Which of these dances once sparked outrage for its impropriety? More…Discuss

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Aram Khachturian Adagio Spartacus and Phrygia, SYOA, Sergey Smbatyan



State Youth Orchestra of Armenia 
Principal Conductor and Artistic Director Sergey Smbatyan

Aram Khachaturian – Adagio Spartacus and Phrygia from the Ballet “Spartacus”
Aram Khachaturian International Violin Competition 2010 

http://www.syoa.am
http://www.akhic.am

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Joseph Boulogne, Le Chevalier de Saint-Georges – L’amant anonyme (1780) – Ballet no 1



Joseph Boulogne (1745 – 1799) was the son of a French aristocrat and an African slave woman. He is considered to be one of the first composers to write music in the western tradition with African ancestry. Here is part of a ballet he wrote in 1780. Performed by Tafelmusik Orchestra conducted by Jeanne Lamon.

 

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WORD: ARDOR


ardor 

Definition: (noun) Feelings of great warmth and intensity.
Synonyms: fervencyfire
Usage: He spoke with great ardor at the rally, inspiring the crowd with his passionate words. Discuss.

 

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Right Brain vs. Left Brain


Right Brain vs. Left Brain

Do you see the dancer turning clockwise or anti-clockwise?

According to this article, if you see the girl turning clockwise, then you use more of the right side of the brain and vice versa.

Most of us would see the dancer turning anti-clockwise though you can try to focus and change the direction; see if you can do it.

(When I first look at it, I see the dancer turning clockwise, but after a few seconds, it flips to counterclockwise, go figure.)
I started by seeing the girl spinning clockwise (from left to right) and then anti clockwise: THis is a good exercise to keep your brain alert, and balanced: share it with your grandparents too!SpinningGirl

 

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TODAY HOLIDAY: SAN ILDEFONSO PUEBLO FEAST DAY


 

 

San Ildefonso Pueblo Feast Day

 

English: Tewas in headdress, male and female, ...

English: Tewas in headdress, male and female, descending stairs, “Dance, San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico.”; From the series Ansel Adams Photographs of National Parks and Monuments, compiled 1941 – 1942, documenting the period ca. 1933 – 1942. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

These late-January festivities mark a highlight in the ceremonial year at San Ildefonso Pueblo near Santa Fe, New Mexico. January 23 is the pueblo’s feast day, celebrated with a special church service and dances, such as the BuffaloComanche, and Deer dances. The dances are a way of paying respect and giving thanks for the animals on which people depend for food and other materials. On the evening before, there are bonfires and a firelight procession. More… Discuss

 

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances / Danses Norvégiennes



Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), Norge

– Danses norvegiénnes (pour orchestre), op. 35
– Norwegian Dances (for Orchestra), Op. 35

I. Allegro marcato
II. Allegro tranquille e grazioso
III. Allegro moderato alla marcia
IV. Allegro molto

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi

 

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ARTICLE: THE MAYPOLE


The Maypole

The maypole is the center of activity during the celebration of May Day. The tall wooden pole is often decorated with flowers, greenery, and streamers. Dancers hold the loose ends of the streamers and weave intricate patterns as they encircle the pole and pass each other in dance. May Day festivities also include a May king and queen and people carrying garlands. The maypole probably originated in ancient fertility rites, but its symbolism has long been debated. What are some interpretations? More…Discuss

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Alexander Glazunov “Ruses d’Amour” Op.61, Yevgeny Svetlanov



Alexander Glazunov Ruses d’Amour Op.61

1. Introduction 
2. Scene 1 
3. Mimic Recitative
4. Gavotte
5. Sarabande 
6. Farandole
7. Scene 2 
8. Puppet Dance
9. Scene 3 
10. Scene 4 
11. Scene 5
12. Variation 
13. Scene 6. March
14. Scene 7. Grand waltz
15. Scene 8 
16. Scene 9
17. Scene 10
18. Scene 11
19. Short Peasant’s Dance
20. Dance of the Groom and the Bride
21. Variation
22. Fricassee

Yevgeny Svetlanov,  Conductor

For  a complete  list of Glasunov’s composition visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_compositions_by_Alexander_Glazunov

Mozart – 3 German Dances, K. 605



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart‘s Three German Dances (Teutsche), K. 605, are a set of three dance pieces composed by Mozart in 1791. Most of Mozart’s German Dances were written whilst he held the position of Kammermusicus (Imperial Chamber Composer) in Vienna. Mozart had been appointed to this position on the 1st December 1787 by Emperor Joseph II. The position was offered following the death of the former Kammermusicus, Christoph Willibald Gluck on 15 November 1787. In the position Mozart earned 800 Florins a year. One of the main obligations of his position was to write music for the court dances and balls that were held in the Redoutensaal (Public Ballrooms) of the Imperial Palace in Vienna. Mozart was an enthusiastic dancer, and produced many dance works, including ten sets of German dances. The first set was written in February 1787, before Mozart’s appointment to Kammermusicus. The other sets, excluding K. 611, were written between December 1787 and 1791, during which Mozart also wrote well known pieces such as Symphonies 40 and 41, and his opera Così fan tutte. These were mostly written in sets of six, with one set of four and one of twelve. Mozart composed this set of three Teutsche (German Dances) in the early months of 1791. The three dances of K. 605 are usually listed with the six dances of K. 600 and the four of K. 602 as Dreizehn deutsche Tänze (Thirteen German Dances). The pieces first appear on 12 February 1791 on Mozart’s List of all my Works, and are the penultimate set of German Dances that Mozart would compose before his death on 5 December 1791. The dances are scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, violins I and II, violoncellos, and double basses. The third dance uniquely adds two posthorns and five sleigh bells tuned to C, E, F, G, and A (in ascending order). As the name “Three German Dances” suggests, this set of dances includes three individual dances. Each dance changes in instrumentation; only the violins play in all three dances. Each dance varies in character because of this, and each includes various features:
-Dance 1: The first dance begins with a series of repeating phrases that have a rich texture and are emphasised by the violins. Small, light fanfares can be heard throughout the piece being played by the trumpets. At the end of the dance the main theme from the beginning of the dance is repeated in a characterful ending.
-Dance 2: The main tune is once again played by the violins at the beginning, and this main tune is repeated, as is the next phrase. However, this repeat is played at a lower dynamic. The main tune then passes on to a characterful woodwind section. This is followed by an almost waltz-like phrase which has a clear, steady beat that could have easily been danced to.
-Dance 3 Schlittenfahrt: This dance may have been written independently of the others, as it is very different in style. Schlittenfahrt means “Sleigh Ride“; the use of sleigh bells in the piece clearly emphasises this. Before the sleigh bells enter, there is a series of repeating phrases that pass between the trumpets, woodwind and violins. The topography of the dynamics of the tuned sleigh bells make the piece seem like a sleigh ride, as the dynamics rise and fall like a sleigh would over snow. This is followed by a beautiful but simple trumpet solo that gives a very peaceful and clear atmosphere to the piece, like a winter’s day. The original repeating phrases then return, but end with a majestic fanfare from the trumpets that passes to the other instruments, then returns to the sleigh bells and trumpet solo again. The piece ends with a diminuendo of the trumpet solo.
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
—————————————-­———————————
NOTE: I do not know who the performers of this are, nor the place and date of recording!!! Any suggestions are welcome.

 

Manuel de Falla – La Vida Breve (Spanish Dance No.1) Orchestral


Manuel de Falla – La Vida Breve (Spanish Dance No.1) Orchestral

 

J. S. Bach: Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B minor, BWV 1067



J. S. Bach: Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B minor, BWV 1067
Viktória Gárdai – Flute
Pannon Philharmonic Orchestra
András Vass
LIVE RECORDING 
Kodály Centre, Pécs, 2012 02 04
Sound engineer: László Dobos
http://www.andrasvass.com
http://calartists.mymcn.org/avass.html
http://www.pfz.hu/en/a-zenekar/perman…

Ouverture
Rondeau
Sarabande
Bourrée I/II
Polonaise (Lentement) — Double
Minuet
Badinerie

 

Haiku – Cyan Flamenco (poetic thought by George-B)


Haiku – Cyan Flamenco (poetic thought by George-B)

Cyan flamenco
assumes the steel-toe rhythm
and castanets‘ tocks.

 

Magenta Flamenco oil Painting Digital (my Art Collection) 32X41- FotoSketch

Cyan Flamenco oil Painting Digital (my Art Collection) 32X41- FotoSketch

 

 

Great Performances – At the Opera: Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake – The Kirov Ballet [YouTube: Published on Mar 7, 2012 – 3,088,451]



In this production of the best loved classical ballet ‘Swan Lake’ the naturally gifted Yulia Makhalina dances the challenging role of Odette/Odile while the part of Prince Siegfried is danced by Igor Zelensky. This classic Kirov production includes the familiar happy ending in the final act where Siegfried fights and ultimately defeats the evil magician von Rothbart and at dawn is reunited with Odette.

Buy from Amazon:
http://smarturl.it/KirovSwanLakeAmazon

http://www.warnerclassics.com/

 

Gian Carlo Menotti – Sebastian (1944) ballet suite (very enticing music: Tonight, Dancing!)



Gian Carlo Menotti (1911-2007)
Sebastian Suite (1944), ballet

I. Introduction
II. Barcarole
III. Street Fight
IV. Cortege
V. Sebastian’s Dance 0:00
VI. Dance of the Wounded Courtesan 2:36
VII. Pavane 7:17

Spoleto Festival Orchestra/Richard Hickox

Menotti composed this ballet score to his own libretto in 1944. The choreography of the original production was considered unsuccessful, but with restagings later it became a success. Sebastian is a Moorish slave, secretly in love with a courtesan. She, in her turn, shares love with the Prince of their Italian kingdom. The prince’s sisters, desiring to end the affair, steal the courtesan’s veil, which allows them to work black magic on her, which they can do with a life-sized wax figure covered with the veil; firing arrows into it will kill her. Sebastian learns of the plot, substitutes himself for the wax figure, and is shot with the arrows. The sacrifice breaks their spell over the courtesan, and she is reunited with her beloved. 
Menotti’s music is ardent and romantic, sort of an Italian Prokofiev in style and sound. It is very listenable, a fine score of its type. When the work was first heard in New York, critic, Mark Schubart, reporting for The New York Times stated that the music “is prettily orchestrated, and the more violent portions are filled with elaborate percussion effects, flutter-tonguing on the brasses and carefully balanced, effective sonorities.” He noted also the “attractive melodies, simple in intent and immediate in appeal”. There is a suite in seven movements drawn from the score.

Picture: “Martyrdom of St Sebastian” (detail) by Antonio Giorgetti (pre-1670)

 

Unique moments in Movies: Anna Karenina: Dmitri Shostakovich Waltz No 2.


Hotel California: The Astonishing Philosophical Poem from The Eagles


Hotel California
On a dark desert highway, cool wind in my hair

Warm smell of colitas, rising up through the air
Up ahead in the distance, I saw a shimmering light
My head grew heavy and my sight grew dim
I had to stop for the night
There she stood in the doorway;
I heard the mission bell
And I was thinking to myself,
’this could be heaven or this could be hell’
Then she lit up a candle and she showed me the way
There were voices down the corridor,
I thought I heard them say…

Welcome to the hotel california
Such a lovely place
Such a lovely face
Plenty of room at the hotel california
Any time of year, you can find it here

Her mind is tiffany-twisted, she got the mercedes bends
She got a lot of pretty, pretty boys, that she calls friends
How they dance in the courtyard, sweet summer sweat.
Some dance to remember, some dance to forget

So I called up the captain,
’please bring me my wine’
He said, ’we haven’t had that spirit here since nineteen sixty nine’
And still those voices are calling from far away,
Wake you up in the middle of the night
Just to hear them say…

Welcome to the hotel california
Such a lovely place
Such a lovely face
They livin’ it up at the hotel california
What a nice surprise, bring your alibis

Mirrors on the ceiling,
The pink champagne on ice
And she said ’we are all just prisoners here, of our own device’
And in the master’s chambers,
They gathered for the feast
The stab it with their steely knives,
But they just can’t kill the beast

Last thing I remember, I was
Running for the door
I had to find the passage back
To the place I was before
’relax,’ said the night man,
We are programmed to receive.
You can checkout any time you like,
But you can never leave!

The lyrics describe the title establishment as a luxury resort where “you can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave.” On the surface, it tells the tale of a weary traveler who becomes trapped in a nightmarish luxury hotel that at first appears inviting and tempting. The song is an allegory about hedonism and self-destruction in the music industry of the late 1970s; Don Henley called it “our interpretation of the high life in Los Angeles[7] and later reiterated “it’s basically a song about the dark underbelly of the American dream and about excess in America, which is something we knew a lot about.”[8] In 2008, Don Felder described the origins of the lyrics:

“Don Henley and Glenn wrote most of the words. All of us kind of drove into L.A. at night. Nobody was from California, and if you drive into L.A. at night… you can just see this glow on the horizon of lights, and the images that start running through your head of Hollywood and all the dreams that you have, and so it was kind of about that… what we started writing the song about. Coming into L.A…. and from that ‘Life in the Fast Lane‘ came out of it, and ‘Wasted Time’ and a bunch of other songs.”[9]

The abstract nature of the lyrics has led listeners to their own interpretations over the years. In the 1980s, some Christian evangelists alleged that “Hotel California” referred to a San Francisco hotel purchased by Anton LaVey and converted into the Church of Satan.[10][11] Other rumors suggested that the Hotel California was the Camarillo State Mental Hospital.[12] These claims have been consistently denied by the band.[citation needed]

The term “colitas” in the first stanza of the song is a Spanish term for “little tails” and in Mexican slang it is a reference to the buds of the Cannabis plant.[13]

In a 2009 interview, Plain Dealer music critic John Soeder asked Don Henley this about the lyrics:

On “Hotel California,” you sing: “So I called up the captain / ‘Please bring me my wine’ / He said, ‘We haven’t had that spirit here since 1969.'” I realize I’m probably not the first to bring this to your attention, but wine isn’t a spirit. Wine is fermented; spirits are distilled. Do you regret that lyric?

Henley responded,

“Thanks for the tutorial and, no, you’re not the first to bring this to my attention—and you’re not the first to completely misinterpret the lyric and miss the metaphor. Believe me, I’ve consumed enough alcoholic beverages in my time to know how they are made and what the proper nomenclature is. But that line in the song has little or nothing to do with alcoholic beverages. It’s a sociopolitical statement. My only regret would be having to explain it in detail to you, which would defeat the purpose of using literary devices in songwriting and lower the discussion to some silly and irrelevant argument about chemical processes.”[14]

According to Glenn Frey‘s liner notes for The Very Best of Eagles, the use of the word “steely” in the lyric (referring to knives) was a playful nod to band Steely Dan, who had included the lyric “Turn up the Eagles, the neighbors are listening” in their song “Everything You Did“. (Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hotel_California_(song))

Today’s Birthday: Fres Astaire (MAy 10, 1899)


Fred Astaire (1899)

Born Frederick Austerlitz, Astaire was an American dancer, actor, and singer who began his career as a child on a successful Broadway vaudeville team with his sister Adele. After his sister retired, Astaire became a film actor and developed a reputation as a debonair song-and-dance man, particularly in the films he made with Ginger Rogers, which elevated tap dance to an elegant, disciplined art and revolutionized popular-dance performance. What were some of Astaire’s most popular films? More… Discuss

ABBA: Thank you for the music



Song- Thank You For The Music
Composer- Benny Andersson
Performed By- ABBA
Album- Gold: Greatest Hits
Lyrics
I’m nothing special, in fact I’m a bit of a bore
If I tell a joke, you’ve probably heard it before
But I have a talent, a wonderful thing
’cause everyone listens when I start to sing
I’m so grateful and proud
All I want is to sing it out loud

So I say
Thank you for the music, the songs I’m singing
Thanks for all the joy they’re bringing
Who can live without it, I ask in all honesty
What would life be?
Without a song or a dance what are we?
So I say thank you for the music
For giving it to me

Mother says I was a dancer before I could walk
She says I began to sing long before I could talk
And I’ve often wondered, how did it all start?
Who found out that nothing can capture a heart
Like a melody can?
Well, whoever it was, I’m a fan

So I say
Thank you for the music, the songs I’m singing
Thanks for all the joy they’re bringing
Who can live without it, I ask in all honesty
What would life be?
Without a song or a dance what are we?
So I say thank you for the music
For giving it to me

I’ve been so lucky, I am the girl with golden hair
I wanna sing it out to everybody
What a joy, what a life, what a chance!

So I say
Thank you for the music, the songs I’m singing
Thanks for all the joy they’re bringing
Who can live without it, I ask in all honesty
What would life be?
Without a song or a dance what are we?
So I say thank you for the music
For giving it to me
So I say thank you for the music
For giving it to me