Tag Archives: David Oistrakh

Historic Musical Bits: David Oistrakh – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 3 in G major, K 216


David Oistrakh – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 3 in G major, K 216

historic musical bits: David Oistrakh – Brahms – Violin Sonata No 2 in A major, Op 100


David Oistrakh – Brahms – Violin Sonata No 2 in A major, Op 100

historic musical bits: David Oistrakh plays Variations on a theme of Corelli


David Oistrakh plays Variations on a theme of Corelli

Historic Musical Bits: David Oistrakh plays Variations on a theme of Corelli


David Oistrakh plays Variations on a theme of Corelli

Historic musical bits, Mozart Violin Concerto N°4 in D major, K218. David Oistrakh, violin, great compositons/performances


Mozart Violin Concerto N°4 in D major, K 218. David Oistrakh, violin )

Oistrakh plays Wieniawski Legende in G minor, op.17: great compositions/performances


Oistrakh plays Wieniawski Legende in G minor, op.17

Tchaikovsky-Violin Concerto in D Major Op. 35: Great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky-Violin Concerto in D Major Op. 35 (Complete)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
 

The Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, was written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1878. It is one of the best known violin concertos, and is considered one of the most technically difficult works for the violin.

Tchaikovsky.gif

Composition

Tchaikovsky (right) with violinist Iosif Kotek

The piece was written in Clarens, a Swiss resort on the shores of Lake Geneva, where Tchaikovsky had gone to recover from the depression brought on by his disastrous marriage to Antonina Miliukova. He was working on his Piano Sonata in G major but finding it heavy going. Presently he was joined there by his composition pupil, the violinist Iosif Kotek, who had been in Berlin for violin studies with Joseph Joachim. The two played works for violin and piano together, including a violin-and-piano arrangement of Édouard Lalo‘s Symphonie espagnole, which they may have played through the day after Kotek’s arrival. This work may have been the catalyst for the composition of the concerto.[1] He wrote to his patroness Nadezhda von Meck, “It [the Symphonie espagnole] has a lot of freshness, lightness, of piquant rhythms, of beautiful and excellently harmonized melodies…. He [Lalo], in the same way as Léo Delibes and Bizet, does not strive after profundity, but he carefully avoids routine, seeks out new forms, and thinks more about musical beauty than about observing established traditions, as do the Germans.”[2] Tchaikovsky authority Dr. David Brown writes that Tchaikovsky “might almost have been writing the prescription for the violin concerto he himself was about to compose.”[3]

Tchaikovsky made swift, steady progress on the concerto, as by this point in his rest cure he had regained his inspiration, and the work was completed within a month despite the middle movement getting a complete rewrite (a version of the original movement was preserved as the first of the three pieces for violin and piano, Souvenir d’un lieu cher).[4] Since Tchaikovsky was not a violinist, he sought the advice of Kotek on the completion of the solo part.[5] “How lovingly he’s busying himself with my concerto!” Tchaikovsky wrote to his brother Anatoly on the day he completed the new slow movement. “It goes without saying that I would have been able to do nothing without him. He plays it marvelously.”[6]

David Oistrakh plays Kodaly Three Hungarian Dances 1954 (great compositions/performances)


David Oistrakh plays Kodaly Three Hungarian Dances 1954

David Oistrakh (1908-1974), Russian violinist

Zoltan Kodaly (1882-1967)
Drei Ungarische Tanze (Three Hungarian Dances)

Naum Walter, piano

Recorded in 1954

make music part of your life series: Jules Massenet – Le Cid – Ouverture


[youtube.com/watch?v=5yHC4CRTuUQ]

Jules MassenetLe Cid – Ouverture
Work: Le Cid, opéra in four acts, first performance 30 November 1885, Opéra, Paris.
***Libretto: Adolphe Philippe d’Ennery/Louis***

***Gallet/Edouard Blau after Pierre Corneille***
Ouverture
***Orchestra: Opera Orchestra of New York***
***Conductor: Eve Queler***

 

 

Great Compositions/Performance: Trio in E minor Op.90 “Dumky”, Oistrakh, Oborin, Knushevitsky


A. Dvořák, Trio in E minor Op.90 “Dumky“, Oistrakh, Oborin, Knushevitsky

1. Lento maestoso
2. Andante – Vivace non troppo
3. Andante moderato
4. Allegro
5. Lento maestoso – Vivace

David Oistrakh Violin
Lev Oborin Piano
Sviatoslav Knushevitsky Violoncello

 

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Great Performances: David Oistrakh – Mozart – Violin Sonata No 32 in B flat major, K 454



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Violin Sonata No 32 in B flat major, K 454

1 Largo – Allegro
2 Andante
3 Allegretto

David Oistrakh, violin
Paul Badura-Skoda, piano

 

A. Dvořák, Trio in E minor Op.90 “Dumky”, Oistrakh, Oborin, Knushevitsky



A. Dvořák, Trio in E minor Op.90 “Dumky”, Oistrakh, Oborin, Knushevitsky

1. Lento maestoso
2. Andante – Vivace non troppo
3. Andante moderato
4. Allegro
5. Lento maestoso – Vivace

David Oistrakh Violin
Lev Oborin Piano
Sviatoslav Knushevitsky Violoncello

 

Ion Voicu – Balada de Ciprian Porumbescu



Ion Voicu (October 8, 1923–February 24, 1997) was a Romanian violinist and orchestral conductor. 

Hundreds of excellent concerts all over the world have brought out in bold relief Ion Voicu’s brilliancy as a Romanian violinist of international reputation, one of the greatest masters of our time. Continue reading

Great Music- in Best Hands: Oistrakh – Oborin – Beethoven Violin Sonata No.4, Op.23



00:00 – Presto
05:37 – Andante scherzoso, piu allegretto
12:05 – Allegro molto

Bach / David and Igor Oistrakh, 1961: Double Concerto in D minor, BWV 1043, Goossens, Malcolm



David and Igor Oistrakh are soloists, and Sir Eugene Goossens leads the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra of London, in this 1961 performance of Bach’s Concerto for two violins, strings and continuo in D minor, BWV 1043. George Malcolm plays the harpsichord. 

From the LP you see above, issued in 1962 on the DG label, serial number 138 820. Jacket is at 5:08; label is at 13:04. Images of Bach and excerpts from the score (1:4512:0916:14) are interspersed throughout. Images from the reverse side of the LP jacket begin at16:40.

1. Vivace
2. Largo ma non tanto (4:07)
3. Allegro (11:27)

You can hear this father/son duo in a performance of this same work, recorded in 1957 with Rudolf Barshai conducting, here:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ceHVl0…

More from the Oistrakhs: Continue reading

David Oistrakh – Beethoven – Violin Concerto in D major, Op 61 – Kondrashin



Ludwig van Beethoven
Violin Concerto in D major, Op 61

  0:00 -1 Allegro ma non troppo  (D major)
18:30 –  Cadenza  (wonderful interpretation that I held always dear)
22:49 – 2 Larghetto (G major)
31:33  – 3 Rondo. Allegro (D major)

David Oistrakh, violin
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra
Kirill Kondrashin, conductor

From Wikipedia: Cadenzas for the work have been written by several notable violinists, including Joachim. The cadenzas by Fritz Kreisler are probably most often employed. More recently, composer Alfred Schnittke provided controversial cadenzas with a characteristically 20th-century flavor; violinist Gidon Kremer has recorded the concerto with the Schnittke cadenzas.[4] New Klezmer-inspired cadenzas written by Airat Ichmatourov for Alexandre Da Costa in 2011 have been recorded by the Taipei Symphony Orchestra for Warner Classics and will be released in 2013.

The following violinists and composers have written cadenzas: Continue reading

Beethoven-Violin Sonata op.12 № 3. David Oistrakh (violin), Sviatoslav Richter (piano) 1970



Beethoven-Violin Sonata op.12 № 3. David Oistrakh (violin), Sviatoslav Richter (piano) 1970

The Violin Sonata No. 3 of Ludwig van Beethoven in E-flat major, the third of his Opus 12 set, was written in 1798 and dedicated to Antonio Salieri. It has three movements:

  1. Allegro con spirito
  2. Adagio con molta espressione
  3. Rondo: Allegro molto

 

(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violin_Sonata_No._3_(Beethoven)