Tag Archives: dna

Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


© Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert)

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UK May Be First to Allow “3-Parent Babies”


UK May Be First to Allow “3-Parent Babies”

The UK House of Commons voted Tuesday to allow a method of in vitro fertilization that uses DNA from three people. The House of Lords must approve the proposal before it becomes law. If it does, the UK would become the first country to allow the technique, which is intended to limit the transfer of mitochondrial disease from mother to child by combining a donor’s healthy mitochondrial DNA with nuclear DNA from the intended father and mother. The nuclear DNA of the donor egg would be removed in the process. Many ethical concerns about the process have been raised. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First Nobel Prizes Awarded (1901)


First Nobel Prizes Awarded (1901)

The Nobel Prizes, named after Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel, are awarded annually to those who have made outstanding contributions to the fields of physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, peace, and—since 1969—economic sciences. Nobel is said to have been inspired to create the prizes after reading his own prematurely published obituary, which condemned his invention of dynamite and referred to him as “the merchant of death.” What family has amassed the most Nobel Prizes? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Fritz Haber (1868)


Fritz Haber (1868)

Haber was a Nobel Prize-winning German chemist whose work was instrumental in the development of poison gas during World War I. He was unwavering in his support of chemical warfare and staunchly defended his work against critics, though he might have felt differently had he known how the Nazis would use the gas he helped develop against its own people—indeed Haber’s own relatives—just a few years later. His wife, on the other hand, was deeply opposed. In what way did she protest his work? More… Discuss

Author Claims Jack the Ripper Was Actually Aaron the Ripper


Author Claims Jack the Ripper Was Actually Aaron the Ripper

The true identity of the infamous serial killer known as Jack the Ripper has eluded investigators for over a century, but in his new book, Naming Jack the Ripper, author Russell Edwards claims to have solved the mystery at last. He points the finger at 23-year-old Polish immigrant and hairdresser Aaron Kosminski, long considered one of the key suspects in the so-called Whitechapel murders. Edwards arrived at this conclusion after linking DNA left on a shawl at one of the Ripper’s murder scenes to the descendants of Kosminski. More… Discuss

word: exonerate


exonerate 

Definition: (verb) Pronounce not guilty of criminal charges.
Synonyms: acquit, exculpate, discharge, clear
Usage: After the long trial, the suspect was exonerated of the murder charges, much to his relief. Discuss.

Gold as Cancer Fighter


Gold as Cancer Fighter

Alternative medicine proponents have long attributed healing properties to gold, and in recent years, mainstream medical researchers have begun looking to the precious metal as well. In a recent study, tiny gold particles encased in the chemotherapy drug cisplatin appeared to boost the effectiveness of conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment for an aggressive brain cancer. Cancer cells in samples subjected to this experimental treatment were completely eradicated, and over the next 20 days there was no regrowth. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Last Quagga Dies at Amsterdam’s Artis Magistra Zoo (1883)


Last Quagga Dies at Amsterdam’s Artis Magistra Zoo (1883)

Once found in great numbers on the plains of South Africa, the quagga was heavily hunted by Dutch settlers and became extinct in 1883. A century later, it was the first extinct animal to have its DNA studied. This research determined that the quagga was most likely a variant of the common zebra, contrasting the theory that it was a separate species. The quagga had a sandy brown coat but—like the zebra—had dark stripes on its head, neck, and shoulders. Where did the name “quagga” come from? More… Discuss

Why all the struggle? poetic thought by George-B (©Always) (the smudge and other poems)


Why all the struggle? poetic thought by George-B (©Always)

Do we really want change, 
do we really need it: 
when brought about by…
The king of darkness?
Can’t we do with things the way they are,
slowly dissolving into the ocean of time?
Just evolving into involution,
return to the wisdom of the cave dwellers,
Before fire was noticed by the clan chief?
Isn’t that satisfying enough?
Why all the struggle?

It’s alright, poetic thought by George-B (the smudge and other poems Page)


It’s alright, poetic thought by George-B (the smudge and other poems Page)

Before me, before I was,
There were two ideas of me, two thoughts
In two minds…and it was alright…
Then one day they came together in one,
New string of DNA, and it was all right…
I was then immersed in the ocean bubble, until
I grew wings, and it was alright…
One day, early morning, I thought
I could leave the ocean
for the rigors of land crawling,
but I did not crawl…
not for a while…and it was alright…
Then
Everything became prosaic, and prose,
and the poetry was lost to
the mundane passage of time,
and nothing could replace that anymore…
not ever…and it’s all right…

Credinta, poetic thought by George-B


Credinta, poetic thought by George-B

Credinta nu-i oarba:
Ea are un ochi ascuns, inautrul fiintei
de vede tot ce va sa fie…
E doar un suspin, fara alinare,
Sau poate un respir putin prea scurt,
ce parca cere mai mult,
un cascat, un pic de aer mai mult…

credinta nu-i oarba:
precum un magnet nevazut,
un instinct indrumator,
un memento in DNA, cine stie cat de batran…
credinta nu-i oarba.

http://obiectivortodox.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/manastirea-sambata-de-sus-12.jpg

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ARTICLE: FORENSICS


Forensics

Forensics is the science and practice of examining physical evidence in order to resolve legal issues, particularly those related to crimes. It comprises a range of scientific disciplines, like forensic toxicology, which focuses on the effects of drugs and toxins on the body, and forensic pathology, which aims to establish cause of death through examination of the corpse. Popular TV shows glamorizing forensics have given viewers unrealistic expectations of the field, a phenomenon dubbed what? More…Discuss

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NEWS: BLOOD ON HANDKERCHIEF LIKELY NOT ROYAL


Blood on Handkerchief Likely Not Royal

A handkerchief long thought to be stained with the blood of guillotined French King Louis XVI is likely inauthentic. DNA analysis of the blood on the cloth suggests it most likely belonged to a brown-eyed, average-height person, whereas the king had blue eyes and was quite tall for his time. The genetics also point to French and Italian lineage, while many of Louis XVI’s ancestors came from Germany and Poland. Why then was the handkerchief stored in an elaborately decorated gourd bearing the inscription, “On January 21, Maximilien Bourdaloue dipped his handkerchief in the blood of Louis XVI after his decapitation”? One theory is that a fraudster created the fake relic for money. More… Discuss

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Stem Cells Created from Adults’ Cells

For the first time, researchers have successfullycreated stem cells from the skin cells of adults. This is considered the first step in developing patient-specific cells lines to treat diseases like heart failure, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, and vision loss, but it is also the first step inhuman reproductive cloning, an issue fraught with ethical dilemmas. To create the stem cells, researchers fused a grown skin cell with an ovum whose DNA had been removed. The resulting embryo contains an inner lining of pluripotent stem cells. Of 39 attempts to create stem cells from adult cells, the researchers succeeded only once for each of their two skin cell donors. More… Discuss

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NEWS: DINGO NO WILD DOG


Dingo No Wild Dog

Analyses of Australian dingo specimens predating the 1788 arrival of European settlers suggest that the dingo is not a kind of wild dog as previously believed but is in fact its own species. Evidence suggests that dingoes made their way to Australia some 3,000 to 5,000 years ago and bred in isolation until domestic dogs were brought to the continent by Europeans. Since that time, dingoes have widely bred with feral dogs, becoming more dog-like in both appearance and DNA and thus more difficult to classify. Given these new findings, researchers have proposed reinstating the species name Canis dingo, first adopted in 1793 by German naturalist Friedrich Meyer.More… Discuss

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WHAT IS: Photo 51


 
 

Photo 51, showing x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA

Photo 51 is the nickname given to an X-ray diffraction image of DNA taken by Raymond Gosling in May 1952, working as a PhD student under the supervision of Rosalind Franklin,[1][2][3][4] at King’s College London in Sir John Randall‘s group. It was critical evidence[5] in identifying the structure of DNA[6]

James Watson was shown the photo by Maurice Wilkins without Rosalind Franklin’s approval or knowledge and along with Francis Crick, Watson used characteristics and features of Photo 51 to develop the chemical model of DNA molecule. In 1962, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Watson, Crick and Wilkins. The prize was not awarded to Franklin; she had died 4 years earlier, making her ineligible for nomination. [7]

The photograph provided key information that was essential for developing a model of DNA.[8][6] The diffraction pattern determined the helical nature of the double helix strands (antiparallel). The outside linings of DNA have a phosphate backbone, and codes for inheritance are inside the helix. Watson and Crick’s calculations from Franklin’s photography gave crucial parameters for the size and structure of the helix. [8][9][10]

Photo 51 became a crucial data source[11] that led to the development of the DNA model and confirmed the prior postulated double helical structure of DNA, which were presented in the articles in the Nature journal by Raymond Gosling.

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: JAMES D. WATSON (1928)


James D. Watson (1928)

Watson is an American biologist who, with Francis Crick, researched the molecular structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) at Cambridge in the 1950s. Their findings earned them the 1962 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Watson later became director of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York and served as director of the National Center for Human Genome Research, which undertook the Human Genome Project. What landmark non-fiction book did Watson write in 1968? More… Discuss

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NEWS: DNA TEST TO TELL IDENTICAL TWINS APART


 

 

DNA Test to Tell Identical Twins Apart

 

 

 

Animation of the structure of a section of DNA...

Animation of the structure of a section of DNA. The bases lie horizontally between the two spiraling strands. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

DNA analysis is an invaluable forensic tool, but it has its limitations. Until now, crimes and paternity cases involving monozygotic—”identical”—twins could not be resolved using DNA, since the genetic makeup of such twins is virtually indistinguishable given current analysis methods. Even though there are minute differences between the genetic codes of identical twins, time constraints and prohibitive costs have kept tests to detect them out of reach of law enforcement. However, a relatively quick and affordable new DNA test could be the answer investigators have been looking for. More… Discuss

 

 

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“YETI” DNA POINTS TO POLAR BEAR RELATIVE


“Yeti” DNA Points to Polar Bear Relative

Most scholars reject the existence of the yeti, a large, hairy, humanoid creature reputed to inhabit theHimalayas, but a respected British geneticist believes there may be something to the stories. He tested hair samples collected from two unidentified animals purported to be yetis and matched the DNA to that of an ancient polar bear jawbone from Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago north of the Arctic Circle, that dates back 40,000 to 120,000 years. This, he says, could mean that an as-yet-unidentified bear species, perhaps some sort of brown bear-polar bear hybrid, resides in the region and is behind at least some yeti sightings.More… Discuss

 

Haiku – Love (poetic thought by George-B)


Haiku -Love  (poetic thought by George-B)

Love as brush fires
Dies down too fast to see how
DNA’s sole winner…

STUDIES REFUTE ARSENIC-BASED LIFE CLAIMS


Studies Refute Arsenic-Based Life Claims

In 2010, scientists announced that they had found a bacterium in California’s arsenic-rich Mono Lake capable of substituting arsenicfor phosphorus—one of six elements considered essential for life—in critical parts of its working biology, including its DNA. The announcement raised the possibility that similar life forms could exist elsewhere in the universe. However, two new scientific papers refute the findings, claiming that there is no evidence arsenic was incorporated into the microbe‘s DNA and that the samples taken in the original study did in fact contain trace amounts of phosphorous that would account for the microbe’s growth. More… Discuss