Tag Archives: Edvard Grieg

fabulous Renditions: Valentina Lisitsa – Edvard Grieg – The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16(two videos)


 Edvard Grieg – The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16(two videos)- Valentina Lisitsa

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Edvard Grieg – Symphonic Dances / Danses Symphoniques


Edvard Grieg – Symphonic Dances / Danses Symphoniques

great compositions/performances: ,Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances / Danses Norvégiennes


Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances / Danses Norvégiennes

Edvard Grieg – Lyric Pieces Op. 65 No. 6 – Wedding Day at Troldhaugen Pianist: Gerhard Oppitz


Group photograph showing Edvard Grieg, Percy G...

Group photograph showing Edvard Grieg, Percy Grainger, Nina Grieg and Julius Rontgen, at Grieg’s home, Troldhaugen, in July 1907 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Historic Musical Bits: Wilhelm Kempff plays Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 (Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik)


Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

Wilhelm Kempff, piano
Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik

Movements:

Allegro affettuoso (A minor) 00:00:00
Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major) 00:15:43
Allegro vivace (A major) 00:21:27
*****************************************************************
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54, is a Romantic concerto by Robert Schumann, completed in 1845. The work premiered in Leipzig on 1 January 1846 with Clara Schumann playing the solo part. Ferdinand Hiller, the work’s dedicatee, conducted.

History

Schumann had earlier worked on several piano concerti: he began one in E-flat major in 1828, from 1829–31 he worked on one in F major, and in 1839, he wrote one movement of a concerto in D minor. None of these works were completed.

In 1841, Schumann wrote a fantasy for piano and orchestra, his Phantasie. His pianist wife Clara urged him to expand this piece into a full piano concerto. In 1845 he added the intermezzo and finale to complete the work. It was the only piano concerto that Schumann completed.

The work may have been used as a model by Edvard Grieg in composing his own Piano Concerto, also in A minor. Grieg’s concerto, like Schumann’s, employs a single powerful orchestral chord at its introduction before the piano’s entrance with a similar descending flourish. Rachmaninov also used the work as a model for his first Piano Concerto.

After this concerto, Schumann wrote two other pieces for piano and orchestra: the Introduction and Allegro Appassionato in G major (Op. 92), and the Introduction and Allegro Concertante in D minor (Op. 134).

Instrumentation

The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani, strings, and solo piano.

Structure

The piece, as marked in the score, is in three movements:

  1. Allegro affettuoso (A minor)

  2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major)

  3. Allegro vivace (A major)

There is no break between these last two movements (attacca subito).

Schumann preferred that the movements be listed in concert programs as only two movements:[citation needed]

  1. Allegro affettuoso
  2. Andantino and Rondo

The three movement listing is the more common form used.

Allegro affettuoso

The piece starts with an energetic strike by strings and timpani, followed by a fierce, descending attack by the piano. The first theme is introduced by the oboe along with wind instruments. The theme is then given to the soloist. Schumann provides great variety with this theme. He first offers it in the A minor key of the piece, then we hear it again in major, and we can also hear small snatches of the tune in a very slow, A flat section. The clarinet is often used against the piano in this movement. Toward the end of the movement, the piano launches into a long cadenza before the orchestra joins in with one more melody and builds for the exciting finish.

Intermezzo

This movement is keyed in F major. The piano and strings open up the piece with a small, delicate tune, which is heard throughout the movement before the cellos and later the other strings finally take the main theme, with the piano mainly used as accompaniment. The movement closes with small glimpses of the first movement’s theme before moving straight into the third movement.

Allegro vivace

The movement opens with a huge run up the strings while the piano takes the main, A major theme. Schumann shows great color and variety in this movement. The tune is regal, and the strings are noble. Though it is in 3/4 timing, Schumann manipulates it so that the time signature is often ambiguous. The piece finishes with a restating of the previous material before finally launching into an exciting finale, and ending with a long timpani roll and a huge chord from the orchestra.

Further reading

 

Best Classical Music, Edvard Grieg – Peer Gynt Suite No 2, op. 55 , great compositions/performances


Edvard Grieg – Peer Gynt Suite No 2, op. 55

Edvard Grieg – Peer Gynt Suite, Åse’s Death | Limburgs Symfonie Orkest, Otto Tausk: great compositions/performances


Edvard GriegPeer Gynt Suite, Åse’s Death | Limburgs Symfonie Orkest, Otto Tausk (2/4)

Grieg: Peer Gynt, Op. 23 – (IX. In the Hall of the Mountain King): great compositions/performances


Grieg Holberg Suite Op. 40 グリーグ ホルベルク組曲 : great compositions/performances


Grieg Holberg Suite Op. 40 グリーグ ホルベルク組曲

Peer Gynt Suites 1 and 2|Incidental music to Henrik Ibsen’s play. (1875, Op. 23), great compositions/performances


Edvard Grieg – Peer Gynt
Suites – 1 and 2

Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975) : The Gadfly, suite (1955): make music part of your life series


Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975) : The Gadfly, suite (1955) – Homage to great Youtubers : imusiciki

 

Andsnes: Grieg Lyric Pieces Op 65, Wedding Day – Leif Ove Andsnes, piano: make music part of your life series


Andsnes: Grieg Lyric Pieces Op 65, Wedding Day

make music part of life series: Edvard Grieg (1843-1907): “Bridal Procession” piano roll


[youtube.com/watch?v=fFc3Xk5bsO0]

Edvard Grieg (1843-1907): “Bridal Procession” piano roll

 

Tomb of Edvard Grieg near Troldhaugen in Norway.

Tomb of Edvard Grieg near Troldhaugen in Norway. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Edvard Grieg was much in demand as a soloist in the latter part of his life. His many short works for piano solo, as well as his famous concerto, led to his music being well known and loved across Europe. He left a number of piano rolls, but more importantly in 1903 he recorded a few records for the G&T company in Paris. These show his spirited and fresh approach to performing his own works. His style is flexible, charming, by turns sometimes capricious, but always controlled within the bounds of impeccable taste and musical understanding.

Some stimulating comparisons and distinctions can be made between Grieg’s own performances and those of Arthur de Greef (whose playing Grieg very much liked), as well recordings by other pianists from the first few decades of the 20th century.

I rather feel that Grieg’s own way with is own works is generally a much better way than we hear them performed now, and which was already being eroded by other younger pianists even when these records were made.

This recording is of a Welte piano roll made by Grieg in 1906. It makes for good comparison with his acoustic recording of 1903.

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make music part of your life series: Grieg Holberg Suite Op. 40 グリーグ ホルベルク組曲 (amateur string orchestra playing in Nagoya Japan.)


“I dedicate this music that fills my heart with  joy to all my friends with all my love, appreciation and hope for a better tomorrow!”

[youtube.com/watch?v=Voo2zH_DZdE]

Grieg Holberg Suite Op. 40 グリーグ ホルベルク組曲

The movements of the suite are:

  1. Praeludium (Allegro vivace) 00:00
  2. Sarabande (Andante) 03:01
  3. Gavotte (Allegretto) 08:27
  4. Air (Andante religioso) 12:31
  5. Rigaudon (Allegro con brio) 20:21

Nagoya Streichersolisten Summer Concert 2012 directed By Kato Akira
We are the amateur string orchestra playing in Nagoya Japan.
Summer concerts are held once a year.
http://ngs.sakuraweb.com

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Statue of Holberg in Bergen, Norway

Statue of Holberg in Bergen, Norway (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Holberg Suite, Op. 40, more properly “From Holberg’s Time” (Norwegian: Fra Holbergs tid, German: Aus Holbergs Zeit), subtitled “Suite in olden style” (Norwegian: Suite i gammel stil, German: Suite im alten Stil), is a suite of five movements based on eighteenth century dance forms, written by Edvard Grieg in 1884 to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Danish-Norwegian humanist playwright Ludvig Holberg.

It exemplifies

Edvard Grieg, who was a strong influence on De...

Edvard Grieg, who was a strong influence on Delius’s earlier music (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

nineteenth century music which makes use of musical styles and forms from the preceding century. It can be compared with Franz Liszt‘s À la Chapelle Sixtine, S.360 (1862) and contrasted with later neoclassical works.

The Holberg Suite was originally composed for the piano, but a year later was adapted for string orchestra. The suite consists of an introduction and a set of dances. It is a charming, early essay in neo-classicism, an attempt to echo as much as was known in Grieg’s time of the music of Holberg’s era.[1]

Although it is not as famous as Grieg’s incidental music from Peer Gynt, which is itself usually performed as arranged in a pair of suites, many critics regard the works as of equal merit.[2

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Edvard Grieg – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16


[youtube.com/watch?v=mD1lFO6dLPo]

Edvard GriegPiano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16

Leif Ove Andsnes, piano.
Berliner Philharmoniker, conducted by Mariss Jansons.

The concerto is in three movements:
  *Allegro molto moderato (A minor)
  *Adagio (D flat major)
  *Allegro moderato molto e marcato – Quasi presto – Andante   maestoso (A minor → F major → A minor → A major)

Edvard Grieg

Cover of Edvard Grieg

The first movement is noted for the timpani roll in the first bar that leads to a dramatic piano flourish. The movement is in the Sonata form. The movement finishes with a virtuosic cadenza and a similar flourish as in the beginning.
The second movement is a lyrical movement in D flat major, which leads directly into the third movement.
The third movement opens in A minor 4/4 time with an energetic theme (Theme 1), which is followed by a lyrical 3/4 theme in F Major (Theme 2). The movement returns to Theme 1. Following this recapitulation is the 3/4 A Major Quasi presto section, which consists of a variation of Theme 1. The movement concludes with the Andate maestoso in A Major (or in A mixolydian), which consists of a dramatic rendition of Theme 2 (as opposed to the lyrical fashion with which Theme 2 is introduced).
Performance time of the whole concerto is around 28 minutes.

Edvard Grieg: Born in Bergen 1843.

Berliner Philharmoniker

Cover of Berliner Philharmoniker

After being taught piano by his mother, he went to the Leipzig Conservatory at the age of 15 to study music where his teachers included Ignaz Moscheles and Carl Reinecke. He then lived in Copenhagen and came under the influence of Niels W.
Gade who encouraged him to compose a symphony and there also met fellow Norwegian composer Rikard Nordraak who inspired Grieg to champion the cause of Norwegian music. He went on to become his country’s greatest and most famous composer who excelled in many genres including orchestral, chamber, solo piano, vocal and choral. His output of purely orchestral music was small but included
his Piano Concerto, Symphonic Dances and the 2 Suites derived from his incidental music to Ibsen’s “Peer Gynt.”

Painters:
Ludvig Skramstad
Nils Hansteen
Philip Barlag
Ole Juul
Thorolf Holmboe
Sophus Jacobsen
Lyder Wenzel Nicolaysen
Niels Björnson Möller

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: E.Grieg:2 Elegiac Melodies, for string orchestra, Op.34-2 Last Spring


[youtube.com/watch?v=YL-BHRD_h0A]

E.Grieg:2 Elegiac Melodies, for string orchestra, Op.34-2 Last Spring

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances, Op. 35 – III. Allegro moderato alla marcia



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Edvard Grieg – Symphonic Dances / Daneses Symphoniques



Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), Norge

Symphonic Dances on Norwegian motifs, Op. 64
– Danses symphoniques sur des motifs norvégiens, op. 64

I. Allegro moderato e marcato
II. Allegro grazioso
III. Allegro giocoso
IV. Andante – Allegro molto e risoluto

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi

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Edvard Grieg – Humoresque op 6 no 1



Tempo di Valse. From Edvard Grieg – Anniversary Collection recorded by Norwegian Pianist Knut Erik Jensen

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Edvard Grieg. “Peer Gynt” Suite No. 1, Op. 46



Edvard Grieg. “Peer Gynt” Suite No. 1, Op. 46
1. Morning Mood 
2. The Death of Åse
3. Anitra’s Dance
4. In the Hall of the Mountain King

Novosibirsk Philharmonic Orchestra, Artistic Director and Chief Conductor
Gintaras Rinkevicius

Was recorded by “Culture”-TV channel on 15 October 2012 at the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall (Moscow)

Эдвард Григ. Сюита “Пер Гюнт” №1, Op. 46
1. Утро
2. Смерть Озе
3. Танец Анитры
4. В пещере горного короля

Новосибирский академический симфонический оркестр, художественный руководитель и главный дирижёр Гинтарас Ринкявичус

Запись телеканала “Культура” с концерта 15 октября 2012 года в Концертном зале имени Чайковского (Москва)

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Edvard Grieg – Symphonic Dances / Dances Symphoniques (Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra Neeme Järvi)



Great Compositions/Performances:  Edvard GriegSymphonic Dances / Dances Symphoniques

Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), Norge

– Symphonic Dances on Norwegian motifs, Op. 64
– Danses symphoniques sur des motifs norvégiens, op. 64

I. Allegro moderato e marcato
II. Allegro grazioso
III. Allegro giocoso
IV. Andante – Allegro molto e risoluto

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi

 

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Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part II (2/2)


A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world. Part II

Compositions name list:

00:00 – Amilcare Ponchielli – Dance of the Hours
05:20 – Bach – Tocata And Fugue In D Minor
12:03 – Beethoven – 5th Symphony (1st movement)
19:08 – Beethoven – 9th Symphony (Ode To Joy)
25:23 – Beethoven – Für Elise (piano version)
28:18 – Carl Orff – O Fortuna (Carmina Burana)
30:57 – Georges Bizet – Habanera
33:06 – Frederic Chopin – Funeral March
38:16 – Delibes – The Flower Duet (Lakmé)
42:49 – Edvard GriegIn the Hall of the Mountain King
45:17 – Franz Liszt – Hungarian Rhapsody No 2 (orchestra version)
55:48 – Georges Bizet – Les Toreadors
58:07 – Händel – Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus
1:02:08 – Mozart – Serenade No 13 (Allegro)
1:07:53 – Offenbach – Can Can
1:10:05 – Rossini – William Tell Overture
1:13:29 – Aram Khachaturian – Sabre Dance
1:15:53 – Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
1:24:19 – Tchaikovsky – Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
1:26:48 – Vivaldi – Four Seasons (spring)

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: George Enescu – Romanian Rhapsody n° 2 in D major, Op. 11 (Orchestre de Montbéliard, Paul Staïcu)



The first Romanian Rhapsody composed at 19 years (together with a second one, both bearing the opus number 11) gained a worldwide fame for its lovely folk tunes (in fact, all Enescu’s works are imbued with such folk lightmotifs) and vivid Romanian rhythms, becoming definitely the best known of all his compositions. Here the Rhapsody No.2 is performed with an infectious empathy by the Romanian conductor Paul Staïcu along with his outstanding musicians of Montbéliard Philharmonic Orchestra.  The performance reveals a mighty symphonist with a keen sense of colours and orchestral textures, a rigorous and honest one devoted to principles and truth, extracting the sap of his composition from folk melodies of his people.  The reputed conductor Paul Staïcu has signed a series of recordings devoted to the complete orchestral oeuvres of his fellow compatriot.  The celebrated Romanian Rhapsody in D major op.11 , more reflexive than its pair no.1, the second Romanian Rhapsody is also a youthful work (written in 1900, when the composer was 19) with persistent folk aromas and picturesque suggestions, aiming at fructifying the popular Romanian musical treasure and meditative side of its sentimentality. The rhapsodic character compounds its appeal and favours its reception by audiences. It is a composition putting grave questions and depicting outrageous realities, filtered through a sensitive conscience. It conveys the sufferance of a moral man facing the immorality of a corrupt and pointless world, reflecting on duties and faiths, on life’s sense and destiny. The torturing mood is magisterially recreated by the inspired baton of Paul Staïcu, the main themes flow unceasingly with a desolating vigour and reach finally a concluding climax affirming an undefeated hope in the majesty of mankind.

  

The Romanian Athenaeum, at about the time of the Rhapsodies’ premiere there in 1903

The two Romanian Rhapsodies, Op. 11, for orchestra, are George Enescu‘s best-known compositions. They were both written in 1901, and first performed together in 1903. The two rhapsodies, and particularly the first, have long held a permanent place in the repertory of every major orchestra. They employ elements of lăutărească music, vivid Romanian rhythms, and an air of spontaneity. They exhibit exotic modal coloring, with some scales having ‘mobile’ thirds, sixths or sevenths, creating a shifting major/minor atmosphere, one of the characteristics of Romanian lăutărească music.[1][not in citation given] They also incorporate some material found in the later drafts of his Poème roumaine, Op. 1.[2]

File:Ateneul Român stage.jpg

The stage of the Athenaeum in Bucharest

The two Romanian Rhapsodies were composed in Paris, and premiered together in a concert at the Romanian Athenaeumin Bucharest which also included the world premiere of Enescu’s First Suite for Orchestra, Op. 9 (1903). The composer conducted all three of his own works, which were preceded on the programme by Berlioz’s Overture to Les francs-jugesand Schumann’s Symphony No. 1, both conducted by Eduard Wachmann. The concert took place on 23 February 1903[3](according to the Julian calendar in use in Romania at that time; 8 March 1903 Gregorian).[4] The Second Rhapsody was played first, and Enescu maintained this order of performance throughout his life.[5]

Rhapsody No. 2 in D major

The Second Rhapsody, like the first, was completed in 1901,[14][7] but is more inward and reflective. Its essential character is not dance, but song.[15][5] It is based on the popular 19th-century ballad “Pe o stîncă neagră, într-un vechi castel” (“On a dark rock, in an old castle”) which, like the opening melody of the First Rhapsody Enescu may have learned from the lăutar Chioru,[1] though again there is some doubt whether Enescu actually remembered it from Chioru.[10] After a development culminating in a canonic presentation, this theme is joined by a dance tune, “Sîrba lui Pompieru” (“Sîrba of the Fireman”), followed shortly afterward by the second half of a folksong, “Văleu, lupu mă mănîncă” (“Aiee, I’m being devoured by a wolf!”), which is treated in canon.[16] Toward the end there is a brief moment of animation, bringing to mind the spirit of country lăutari, but the work ends quietly.[17]

Unlike the First Rhapsody, there is no controversy at all about the scoring of the Second, which is given in the published score as: 3 flutes, 2 oboes, cor anglais, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets in C, 3 trombones, 2 timpani, cymbal, 2 harps, first violins, second violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.[18]

 

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Edvard Grieg two Melodies for strings, op. 53 No. 1: Norsk


[youtube.com/watch?v=pNPVwnMCpjQ]
Edvard Grieg (1843-1907)

To Melodier, Op. 53 (1890)
1. Norsk
Norwegian Chamber Orchestra conducted by Terje Tonnesen
Editor:First edition
Publisher Info.:Leipzig, C.F. Peters, n.d.(1891). Plate 7628.

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Sviatoslav Richter Plays Edvard Grieg’s Lyric Pieces Op.65 – 6 “Wedding day at Troldhaugen”


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
“Wedding Day at Troldhaugen” (Norwegian: Bryllupsdag på Troldhaugen) is a musical piece composed by Edvard Grieg.[n 1][1] It is the sixth piano piece in the eighth book of his Lyric Pieces, bearing the opus number 65. There has been some discussion about the quality and proportion of this composition in relation to the whole book.[2]

Description

Originally called “Gratulanterne kommer” (The well-wishers are coming),[3][4] it was written in 1896 as a memorial of the 25th wedding anniversary of Grieg and his wife Nina.[5] The anniversary celebration had been held in the Fossli Hotel near the Vøringsfossen waterfall in June 1892. Grieg and his wife celebrated their wedding anniversary with Borre and Nancy Giertsen. Nancy was the sister of Marie Beyer, then married to Frants Beyer, Grieg’s best friend. She belonged to their closest circle of friends at Troldhaugen. During the occasion a guest book was ready to take contributions from all the guests.

Grieg gave the work its final title in 1897 when he compiled Book VIII, Op. 65, of his Lyric Pieces. The work’s festive first section describes congratulations and best wishes that are given by the guests to the newlyweds; the second section is reflective and subdued.
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Great Composers/Compositions: Grieg – Holberg Suite, Op. 40 (”From Holberg’s Time”)



The Holberg Suite was originally composed for the piano and was adapted for string orchestra a year later. Not as famous as Peer Gynt, but seen by many critics as equal.
Berliner Philharmoniker / Herbert von Karajan
00:00 1. Praeludium
03:02 2. Sarabande 
07:18 3. Gavotte 
11:07 4. Air 
16:58 5. Rigaudon

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Edvard Grieg. Symphonic Dances No.1



Youth Symphony Orchestra Mussorgsky College of St. Petersburg
Conductor Lev Dunaev
Молодёжный симфонический оркестр музыкального колледжа им.М.П.Мусоргского (Санкт-Петербург)
Дирижёр Лев Дунаев
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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances / Danses Norvégiennes



Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), Norge

– Danses norvegiénnes (pour orchestre), op. 35
– Norwegian Dances (for Orchestra), Op. 35

I. Allegro marcato
II. Allegro tranquille e grazioso
III. Allegro moderato alla marcia
IV. Allegro molto

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi

 

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Sviatoslav Richter plays Grieg Lyric Pieces – Op.65 No.6 ‘Wedding day at Troldhaugen’


Sviatoslav Richter plays Grieg Lyric Pieces – Op.65 No.6 ‘Wedding day at Troldhaugen

  • The image of Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richte...

    The image of Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richter (1915-1997) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    Sviatoslav Richter

    Pianist
  • Sviatoslav Teofilovich Richter was a Soviet pianist well known for the depth of his interpretations, virtuoso technique, and vast repertoire. He is widely considered one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. Wikipedia
 

 

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Frederick Delius – On Hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring


On Hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring is a tone poem composed in 1912 by Frederick Delius CH; it was first performed in Leipzig on 23 October 1913. It is the first of “Two Pieces for Small Orchestra”, the second piece being Summer Night on the River, although these have for many years existed separately on recordings and in the concert hall.

The piece opens with a slow three-bar sequence; its first theme is an exchange of cuckoo calls, first for oboe, then for divided strings. The second theme is scored for first violins, and is taken from a Norwegian folk song, “In Ola Valley”, which was brought to his attention by the Australian composer and folk-song arranger Percy Grainger. (The theme was also quoted by Edvard Grieg in his 19 Norwegian Folksongs, Op. 66.) The clarinet returns with the cuckoo calls before the piece ends in pastoral fashion. (Courtesy of Wikipedia).

I took these photographs of places in and around the Derbyshire Peak District: places just outside include the villages of Kirk Ireton and Brassington, which I shot today, and after a very long Winter and cold spring it truly felt like the first day of Spring! I have seen swallows return within the last week, but as yet haven’t heard a cuckoo. It won’t be long now though, and is always a joy!

For more videos and other information about the Peak District please visit Let’s Stay Peak District at http://www.peakdistrict-nationalpark.com

Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields
Conductor: Sir Neville Marriner
A Decca Recording

 

Edvard Grieg Elegies For Piano, Op 34 II Last Spring



Edvard Grieg Elegies For Piano, Op 34 II Last Spring

 

Eva Knardahl: Edward Grieg – 25 Norwegian Folk Songs and Dances, Op.17 (a beautiful interpretation!)



Eva Knardahl, pianist

 

Edvard Hagerup Grieg: Peer Gynt – London, 1957 (Hollweg; dir. Sir Thomas Beecham)



Ilse Hollweg, soprano
Beecham Choral Society Chor
Royal Philarmonic Orchestra
dir. Sir Thomas Beecham
rec. november 1956 to april 1957

 

Edvard Grieg – In Autumn, Op. 11



Title of Composition: In Autumn, Op. 11
Composer: Edvard Grieg
Created in: 1888
Orchestra: Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Neeme Jarvi
Recorded in: 1993

This specific recording of In Autumn is part of a 6-CD box set that is available for purchase at either Arkivmusic:
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/a…

Or at Amazon (MP3 is also available):
http://www.amazon.com/Grieg-Complete-…

The box set also includes Piano Concerto in A minor, Symphonic Dances, Lyric Suite, and the complete version of Peer Gynt (all of which are also composed by Grieg).

You can also find other recordings of In Autumn at Arkivmusic:
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/D…

The images in this video are not my own.
The image at 0:21 can be found here:http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/v…
The image at 3:32 can be found here:http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/v…
The image at 7:11 can be found here:http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/v…

This recording of In Autumn is owned by Deutsche Grammophon.

 

Edvard Grieg. “Peer Gynt” Suite No. 1, Op. 46



Edvard Grieg. “Peer GyntSuite No. 1, Op. 46
1. Morning Mood 
2. The Death of Åse
3. Anitra’s Dance
4. In the Hall of the Mountain King

Novosibirsk Philharmonic Orchestra, Artistic Director and Chief Conductor
Gintaras Rinkevicius

Was recorded by “Culture”-TV channel on 15 October 2012 at the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall (Moscow)

 

Edvard Grieg – Piano Concerto in A minor Op. 16



Allegro Molto Moderato (0:02) [13.11]
Adagio (13:14) [6.05]
Allegro Moderato Molto E Marcato Quasi Presto Andante Maestoso (19:20) [10.20]

This concerto in three movements was composed by Edvard Grieg in 1868.
Performer Dubravka Tomsic
Radio Symphony Orchestra Ljubljana
Conductor: Anton Nanut

Music of The Orchard Music, APM Music and IODA

 

Grieg Holberg Suite Op. 40



00:00  Praludium 
03:01   Sarabande 
08:27   Gavotte
12:31    Air
20:21   Rigaudon
Nagoya Streichersolisten Summer Concert 2012 directed By Kato Akira

We are the amateur string orchestra playing in Nagoya Japan.
Summer concerts are held once a year.
http://ngs.sakuraweb.com

 

Edvard Grieg – Lyric Suite / Suite Lyrique



Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), Norge

Lyric Suite, Op. 54

– Shepherd Boy
– Bell-Ringing
– Norwegian March
– Notturno
– March of the Trolls

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi

 



1. The wounded heart
2. Last Spring

Willem Mengelberg
Born: March 28, 1871 – Utrecht,
Holland Died: March 21, 1951 – Chur, Switzerland Grieg(1843-1907)

In the late 1860s Grieg married his cousin, Nina Hagerup, and settled in Christiania (now much less charmingly named Oslo). Life couldn’t have been easy, eking out a living from teaching and conducting, particularly as his over-zealous studies in Leipzig had permanently damaged his health. Then, in 1874, still aged only 31, came a stroke of good fortune: he was awarded a life annuity from the Norwegian government (nice work if you can get it!). Maybe he isn’t exactly a “front rank” composer, but his music is equally capable of charming the simple soul (like me) as it is the not so simple (like Liszt).  Continue reading

Edvard Grieg – Funeral March for Rikard Nordraak



Edvard Grieg (15 June 1843 4 September 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist who composed in the Romantic period. Grieg is renowned as a nationalist composer, drawing inspiration from Norwegian folk music.

Rikard Nordraak was a very good friend of his, and he was also a composer. When he died, in 1866, Grieg composed this funeral march in his honor. Continue reading

Edvard Grieg, Norwegian Dances op. 35: Allegretto Tranquillo E Grazioso


 

L’orchestre de Chambre Lakeshore Chamber Orchestra,
Stewart Grant, Guest Conductor / Chef d’Orchestre invité,
Canada Day Concert fête du Canada,
Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances, op 35 – Allegretto tranquillo e grazioso, Part 2 of 4

One of the most beautiful dance ever composed. I always liked listening to it and hope you will to.