Tag Archives: debussy

historic musical bits: Paul Tortelier “Cello Sonata in D minor” by Debussy (1959)


Paul Tortelier “Cello Sonata D minor” Debussy

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Debussy: Valse romantique (1890)


Debussy: Valse romantique (1890)


Uploaded on May 2, 2009

Claude Debussy
(1862 – 1918)

Complete music for piano solo (in chronological order)

Valse romantique (1890)

  • Music

    • “Valse romantique” by Thiollier, Francois-Joel

Historic Musical Bits: Michelangeli Debussy Preludes Book 1


Michelangeli Debussy Preludes
Book 1

 

great compositions/performances: Maurice Ravel – Sonatine pour piano: Gabriele Tomasello, piano.


Maurice Ravel – Sonatine pour piano

Best Classical Music:, “Debussy: La Mer – 2. Play of the Waves (Jeux de vagues)” by London Symphony Orchestra, make music part of your life series


Debussy – La Mer

Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez


Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez

Historic Musical Bits: Mischa Maisky & Martha Argerich – Debussy: Cello Sonata , great compositions/performances


Mischa Maisky & Martha Argerich – Debussy: Cello Sonata

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Cello Sonata is a late work by the French composer Claude Debussy. It was the first of a planned series of ‘Six sonates pour divers instruments’, however Debussy only completed two others, the sonata for violin and the sonata for flute, viola and harp. The sonata for cello and piano was written in 1915, and is notable for its brevity, most performances not exceeding 11 minutes. It is a staple of the modern cello repertoire and is commonly regarded as one of the finest masterpieces written for the instrument.[1]

It is divided into three short movements:

  • I. Prologue: Lent, sostenuto e molto risoluto
  • II. Sérénade: Modérément animé
  • III. Finale: Animé, léger et nerveux

The two final movements are joined by an attacca. Instead of sonata form, Debussy structures the piece in the style of the eighteenth-century monothematic sonata, and was particularly influenced by the music of François Couperin.

The piece makes use of modes and whole-tone and pentatonic scales, as is typical of Debussy’s style. It also utilises many types of extended cello technique, including left-hand pizzicato, spiccato and flautando bowing, false harmonics and portamenti. Not surprisingly, the piece is considered technically demanding.

Whether descriptive comments related to characters of the Commedia dell’arte were actually given by Debussy to cellist Louis Rosoor remains unclear

 

Claude Debussy – Suite bergamasque


Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez, great compositions/performances


Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez

Leopold Stokowski “La Cathédrale engloutie” Debussy (1968): great compositions/performances


Claude Debussy : Clair de Lune, for Piano (Suite Bergamasque No. 3), L. 75/3: make music part of your life series


Claude Debussy : Clair de Lune, for Piano (Suite Bergamasque No. 3), L. 75/3 Performed by Kun Woo Paik

Claude Debussy – Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp: make music part of your life series


Classical Music  Classical Music
Doriot Anthony Dwyer, flute.

Burton Fine, viola.
Ann Hobson, harp.

– Pastorale. Lento, dolce rubato.
– Interlude: Tempo di Minuetto.
– Finale. Allegro moderato ma risoluto.

Syrinx, for Flute solo. Doriot Anthony Dwyer, flute.

The Sonata for flute, viola and harp (French: Sonate pour flûte, alto, et harpe), L. 137, was written by Claude Debussy in 1915.
The first performance was a private one at the home of Jacques Durand, Debussy’s publisher, on December 10, 1916 and the first public performance was thought to be at a charity concert on March 9, 1917 (Walker, 1988). However, Thompson (1968) reported a performance of the sonata at London’s Aeolian Hall by Albert Fransella, H. Waldo Warner and Miriam Timothy on February 2, 1917 as part of a concert otherwise given by the London String Quartet.
According to Léon Vallas (1929, cited in Walker, 1988), Debussy initially planned this as a piece for flute, oboe and harp. He subsequently decided that the viola’s timbre would be a better combination for the flute than the oboe’s, so he changed the instrumentation to flute, viola and harp

Claude Debussy Estampes Pianista Andrea Bambace live Trento SocietàFilarmonica 1984 : make music part of your life series


Claude Debussy Estampes Pianista Andrea Bambace live Trento SocietàFilarmonica 1984

Claude Debussy – Printemps (Suite symphonique): great compositions/performances


Claude Debussy – Printemps (Suite symphonique)

Orquestra Sinfônica de Minas Gerais – (OSMG)
Regência: Charles Roussin

Claude Debussy: L’Isle joyeuse L 106 (make music part of your life series)


[youtube.com/watch?v=Mva_kqhZ2zU]

Claude Debussy: L’Isle joyeuse

L 106

Created with http://www.mp32tube.comL’isle joyeuse, L. 106 (The Island of Pleasure) is an extended solo piano piece by Claude Debussy composed in 1904. According to Jim Samson (1977), the central relationship in the work is that between material based on the whole-tone scale, the lydian mode

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez


[youtube.com/watch?v=nZkgyIdXt44]

Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez

Debussy,
Printemps: Suite Symphonique
1. Tres Modere
2. Modere
Pierre Boulez

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Claudio Arrau plays Debussy Estampes, no.2, “La soirée dans Grenade”


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaEstampes (Prints), L.100, is a composition for solo piano by Claude Debussy. It was finished in 1903.

Estampes contains three movements:

  1. Pagodes (Pagodas) – approx. 6 minutes.
  2. La soirée dans Grenade (The Evening in Granada) – approx. 5½ minutes.
  3. Jardins sous la pluie (Gardens in the Rain) – approx. 3½ minutes.[1]

II. La soirée dans Grenade

La soirée dans Grenade uses the Arabic scale and mimics guitar strumming to evoke images of GranadaSpain. At the time of its writing, Debussy’s only personal experience with the country was a few hours spent in San Sebastián.[2] Despite this, the Spanish composer Manuel de Falla said of Soirée, “There is not even one measure of this music borrowed from the Spanish folklore, and yet the entire composition in its most minute details, conveys admirably Spain“.[3]

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Great compositions/Performances: Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez


Claude Debussy

Printemps, symphonic suite for chorus, piano & orchestra, L. 61

1. Tres Modere

Claude Debussy LOC 23688
2. Modere 
Pierre Boulez

From AllMusic

One of Debussy‘s assignments as a Prix de Rome scholar at the Villa Medici in 1887 was to send back to the Fine Arts Academy in France an orchestral score so his benefactors could judge his professional progress. All Debussy managed to turn in was a piano duet called Printemps, or “Spring”; he claimed that the full score, complete with humming chorus, had been destroyed in a fire. Not until 1913 did he get around to generating an orchestral version, and even then the work was assigned to Henri Büsser who, working from the keyboard original, had no access to any original choral material. In a nod to the music’s origins, Büsser included a prominent but not quite concertante keyboard part in the finished score.

The Academy committee found the piece to be excessively progressive, which in the late 1880s meant little more than Wagnerian in its chromaticism. (The committee’s condemnation includes the first recorded application of the term “Impressionism” to Debussy‘s music.) Only in the orchestration did the music begin to sound like mature, Impressionistic Debussy, that effect achieved through timbre rather than harmony. The composer said he intended to compose a work “of a particular color, covering as wide a range of sensations as possible.” Actually, in terms of sensations, Printemps is limited to two: yearning, giving way to relaxed happiness. Debussydescribed the music’s program as “the slow, laborious birth of beings and things in nature, and then their blossoming outward and upward, and finally a burst of joy at being reborn to new life.” Consequently, the piece falls into two movements, both at moderate tempo, and neither employ particularly straightforward or memorable melodic material; the emphasis is entirely on mood.

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Great compositions/Interpretations:Debussy – Six Epigraphes Antiques – Piano Duet: Valeria Szervánszky & Ronald Cavaye


[youtube.com/watch?v=vwwU_3T8S60]

Great compositions/Interpretations:Debussy – Six Epigraphes Antiques – Piano Duet: Valeria Szervánszky & Ronald Cavaye
Painting by Jenö Szervánszky

Antique Epigraphs is a ballet made on New York City Ballet by balletmaster Jerome Robbins to an orchestrated version of Debussy’s Six épigraphes antiques, L131, for piano, four hands, from 1914:…..

  • “Pour invoquer Pan, dieu du vent d’été”
  • “Pour un tombeau sans nom”
  • “Pour que la nuit soit propice”
  • “Pour la danseuse aux crotales”
  • “Pour l’égyptienne”
  • “Pour remercier la pluie au matin”

…..and his Syrinx, L129, a melody for unaccompanied flute from 1913. Six épigraphes antiques were originally written to accompany Pierre Louys‘ Chanson de Bilitis, prose poetry which was purported to be a translation of freshly discovered autobiographical verse by Sappho (it was not).[1][2] The premiere took place on February 2, 1984, at the New York State TheaterLincoln Center, with costumes by Florence Klotz and lighting by Jennifer Tipton.

 

 

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Claude Debussy (1862-1918): “La plus que lente” ( part of Henry and June Playlist WOW….What enchanting music one and all!)



The composer Claude Debussy needs little introduction. As a pianist, he was noted for his avoidance of the crisp, dry and articulated style which typified French pianism of the nineteenth century. His style of playing was simple, highly tone-conscious and completely uncluttered by over-expressive angst.

The recording is a piano roll recording made by Debussy for Welte in 1913 (just three years after the work was composed). The piano rolls for Welte are amongst the most accurate we have, conveying the original performed dynamics, attack and pedalling rather faithfully, and when a good roll is played on a properly conditioned piano, the problems of dubious rhythmic bumpiness which infect many roll playbacks can vanish. This rendition seems as fine as we could hope for.

This work, “La plus que lente“, is a very slow waltz of sorts, composed in 1910.

 

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Debussy: Suite bergamasque – 3. Clair de lune (1890-1905)



Claude Debussy 
(1862 – 1918) 
Complete music for piano solo (in chronological order) 
Suite bergamasque – 3. Clair de lune (1890-1905)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

An excerpt from “Clair de lune,” the third movement of the Suite bergamasque.

The Suite bergamasque (French pronunciation: ​[bɛʁɡamask]) is one of the most famous pianosuites by Claude Debussy. Debussy commenced the suite in 1890 at age 28, but he did not finish or publish it until 1905.[1]

The Suite bergamasque was first composed by Debussy around 1890, but was significantly revised just before its publication in 1905. It seems that by the time a publisher came to Debussy in order to cash in on his fame and have these pieces published, Debussy loathed the earlier piano style in which these pieces were written.[1] While it is not known how much of the Suite was written in 1890 and how much was written in 1905, it is clear that Debussy changed the names of at least two of the pieces. “Passepied” was called “Pavane”, and “Clair de lune” was originally titled “Promenade Sentimentale.” These names also come fromPaul Verlaine‘s poems.[1]

Movements

The Suite bergamasque consists of four movements:

  1. “Prélude”
  2. “Menuet”
  3. “Clair de lune”
  4. “Passepied”

The suite has been orchestrated by many composers, including André CapletLeopold Stokowski, and Lucien CaillietDimitri Tiomkin arranged “Clair de lune” for organ for his musical score for Warner Brothers’ 1956 film Giant.

 

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Great Performances: Claude Debussy, Sarabande pour le Piano, L95. Claudio Arrau, piano. — Lista de reproducción Claude Debussy: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…


Claude Debussy
Sarabande pour le Piano, L95. 
Claudio Arrau, piano.

Lista de reproducción Claude Debussy:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

  • Claudio Arrau
    Pianist
  • Claudio Arrau León was a Chilean pianist known for his interpretations of a vast repertoire spanning from the baroque to 20th-century composers, especially Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Liszt and Brahms. Wikipedia
 

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Unforgettable Compositions: Claude Debussy : Claude Debussy: Children’s Corner Suite L 113 with André Caplet 1911


Claude Debussy : Children’s Corner Suite – orch. André Caplet 1911
Orchestre National de l’O.R.T.F., Jean Martinon, 1974
oboe: Jules Goetgheluk

1. Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum
2. Jimbo’s Lullaby
3. Serenade for the Doll
4. The Snow is Dancing
5. The Little Shepherd
6. Golliwogg’s Cakewalk

Achille-Claude Debussy (aʃil klod dəbysi) (22 August 1862- 25 March 1918)

Children’s Corner (L.113) is a six-movement suite for solo piano by Claude Debussy. It was published by Durand in 1908, and was given its world première in Paris by Harold Bauer on December 18 of that year. In 1911, an orchestration of the work by Debussy’s friend André Caplet received its première and was subsequently published.

more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children…
http://youtu.be/OTuZMQt6w5c

Max Bruch

Max Bruch

Max Christian Friedrich Bruch (6 January 1838 – 2 October 1920), also known as Max Karl August Bruch,[1] was a German Romanticcomposer and conductor who wrote over 200 works, including three violin concertos, the first of which has become a staple of the violin repertory.

Life

Bruch was born in CologneRhine Province, where he received his early musical training under the composer and pianist Ferdinand Hiller, to whom Robert Schumann dedicated his piano concerto in A minor. Bohemian composer and piano virtuoso Ignaz Moscheles recognized his aptitude.

At the age of nine he wrote his first composition, a song for his mother’s birthday. From then on music was his passion, his studies enthusiastically supported by his parents. Many small early creative works included motets, psalm settings, piano pieces, violin sonatas, a string quartet and even orchestral works like the prelude to a planned opera “Joan of Arc”. Few of these early works have survived, however.

The first music theory lesson was in 1849 in Bonn by Professor Heinrich Carl Breidenstein, a friend of his father. At this time he stayed at estate in Bergisch Gladbach, where he wrote much of his music. The farm belonged to the lawyer and notary Neissen, who lived in it with his unmarried sister. Later the estate was bought by the Zanders family who owned a large paper mill. The young Bruch was taught by his father in French and English conversation. In later years, Mary Zanders became a friend and patron.

Bruch had a long career as a teacher, conductor and composer, moving among musical posts in Germany:Mannheim (1862–1864), Koblenz (1865–1867), Sondershausen, (1867–1870), Berlin (1870–1872), and Bonn, where he spent 1873–78 working privately. At the height of his career he spent three seasons as conductor of the Liverpool Philharmonic Society (1880–83). There he met his wife, Clara Tuczek. He taught composition at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik from 1890 until his retirement in 1910. Bruch died in his house in Berlin-Friedenau in 1920.

Claude Debussy – Children’s Corner



Children’s Corner is a suite for solo piano by Claude Debussy dedicated to his daughter, Claude-Emma (known as “Chou-Chou”), who was three years old at the time. It was published in 1908, and was given its world première in Paris by Harold Bauer on December 18 of that year. There are six pieces in the suite, each with an English-language title. This choice of language is most likely Debussy’s nod towards Chou-Chou’s English governess. The pieces are:

Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum (0:00)
– Jimbo’s Lullaby (2:09)
– Serenade for the Doll (5:47)
– The Snow is Dancing (8:28)
– The Little Shepherd (11:05)
– Golliwogg’s Cakewalk (13:50)

Pianist: Benjamin Moser
Picture: Children at the Beach at Guernsey, Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

 

Debussy – Printemps, avec le choeur initialement prévu (1887)



En n’envoyant à l’Académie des Beaux-Arts, en 1887, qu’une partition pour piano à quatre mains et choeur de Printemps (suite symphonique en deux mouvements), son deuxième “envoi de Rome“, Debussy prétendit que la partition d’orchestre avait été détruite dans un incendie. Il semble plutôt qu’elle n’ait jamais existé. Et ce n’est qu’en 1912 que l’oeuvre fut orchestrée, mais par Henri Busser, qui fit abstraction du choeur. Ce qui incita beaucoup plus tard le chef d’orchestre américain Emil de Cou à réorchestrer Printemps en réintroduisant le choeur (sans paroles) prévu à l’origine. C’est cette version qu’on peut entendre ici, les interprètes étant The San Francisco Ballet Orchestra et The San Francisco Ballet Chorus, sous la direction d’Emil de Cou. 

– I. (00:00) Très modéré;
– II. (11:58) Modéré.

Dominik Połoński – Claude Debussy, Cello Sonata d-minor L. 135 1. Prologue


ARRAU PLAYS DEBUSSY POUR LE PIANO 1 OF 2


ARRAU PLAYS DEBUSSY POUR LE PIANO 1 OF 2

Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez



Debussy,
Printemps: Suite Symphonique
1. Tres Modere
2. Modere 
Pierre Boulez

Debussy: Masques (1904)



Piano:   Francois-Joel Thiollier

Debussy, Suite Bergamasque. Claudio Arrau, piano



Claude-Achille Debussy (1862 – 1918)
Suite Bergamasque
1. Prélude
2. Minuet
3. Clair de lune
4. Passepied
Claudio Arrau, piano.

La Suite Bergamasque de Claude Debussy es una suite para piano en varios movimientos. Aunque fue escrita en 1890, la obra no se publicó hasta 1905, y eso pese a que su autor intentó que no viese la luz, pues creía que esta obra de juventud estaba muy por debajo del nivel de sus composiciones más modernas.
La Suite toma su nombre de las máscaras de la Commedia dell’Arte de Bérgamo (Comedia del arte de Bérgamo) y está inspirada en las Fêtes galantes (Fiestas galantes) de Verlaine.

Pinturas de Vincent van Gogh.

 

Leopold Stokowski “La Cathédrale engloutie” Debussy


Published on Aug 29, 2012

“La Cathédrale engloutie” The sunken Cathedral”
for piano by Claude Debussy,
arranged for orchestra by Leopold Stokowski
New Philharmonic Orchestra
Leopold Stokowski, conductor
1968

Debussy playlist – “La Mer”: “Dialogue between Wind and Wave”



Third movement of Debussy‘s “La Mer” (“The Sea”): “Dialogue du vent et de la mer” (“Dialogue between Wind and Waves”).

By listening to this wondrous piece, you can choose to allow the entire playlist run it’s course: great thing about our time: we can do that…well, so far, at least!

 

Today’s Birthday: Anton Bruckner (1824) – let’s listen to some Anton Bruckner’s music this evening!


Anton Bruckner (1824)

Bruckner was an Austrian composer who established a reputation as a virtuoso organist in Vienna. However, as a composer, he gained recognition slowly. He was 60 before he achieved fame with his 1884 Symphony No. 7 in E Major, one of nine that he completed. Socially awkward and eccentric, he developed a pattern of courting much younger women without success. Bruckner once accidentally alienated an influential critic after getting mixed up in a feud between what two famous composers? More… Discuss