Tag Archives: Dmitri Shostakovich

today’s birthday: Federico García Lorca (1898)


Federico García Lorca (1898)

García Lorca was a Spanish poet, dramatist, and member of the Generation of ’27, an influential group of poets that arose in Spanish literary circles in the 1920s. His most famous works include the book Gypsy Ballads and his poem, “Lament for the Death of a Bullfighter.” The poetry, passion, and violence of his works, which combine Spanish folklore with his personal experience, and his own tragic and bloody death brought him enduring international acclaim. How did he die? More… Discuss

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Historic Musical Bits: Shostakovich Plays Shostakovich – Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102 , great compositions/performances


Shostakovich Plays Shostakovich – Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major,
Op. 102

Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan: great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan

Movements:

1. Adagio, 4/8 — Allegro molto, 2/4, E minor
2. Largo, common time, D-flat major, then later C-sharp minor
3. Scherzo: Molto vivace — Poco sostenuto, 3/4, E minor
4. Allegro con fuoco, common time, E minor, ends in E major
Sinfonia n.º 9 (Dvořák)
A Sinfonia Nº. 9 em Mi menor Op. 95 Sinfonia do Novo Mundo
Symfonie č. 9 (Dvořák), Symfonie č.9, e-moll, op. 95 Antonína Dvořáka

Instrumentation
This symphony is scored for an orchestra of the following:
2 flutes (one doubling piccolo)
2 oboes (one doubling on English horn)
2 clarinets in A and B♭ (B♭ in movement 2)
2 bassoons
4 horns in E, C and F
2 trumpets in E, C and E♭
2 tenor trombones
bass trombone
tuba (second movement only)
timpani
triangle (third movement only)
cymbals (fourth movement only)
strings
Symphony No. 9 (Dvořák)

Jonathan Carney “Romance” The Gadfly, for Irene: great compositions/performances


Jonathan Carney “Romance” The Gadfly, for Irene

Dmitri Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No.2 in F major – D. Shostakovich, A. Cluytens: make music part of your life series


Dmitri Shostakovich: Piano Concerto No.2 in F major – D. Shostakovich, A. Cluytens

today’s birthday: Dmitri Shostakovich (1906)


Dmitri Shostakovich (1906)

Although Shostakovich is regarded as the greatest Russian composer after Igor Stravinsky, he was denounced multiple times by the authorities and had his work banned during his lifetime. The first denunciation—of his opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, in which he experimented with avant-garde trends—made a strong impression on him and led him to adopt a very different style that was serious and elegiac, with a directness aimed at the public. What brought him back into Stalin’s good graces? More… Discuss

Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975) : The Gadfly, suite (1955): make music part of your life series


Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975) : The Gadfly, suite (1955) – Homage to great Youtubers : imusiciki

 

Shostakovich: Ballet Suite No. 4: make music par of your life series


Shostakovich: Ballet Suite No. 4

The Queer Urban Orchestra, under the direction of Nolan Dresden, performs Dmitri Shostakovich’s Ballet Suite No. 4 at our Mysterium concert, March 20, 2011. The work is in three movements:
I – Introduction and Variations;
II – Waitz; and
III – Scherzo.

great compositions/performances: Leonid Kogan plays Lalo Symphonie Espagnole op.21, Kirill Kondrashin USSR 1959 – LIVE


[youtube.com/watch?v=XRe9rlZ2Mio]

Leonid Kogan plays Lalo Symphonie Espagnole op.21, Kirill Kondrashin USSR 1959 LIVE

Leonid Kogan (1924-1982), the great Russian violinist.

Édouard-Victoire-Antoine Lalo (1823- 1892) was a French composer.

Symphonie Espagnole, op.21
I. Allergo non troppo (0:00)
II. Scherzando – Allegro molto (7:27)
III. Intermezzo – Allegro non troppo (11:36)
IV. Andante (17:21)
V. Rondo – Allegro(23:41)

Kirill Kondrashin
The USSR State Symphony Ochestra
Recorded in 1959. 10. 21
Live at the Moscow Conservatory Grand Hall

*****

There are three Kogan’s Lalo Symphonie Espagnole recordings I know by now :

with Charles Bruck
Paris Conservatory Orchestra
1950s

with Kirill Kondrashin
Philhamonia Orchestra
London, Abbey Road Studio
1959. 2. 25-27

with Kirill Konrashin
USSR State Symphony Orchestra
Live at Moscow Conservatory Grand Hall
1959. 10. 21

 

 

Dmitry Shostakovich, Festive Overture, Op. 96 (arr. for wind ensemble)



Dmitry Shostakovich
President’s Own United States Marine Band, The, President’s Own United States Marine Band, The
Festive Overture, Op. 96 (arr. for wind ensemble)
President’s Own United States Marine Band: The Bicentennial Collection
75442261012
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalog…
http://www.naxoslicensing.com/

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Shostakovich: Ballet Suite No. 4


[youtube.com/watch?v=auH0YLmP5-E]
The Queer Urban Orchestra, under the direction of Nolan Dresden, performs Dmitri Shostakovich’s Ballet Suite No. 4 at our Mysterium concert, March 20, 2011. The work is in three movements: I – Introduction and Variations; II – Waitz; and III – Scherzo.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonín Dvořák – Czech Suite in D major, B. 93, Op. 39 – II. Polka



Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (Katowice), Antoni Wit. Paint, A Village In Winter by Adrianus Eversen

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857)



Johannes Brahms

Work: Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857) for orchestra

Mov.I: Allegro molto 00:00
Mov.II: Scherzo: Allegro non troppo 10:27
Mov.III: Adagio non troppo 17:55
Mov.IV: Menuetto I & II 33:35
Mov.V: Scherzo: Allegro 37:13
Mov.VI: Rondo: Allegro 39:47

Orchestra: Capella Agustina

Conductor: Andreas Spering

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 3 in D major, Op. 29 (Fedoseyev)



Pyotr Ilyich TchaikovskySymphony No. 3 [“Polish”] in D major, Op. 29 (1875)
1. Introduzione e Allegro
2. Alla tedesca. Allegro moderato e semplice
3. Andante elegiaco
4. Scherzo. Allegro vivo
5. Finale. Allegro con fuoco

Moskow Radio Symphony Orchestra
Conductor – Vladimir Fedoseyev
Recorded live at the Alte Oper Frankfurt, 1991

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Shostakovich – Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 [Kirill Kondrashin, USSR State SO, 1951]



Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 (1923-25)

I. Allegretto – Allegro non troppo [0:00]
II. Allegro (Scherzo) [9:16]
III. Lento – [13:43]
IV. Allegro molto [23:29]

The first symphony by Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975), which he dedicated to his friend Mikhail Kvadri. Shostakovich completed the work at age 19 as his graduation assignment for the Petrograd (formerly St. Petersburg, later Leningrad) Conservatory, which was directed at the time by Alexander Glazunov. Shostakovich’s main composition teacher Maximilian Steinberg oversaw the project. The composer initially wished to use his Scherzo, Op. 7 (1923-24) as the second movement of the symphony, but Steinberg was appalled by its grotesque character and suggested that Shostakovich compose a different movement. He followed his teacher’s advice in composing a new movement, but it was ever more steeped in grotesquerie than the earlier scherzo, and the same brash, brittle character pervades much of the symphony; as Shostakovich wrote to his friend Lev Oborin, “It would be more fitting to call this work the ‘Symphony-Grotesque’.” Although the symphony is vintage Shostakovich, it also bears the influence of earlier Russian masters – from the piquant harmonies of Stravinsky’s Petrushka and the sharp wit of the young Prokofiev to the lush colours and chromaticism of Scriabin and the long-drawn lyricism of Tchaikovsky.

The symphony’s premiere on May 12, 1926 in the Great Hall of the Leningrad Philharmonic (conducted by Nikolai Malko) was a resounding success. Shostakovich’s mother recalled the performance: “All went more than brilliantly – a splendid orchestra and magnificent execution … At the end, Mitya was called to the stage over and over again. When our handsome young composer appeared, looking almost like a little boy, the enthusiasm turned into one long thunderous ovation.”

This recording dates from 1951. The conductor Kirill Kondrashin leads the USSR State Symphony Orchestra.

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Dmitri Shostakovich – The second waltz


Make Music Part of Your Life Series:
*****Dmitri Shostakovich – The second waltz*****

Tombstone of Shostakovich, showing his D-E♭-C-...

Tombstone of Shostakovich, showing his D-E♭-C-B motif. Novodevichy Cemetery, Moscow. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)


Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world.

Compositions name list:

00:01 – Albinoni – Adagio in g minor
10:44 – Pachelbel – Canon in D major
16:55 – Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata
22:59 – Carlos GardelPor una cabeza
30:03 – Dmitri Shostakovich – Waltz no 2
33:52 – Eugen Doga – Grammofon
36:20 – Gheorghe Zamfir – The Lonely Shepherd
40:40 – Johann Strauss IIVienna Blood Waltz
47:46 – Johann Strauss II – Voices of Spring Waltz
53:31 – Juventino Rosas – Over the Waves Waltz
59:20 – Mozart – Rondo Alla Turca
1:02:57 – Mozart – Symphony 40 No 1
1:09:16 – Mozart – Lacrimosa
1:12:36 – Nino Rota – Vito’s Waltz
1:15:28 – Nobuo Uematsu – Dance With the Balamb-Fish
1:19:08 – Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty Waltz
1:23:47 – Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake Waltz
1:30:41 – Tchaikovsky – Waltz of the Flowers
1:37:05 – Mozart – Serenade No 13

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Shostakovich Plays Shostakovich – Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102



Dmitri Shostakovich
Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102

Dmitri Shostakovich, piano movements:

  1. Allegtro (A jolly main theme)
  2. Andante (The second movement is subdued and romantic)
  3. Allegro (The finale is a lively dance in duple time)

Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Française
André Cluytens, conductor

From Wikipedia

Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102, by Dmitri Shostakovich was composed in 1957 for his son Maxim’s 19th birthday. Maxim premiered the piece during his graduation at the Moscow Conservatory. It is an uncharacteristically cheerful piece, much more so than most of Shostakovich’s works.
The work is scored for solo piano, three flutes (third doubling piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four hornstimpanisnare drum andstrings.

 

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Great Performances: David Oistrakh – Mozart – Violin Sonata No 32 in B flat major, K 454



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Violin Sonata No 32 in B flat major, K 454

1 Largo – Allegro
2 Andante
3 Allegretto

David Oistrakh, violin
Paul Badura-Skoda, piano

 

Shostakovich Plays Shostakovich – Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102



Dmitri Shostakovich
Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102

Dmitri Shostakovich, piano

Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Française
André Cluytens, conductor

 

Alexander Borodin – STRING QUARTET Nº 2 Notturno



Alexander Borodin
Quartet per a cordes nº 2
Notturno (andante)

Borodin Quartet
Rostislav Dubinsky i Yaroslav Alexandrov, violins
Dmitry Shebalin, viola
Valentin Berlinsky, cello

 

Barbieri Symphony Orchestra – Flashmob oficial LavapiesMusic



El arte sale a la calle.
Presentación informal de la Barbieri Symphony Orchestra en colaboración con Lisarco Danza, Okube y BeringolaTV., bajo la dirección de Óliver Díaz y José Carlos Plaza.
La obra interpretada es el Vals de la Jazz Suite nº2 de Dmitri Shostakovich.

Si quieres más visitanos en http://www.bsorchestra.com

@BarbieriSO

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Barbier…

Barbieri Symphony Orchestra

“La música clásica como nunca la habías imaginado”

 

Emil Gilels spielt Robert Schumann: Arabeske Op. 18



Ort: Moskauer Konservatorium 1977

 

Simply Breathtaking: Shostakovich Jazz Suite No.2


The Suite for Jazz Orchestra No. 2 is a Suite by Dmitri Shostakovich. It was written in 1938 for the newly-founded State Jazz Orchestra of Victor Knushevitsky, and was premiered on 28 November 1938 in Moscow (Moscow Radio) by the State Jazz Orchestra. The score was lost during World War II, but a piano score of the work was rediscovered in 1999 by Manashir Yakubov. Three movements of the suite were reconstructed and orchestrated by Gerard McBurney, and were premiered at a London Promenade Concert in 2000.

The Suite, in its reconstructed form, consists of the following movements:

  1. Scherzo
  2. Lullaby
  3. Serenade

Until recently, another eight-movement Suite by Shostakovich had been misidentified and recorded as the second Jazz Suite. This work is now correctly known as the Suite for Variety Orchestra (post-1956), from which the “Waltz No. 2” was made famous by the soundtrack to Stanley Kubrick‘s Eyes Wide Shut, and which now seems irrevocably erroneously associated with the Jazz Suite No. 2.[1][2

Heinrich Neuhaus plays Beethoven Sonata No. 24 Op. 78 in F sharp Major (“À Thérèse”)


I. Adagio cantabile – Allegro ma non troppo
II. Allegro vivace 
rec. 1950   (the best interpretation of ” À Thérèse”)

Heinrich Gustavovich Neuhaus (Russian: Генрих Густавович Нейгауз, Genrikh Gustavovič Nejgauz; 12 April [O.S. 31 March] 1888 — October 10, 1964) was a Soviet pianist and pedagogue of German extraction. He taught at the Moscow Conservatory from 1922 to 1964. He was made a People’s Artist of the RSFSR in 1956. His pedagogic book The Art of Piano Playing (1958) is regarded as one of the most authoritative and most widely used treatments on the subject.
He was born in Elisavetgrad (known since 1939 as Kirovohrad), Ukraine. Although both his parents were piano teachers, he was largely self-taught. The biggest influences on his early artistic development came from his cousin Karol Szymanowski (tutored by another relative, Gustav Neuhaus) and especially his uncle Felix Blumenfeld on his visits to his sisters’ home. He also received some lessons from Aleksander Michałowski. In 1902 he gave a recital in Elisavetgrad with the 11-year-old Mischa Elman and in 1904 gave concerts in Dortmund, Bonn, Cologne and Berlin. Subsequently he studied with Leopold Godowsky in Berlin and from 1909 until the outbreak of World War I at his master classes in Vienna Academy of Music.

In 1914 Neuhaus started teaching in Elisavetgrad and later Tbilisi (Tiflis) and Kiev (where he befriended Vladimir Horowitz). After having been temporarily paralyzed, Neuhaus was forced to halt his concert career in the interests of his pedagogical activities. In 1922 he began teaching at the Moscow Conservatory where he was also director between 1935 and 1937. When the Germans approached Moscow in 1942, he was imprisoned as a “German spy” but released eight months later under pressure from Dmitri Shostakovich, Emil Gilels and others. His pupils there included Yakov Zak, Sviatoslav Richter, Emil Gilels, Anatoly Vedernikov, Tikhon Khrennikov, Yevgeny Malinin, Lev Naumov, Tamara Guseva, Ryszard Bakst, Teodor Gutman, Vera Gornostayeva, Alexander Slobodyanik, Leonid Brumberg, Igor Zhukov, Oleg Boshniakovich, Anton Ginsburg, Valeri Kastelsky, Gérard Frémy, Zdeněk Hnát, Rudolf Kehrer, Eliso Virsaladze, Alexei Lubimov, Aleksey Nasedkin, Victor Eresko, Vladimir Krainev, Evgeny Mogilevsky and Radu Lupu.

He died in Moscow in 1964.

Neuhaus was renowned for the poetic magnetism of his playing and for his artistic refinement. He was a life-long friend of Boris Pasternak, and Osip Mandelshtam expressed his admiration for Neuhaus’s playing in a poem. Stanislav Neuhaus, Heinrich’s son by his first wife Zinaida (who married Pasternak in 1931), was also a noted pianist; Stanislav Bunin is his grandson.
(Wikipedia)

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Dmitri Shostakovich Festive Uverture Op 96


Shostakovich Festive Overture Op 96 Live At The  Nobel Prize Concert 2009:

Composer: Dmitri Shostakovich,

Conductor: Yuri Temirkanov,
Orchestra: Royal Stockholm Philharmonic.

Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich (September 1906 — 9 August 1975) was a Soviet Russian composer and one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century.

Shostakovich achieved fame in the Soviet Union under the patronage of Leon Trotsky‘s chief of staff Mikhail Tukhachevsky, but later had a complex and difficult relationship with the Stalinist bureaucracy. In 1936, the government, most probably under orders from Stalin, harshly criticized his opera Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District, causing him to withdraw the Fourth Symphony during its rehearsal stages. Shostakovich’s music was officially denounced twice, in 1936 and 1948, and was periodically banned. Nevertheless, he also received accolades and state awards and served in the Supreme Soviet of the RSFSR. Despite the official controversy, his works were popular and well received.

After a period influenced by Sergei Prokofiev and Igor Stravinsky, Shostakovich developed a hybrid style, as exemplified by Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District (1934). This single work juxtaposed a wide variety of trends, including the neo-classical style (showing the influence of Stravinsky) and post-Romanticism (after Gustav Mahler). Sharp contrasts and elements of the grotesque characterize much of his music.

Shostakovich’s orchestral works include 15 symphonies and six concerti. His symphonic work is typically complex and requires large scale orchestras. Music for chamber ensembles includes 15 string quartets, a piano quintet, two pieces for a string octet, and two piano trios. For the piano he composed two solo sonatas, an early set of preludes, and a later set of 24 preludes and fugues. Other works include two operas, and a substantial quantity of film music. Read more about His life and work at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dmitri_Shostakovich