Tag Archives: dinu lipatti

historic musical bits, Liszt – Sonetto 104 del Petrarca – pianista Dinu Lipatti, great compositions/performances


Liszt – Sonetto 104 del Petrarca – pianista Dinu Lipatti

JOHANNES BRAHMS – 7 WALTZES OP. 39: JOHANNES BRAHMS – 7 WALTZES OP. 39 Performed by Dinu Lipatti, Nadia Boulanger



JOHANNES BRAHMS – 7 WALTZES OP. 39
Performed by Dinu Lipatti, Nadia Boulanger

1. Waltz for Four Hands in C-Sharp Major, No. 6, Op. 39 00:00
2. Waltz for Four Hands in A-Flat Major, No. 15, Op. 39 00:58
3. Waltz for Four Hands in E Major, No. 2, Op. 39 2:04
4. Waltz for Four Hands in B Major, No. 1, Op. 39 3:19
5. Waltz for Four Hands in G-Sharp Minor, No. 14, Op. 39 4:07
6. Waltz for Four Hands in G Major, No. 10, Op. 39 5:15
7. Waltz for Four Hands in E Major, No. 5, Op. 39 5:47

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26


[youtube.com/watch?v=qdGh5UqbbuA]

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: 
Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26 (1898)

[1] Allegro molto moderato
[2] Allegretto scherzando 14:30
[3] Molto andante 22:09
[4] Presto 34:16

Andrei Csaba (cello)
Dan Grigore (piano)

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Lipatti & Ansermet – Schumann Concerto in A minor Op. 54



1. Allegro affettuoso
2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (15:32)
3. Allegro vivace (20:26)

Dinu Lipatti, piano
Ernest Ansermet conducting the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
live – Geneva, February 22, 1950

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: DINU LIPATTI (1917)


Dinu Lipatti (1917)

Lipatti was a Romanian pianist whose career was tragically cut short by Hodgkin’s lymphoma at age 33. Despite a relatively short playing career and a small recorded legacy, Lipatti is considered among the finest pianists of the 20th century. He was much admired for his pianistic technique, and he is noted for his interpretations of Mozart, Bach, and Chopin. As a teen, Lipatti came in second in the Vienna International Piano Competition. How did his failure to take first place impact his future? More… Discuss

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Dinu Lipatti – Chopin Nocturne Op. 27, No.2 in D flat Major



Dinu Lipatti – Chopin Nocturne No2 op 27 in D flat Major
More information about Dinu Lipatti (and Clara Haskil, another great piano player) you can find on http://www.lipatti-haskil-foundation….

 

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Make music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467 (Elvira Madigan) Pollini/Muti



Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467

Orchestra Filarmonica della Scala
Maurizio Pollini, piano
Riccardo Muti, conductor
(2004)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto No. 21 in C majorK. 467, was completed on March 9, 1785 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, four weeks after the completion of the previous D minor concerto, K. 466.[1][2]

The concerto has three movements:

 

  1. Allegro maestoso; in common time. The tempo marking is in Mozart’s catalog of his own works, but not in the autograph manuscript.[3]
  2. Andante in F major. In both the autograph score and in his personal catalog, Mozart notated the meter as Alla breve[4]
  3. Allegro vivace assai

Recordings:  This work has been recorded numerous times by many famous pianists including Géza AndaPiotr Anderszewski,Vladimir AshkenazyDaniel BarenboimMalcolm BilsonAlfred BrendelRobert CasadesusIvan DrenikovAnnie FischerWalter GiesekingFriedrich GuldaStephen HoughKeith JarrettWilhelm KempffWalter KlienAlicia de LarrochaGiorgi LatsabidzeRosina LhevinneDinu LipattiRadu LupuMurray PerahiaMaria João Pires,Maurizio PolliniArthur RubinsteinFazil SayAndrás SchiffArtur SchnabelRudolf SerkinHoward Shelley,Mitsuko Uchida, and Christian Zacharias.

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Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring


[youtube.com/watch?v=3jGbQfIXh44&feature=c4-overview&list=UU6sujip0vq_jTW69yQkKS2w]

Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring is the most common English title of the 10th and last movement of the cantata Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben, BWV 147 (“Heart and Mouth and Deed and Life”), composed by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1716 and 1723. Written during his first year in Leipzig, Germany, this chorale movement is one of Bach’s most enduring works.

Jesu, joy of man’s desiring,

Holy wisdom, love most bright;

Drawn by Thee, our souls aspiring

Soar to uncreated light.

Word of God, our flesh that fashioned,

With the fire of life impassioned,

Striving still to truth unknown,

Soaring, dying round Thy throne.

Through the way where hope is guiding,

Hark, what peaceful music rings;

Where the flock, in Thee confiding,

Drink of joy from deathless springs.

Theirs is beauty’s fairest pleasure;

Theirs is wisdom’s holiest treasure.

Thou dost ever lead Thine own

In the love of joys unknown.

Enjoy, It’s all good!

 

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Dinu Lipatti plays Bach Partita No.1 BWV 825 at his last recital (Part and Playlist)



Dinu Lipatti performing the first half of the Bach Partita No.1 in B-Flat, BWV 825 at his last public performance, at the Besancon International Music Festival on September 16, 1950.

Dinu Lipatti (1917-1950)- Chopin Valse Op. 69 n. 1 in A flat major (n. 9 Adieux)


English: Romanian pianist Dinu Lipatti (1917-1...

Image via Wikipedia

Studio recording of 1950

Excepts from Wikipedia: Dinu Lipatti (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈdinu liˈpati]; 1 April [O.S. 19 March] 1917 – 2 December 1950) was a Romanian classical pianist and composerwhose career was cut short by his death from Hodgkin’s disease at age 33. He was elected posthumously to the Romanian Academy.

Lipatti was born in Bucharest into a musical family: his father was a violinist who had studied with Pablo de Sarasate and Carl Flesch,[1] his mother a pianist. For his baptism, which occurred not shortly after birth as is usual, but when he was old enough to play the piano, the violinist and composerGeorge Enescu agreed to be his godfather. Lipatti played a minuet by Mozart at his own baptism.[1] He studied at the Gheorghe Lazăr High School, while undergoing piano and composition studies with Mihail Jora for three years. He then attended the Bucharest Conservatoire, studying under Florica Musicescu, who also taught him privately.[1] In June 1930, the best pupils at the Conservatoire gave a concert at the Bucharest Opera, and the 13-year old Lipatti received a huge ovation for his performance of the Grieg Piano Concerto in A minor.[1] In 1932 he won prizes for his compositions: a Piano Sonatina, and a Sonatina for Violin and Piano. That year he also won a Grand Prize for his symphonic suite Les Tziganes.[1]

He entered the 1933 Vienna International Piano Competition but finished second, because the jury considered him too young. Alfred Cortot, who thought Lipatti should have won, resigned from the jury in protest.[2] Lipatti subsequently studied in Paris under Cortot, Nadia Boulanger (with whom he recorded some of Brahms‘s Waltzes Op. 39), Paul Dukas (composition) and Charles Munch (conducting). He gave his first concert, at the École Normale, on 20 May 1935. However, three days before the concert, Paul Dukas died; in memory of Dukas, Lipatti’s first piece at his concert, and the piece he first publicly performed as an adult pianist, was J. S. Bach‘s Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring.[1]

Lipatti’s career was interrupted by World War II. Although he continued to give concerts throughout Europe, including Nazi-occupied territories, he eventually fled his native Romania in 1943 and settled with his wife (Madeleine Cantacuzene, also a concert pianist) in GenevaSwitzerland, where he accepted the position as piano professor at the conservatory. It was at this time that the first signs of his illness emerged. At first, doctors were baffled, but in 1947 he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s disease.[3] As a result, his public performances became considerably less frequent after the war.

Lipatti gave his final recital, which was recorded, on 16 September 1950 in BesançonFrance. Despite severe illness, he gave unmatched performances of Bach‘s Partita in B flat major, Mozart‘s A minor Sonata, Schubert‘s G flat major and E flat major Impromptus, and thirteen ofChopin‘s Waltzes. He excluded No. 2, which he was too exhausted to play; he offered instead Myra Hess‘s transcription of Bach’s Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring, the piece with which he had started his professional career as a pianist in 1935. He died less than 3 months later, in Geneva. Lipatti is buried at the cemetery of Chêne-Bourg next to his wife Madeleine, a noted piano teacher. (from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinu_Lipatti)