Tag Archives: David

Michelangelo’s David Has an Achilles Heel


Michelangelo’s David Has an Achilles Heel

Well, technically, it is more like Achilles ankles. Experts say the Renaissance masterpiece is at risk of collapsing under its own weight because of the stress placed on the sculpture’s weak ankles. Micro-fractures and cracks are appearing in both of David‘s legs as well as the carved tree stump behind the figure’s right leg. Though it might escape the layman’s eye, the statue is carved of poor quality marble. This, compounded by the centuries-old statue’s great weight—upward of 6 tons—and off-center pose, means that an earthquake or even nearby roadwork could cause the figure to topple. More… Discuss

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A Tuesday Cinemateque Matinee: “If it’s Tuesday”


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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
If It's Tuesday.jpeg

Video cover
Directed by Mel Stuart
Produced by Stan Margulies & David L. Wolper
Written by David Shaw
Starring Suzanne Pleshette
Ian McShane
Music by Walter Scharf
Cinematography Vilis Lapenieks
Editing by David Saxon
Distributed by United Artists
Release dates
  • April 24, 1969
Running time 99 min
Country United States
Language English
Box office $6,000,000[1]

If It’s Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium is a 1969 romantic comedy film made by Wolper Pictures and released by United Artists. It was directed by Mel Stuart, filmed on location throughout Europe, and features many cameo appearances from various stars.

The title, also used by a 1965 documentary on CBS television that filmed one such tour, was taken from a New Yorker cartoon by Leonard Dove. Published in the June 22, 1957, issue of the magazine, the cartoon depicts a young woman near a tour bus and a campanile, frustratedly exclaiming “But if it’s Tuesday, it _has_ to be Siena.”, thereby humorously illustrating the whirlwind nature of European tour schedules. This concept formed the premise of the film’s plot.

The film was remade in 1987 as a made-for-TV movie titled If It’s Tuesday, It Still Must Be Belgium.
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Synopsis

Charlie (Ian McShane) is an English tour guide who takes groups of Americans on whirlwind 18-day sightseeing tours of Europe. Among his various clients on his latest trip are Samantha (Suzanne Pleshette) with whom he wants to have an affair; a man who desires a pair of custom-made Italian shoes from a certain cobbler in Rome; and a vet who is reliving his World War II experiences.

Cast

The film also has cameo appearances by Senta Berger, John Cassavetes, Joan Collins, Vittorio De Sica, Anita Ekberg, Ben Gazzara, Virna Lisi, Elsa Martinelli, Catherine Spaak and Robert Vaughn. Folk singer Donovan makes a guest appearance in the film singing Lord of the Reedy River, which he had also written. He also wrote the film’s title song, performed by J.P. Rags. J.P. Rags is a pseudonym for Douglas Cox. The then current Miss Belgium, Sonya Doumen, also appears.

Locations

  • Locations where the film was shot include Rome and Venice, Italy; Brussels and Bastogne, Belgium; the Netherlands; Switzerland; and London, England. The film poster shows the cast on the normally pedestrianized Grote Markt square of Antwerp, Belgium, posing for a typical souvenir photo in front of the city hall, with their tour bus obstructing the view of the Brabo fountain which is normally a favorite photo-op with other tourists.

Reception

The film earned estimated rentals of $3 million in North America during its initial run.[2]

 

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TODAY’S SAINT: ST. JOSEEPH – Feastday: March 19 Patron of the Universal Church


Image of St. Joseph

St. Joseph

Feastday: March 19

Patron of the Universal Church

Everything we know about the husband of Mary and the foster father of Jesus comes from Scriptureand that has seemed too little for those who made up legends about him.

We know he was a carpenter, a working man, for the skeptical Nazarenes ask about Jesus, “Is this not the carpenter’s son?” (Matthew 13:55). He wasn’t rich for when he took Jesus to the Temple to be circumcised and Mary to be purified he offered the sacrifice of two turtledoves or a pair of pigeons, allowed only for those who could not afford a lamb (Luke 2:24).

Despite his humble work and means, Joseph came from a royal lineage. Luke and Matthew disagree some about the details of Joseph’s genealogy but they both mark his descent from David, the greatest king of Israel (Matthew 1:1-16 and Luke 3:23-38). Indeed the angel who first tells Joseph about Jesusgreets him as “son of David,” a royal title used also for Jesus.

We know Joseph was a compassionate, caring man. When he discovered Mary was pregnant after they had been betrothed, he knew the child was not his but was as yet unaware that she was carrying the Son of God. He planned to divorce Mary according to the law but he was concerned for her suffering and safety. He knew that women accused to adultery could be stoned to death, so he decided to divorce her quietly and not expose her to shame or cruelty (Matthew 1:19-25).

We know Joseph was man of faith, obedient to whatever God asked of him without knowing the outcome. When the angel came to Joseph in a dream and told him the truth about the child Mary was carrying, Joseph immediately and without question or concern for gossip, took Mary as his wife. When the angel came again to tell him that his family was in danger, he immediately left everything he owned, all his family and friends, and fled to a strange country with his young wife and the baby. He waited inEgypt without question until the angel told him it was safe to go back (Matthew 2:13-23).

We know Joseph loved Jesus. His one concern was for the safety of this child entrusted to him. Not only did he leave his home to protect Jesus, but upon his return settled in the obscure town of Nazarethout of fear for his life. When Jesus stayed in the Temple we are told Joseph (along with Mary) searched with great anxiety for three days for him (Luke 2:48). We also know that Joseph treated Jesus as his own son for over and over the people of Nazareth say of Jesus, “Is this not the son of Joseph?” (Luke 4:22)

We know Joseph respected God. He followed God’s commands in handling the situation with Mary and going to Jerusalem to have Jesus circumcised and Mary purified after Jesus’ birth. We are told that he took his family to Jerusalem every year for Passover, something that could not have been easy for a working man.

Since Joseph does not appear in Jesus’ public life, at his death, or resurrection, many historians believeJoseph probably had died before Jesus entered public ministry.

Joseph is the patron of the dying because, assuming he died before Jesus’ public life, he died withJesus and Mary close to him, the way we all would like to leave this earth.

Joseph is also patron of the universal Church, fathers, carpenters, and social justice.

We celebrate two feast days for Joseph: March 19 for Joseph the Husband of Mary and May 1 forJoseph the Worker.

There is much we wish we could know about Joseph — where and when he was born, how he spent his days, when and how he died. But Scripture has left us with the most important knowledge: who he was — “a righteous man” (Matthew 1:18).

In His Footsteps:Joseph was foster father to Jesus. There are many children separated from families and parents who need foster parents. Please consider contacting your local Catholic Charities or Division of FamilyServices about becoming a foster parent.

Prayer:Saint Joseph, patron of the universal Church, watch over the Church as carefully as you watched over Jesus, help protect it and guide it as you did with your adopted son. Amen

March
19

 

 

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SAINT FOR MARCH 1: St. David


St. DavidSt. David

Feastday:
 March 1 

 According to tradition, St. David was the son of King Sant of SouthWales and St. Non. He was ordained a priest and later studied under St. Paulinus. Later, he was involved in missionary work and founded a number of monasteries. The monastery he founded atMenevia in Southwestern Wales was noted for extreme asceticism. David and his monks drank neither wine nor beer – only water – while putting in a full day of heavy manual labor and intense study. Around the year 550, David attended a synod at Brevi in Cardiganshire. His contributions at the synod are said to have been the major cause for his election as primate of the Cambrian Church. He was reportedly consecrated archbishop by thepatriarch of Jerusalem while on a visit to the Holy Land. He also is said to have invoked a council that ended the last vestiges of Pelagianism. David died at his monastery in Menevia around the year 589, and his cult was approved in 1120 by Pope Callistus II. He is revered as the patron of Wales. Undoubtedly, St. David was endowed with substantial qualities of spiritual leadership. What is more, many monasteries flourished as a result of his leadership and good example. His staunch adherence to monastic piety bespeaks a fine example for modern Christians seeking order andform in their prayer life.His feast day is March 1.

 

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WORD: COGNOSCENTE


cognoscente 

Definition: (noun) A person with superior, usually specialized knowledge or highly refined taste.
Synonyms: connoisseur
Usage: I may not be a cognoscente of art, but I know talent when I see it, and this painter has it in spades. Discuss.

 

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Vespasian Psalter at British Library (visit The British Library here)


Vespasian Psalter_ British Lybrary_25668_2

Vespasian Psalter_ British Library_25668_2 (click to access Website)

“In Anglo-Saxon EnglandJerome’s first translation of the Psalms, the Roman version, continued to be copied, and this is the earliest surviving example of it. An Old English translation was added in the ninth century above the Latin text; this addition is the oldest extant translation into English of any biblical text. This copy was made in Kent in the first half of the eighth century, perhaps at Canterbury. As in the Lindisfarne Gospels, the frame around the picture incorporates spirals of Celtic origin. On the right is the beginning of Psalm 27 (in modern numbering) with an initial D(ominus) (Lord) with an image David with Jonathan, the earliest surviving English biblical example of an initial with a narrative scene.”

Frederick Delius: Brigg Fair by Sir Charles Mackerras



Frederick Delius (1862-1934)

Brigg Fair“, an “English rhapsody” (1907)

Orchestra of the Welsh National Opera
by Sir Charles Mackerras
1990

 

Today’s Birthday: JACQUES-LOUIS DAVID (1748)


Jacques-Louis David (1748)

The unchallenged painter of the French Revolution, and later the official portraitist to Napoleon, David was the virtual art dictator of France for a generation. His pervasive influence on European art extended beyond painting to determine the course of fashion, interior decoration, and even the development of moral philosophy. Although he was a talented portraitist, David is best known for his paintings of classical, historical, and mythological themes. What are some of his most famous works?More… Discuss

 

Leonard Perla Batalla sings Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah with Port Hueneme’s Evangelistic Missionary gospel choir



Hallelujah (Leonard Cohen)
I’ve heard there was a secret chord
That David played, and it pleased the Lord
But you don’t really care for music, do you?
It goes like this
The fourth, the fifth
The minor fall, the major lift
The baffled king composing Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

Your faith was strong but you needed proof
You saw her bathing on the roof
Her beauty in the moonlight overthrew you
She tied you to a kitchen chair
She broke your throne, and she cut your hair
And from your lips she drew the Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

Baby I have been here before
I know this room, I’ve walked this floor
I used to live alone before I knew you.
I’ve seen your flag on the marble arch
Love is not a victory march
It’s a cold and it’s a broken Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

There was a time when you let me know
What’s really going on below
But now you never show it to me, do you?
And remember when I moved in you
The holy dove was moving too
And every breath we drew was Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

Maybe there’s a God above
But all I’ve ever learned from love
Was how to shoot at someone who outdrew you
It’s not a cry you can hear at night
It’s not somebody who has seen the light
It’s a cold and it’s a broken Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

You say I took the name in vain
I don’t even know the name
But if I did, well really, what’s it to you?
There’s a blaze of light in every word
It doesn’t matter which you heard
The holy or the broken Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah

I did my best, it wasn’t much
I couldn’t feel, so I tried to touch
I’ve told the truth, I didn’t come to fool you
And even though it all went wrong
I’ll stand before the Lord of Song
With nothing on my tongue but Hallelujah

Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah, Hallelujah
Hallelujah

“Aleluia” (Leonard Cohen)
Tradus de Windows live, Talmacit de George

 Am auzit c-a existat o coardă secrete
Ce David a jucat, si-a placut Domnului
Dar tie nu-ti pasa de muzică, asa-i?
Suna cam asa
A patra, a cincea
Minorul coborator, majorul suitor
Uimit regele compunerea Hallelujah

 Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia

 Credinţa ti-a fost puternica dar ti-a trebuit dovada
Ai văzut-o facand baie pe acoperiş
Frumusetea ei în lumina lunii te-a răsturnat
Ea legatu-te-a pe-un scaun din bucătărie
Ti-a frint tronul  şi ti-a tăiat părul
Şi de pe buze ea ti-a stors Hallelujah

 Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia

Draguta am mai  fost pe-aici
Ştiu incaperea, am batut podeaua
Trăiam de unul singur înainte de-a te fi ştiut.

Ti-am vazut steagul pe arcul de marmura
Dragostea nu este un mars de victorie
Este un rece şi  un frînt Hallelujah

Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia

 Era un timp când imi spuneai
Ce se întâmplă  acolo jos
Dara acum nu-mi mai arăti, nu-i asa?
Şi-ti amintesti atunci când ma miscam în tine
Spiritul  mişcat si el
Şi-n fiecare respiratie era un Hallelujah

 Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia

Poate că există un Dumnezeu sus
Dar tot ce-am învăţat deespre dragoste
A fost cum să trag in cel ce e mai lent
Nu e un strigăt ce-l auzi in noapte
Nu e cel ce-a văzut Lumina
Este doar un rece şi un frînt Hallelujah

 Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia

Tu zici ca-m luat Numele-n zadar
Nici macar nu-i ştiu Numele
Dar dacă-as fi facut, ce-ti pasa ţie?
E o lumină sclipitoare-n fiece cuvânt
Nu importa  pe cel ce l-ai auzit
Pe sfantul sau frîntul Hallelujah

 Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia

 M-am straduit cît am putut de bine, n-a fost de-ajuns
Nu am putut simţi, aşa ca-m încercat s-ating
Iti spun adevărul, nu am venit să te mint
Şi chiar dacă  totul e gresit
Eu pot sa  stau in fata Lordului  Cantului
Cu nimic altceva pe limba, decît Hallelujah

 Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia, Aleluia
Aleluia

Cuvantul talmacitorului: Tot ce facem in viata e “aleluia” tot ce gandim e “aleluia”, tot ce gasim e “aleluia’ si tot ce lasam in urma e totul “aleluia”.