Tag Archives: Edward Elgar

Mozart: Piano concerto n. No. 21 in C major, K.467 Pollini-Muti: great compositions/performances


Mozart: Piano concerto n. No. 21 in C major, K.467 Pollini-Muti

Edward Elgar – “Falstaff”- Symphonic study in C minor op. 68 – III Allegro Molto: make music part of your life series


Edward Elgar – “Falstaff“- Symphonic study in C minor op. 68 – III Allegro Molto

Nursery Suite: Aubade (Awake): make music part of your life series


Edward Elgar – Allegro for strings, Op.47 & Serenade for strings, Op.20: make music part of your life series


Edward Elgar – Allegro for strings, Op.47 & Serenade for strings, Op.20

Vladimir Horowitz 1950 / Chopin Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35 “Funeral March”: unique musical moments



From:  ss sabu  ss sabu

Vladimir Horowitz 1950 / Chopin Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35 “Funeral March”

Vladimir Horowitz 1950
Chopin
Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35 “Funeral March”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chopin, 1835

Frédéric Chopin‘s Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35, popularly known as The Funeral March, was completed in 1839 at Nohant, near Châteauroux in France. However, the third movement, whence comes the sonata’s common nickname, had been composed as early as 1837.

The sonata comprises four movements:

  1. Grave – Doppio movimento

  2. Scherzo

  3. Marche funèbre: Lento

  4. Finale: Presto

Funeral march

As noted above, the third movement is structured as a funeral march played with a Lento interlude. While the term “funeral march” is perhaps a fitting description of the 3rd movement, complete with the Lento Interlude in D-flat major, the expression “Chopin’s Funeral March” is used commonly to describe only the funeral march proper (in B-flat minor).

It was transcribed for full orchestra in 1933 by the English composer Sir Edward Elgar (in D minor), and its first performance was at his own memorial concert the next year. It was also transcribed for large orchestra by the conductor Leopold Stokowski; this version was recorded for the first time by Matthias Bamert.

The emotive “funeral march” has become well known in popular culture. It was used at the state funerals of John F. Kennedy, Sir Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher and those of Soviet leaders, including Leonid Brezhnev. It was also played in the funeral of the Spanish poet Miguel Hernández and at thegraveside during Chopin’s own burial at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.

 

great compsitions/performances: Sviatoslav Richter – Beethoven – Piano Sonata No 9 in E major, Op 14


[youtube.com/watch?v=bgSOrXR0cfs]

Sviatoslav Richter – Beethoven – Piano Sonata No 9 in E major, Op 14

00:00 Allegro
06:39 Allegretto. Maggiore
12:53 Rondo. Allegro comodo

Sviatoslav Richter, piano

great compositions/performances: Edward Elgar – Salut d’amour Op 12 Ion Marin conduction the Berliner Philharmoniker


[youtube.com/watch?v=tYrj9jgxC8c]

Edward Elgar: Salut d’amour Op 12

Uploaded on Jul 3, 2011/94,152 views

Berliner Philharmoniker – Edward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 2010

von der Berliner Waldbühne, Dirigent Ion Marin

view more beautiful videos at fritz51117

make music part of your life series: Antonin Dvorak – Romance in F minor Op 11 – Violin and piano


[youtube.com/watch?v=T0Fv9jKeKX8]

Antonin Dvorak – Romance in F minor Op 11 – Violin and piano

Dvorak museum, Prague

Dvorak museum, Prague (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Antonin Dvorak – Czech Composer, born September 8, 1841 and died 1 May 1904.

make music part of your life series: a marvelous composition – Antonin Dvorak American Suite in A, Op. 98b


[youtube.com/watch?v=ytgf2TV3rAw]

Antonin Dvorak American Suite in A, Op. 98b

01 – American Suite in A, Op.98b – Andante con moto 0:01
02 – American Suite in A, Op.98b — Allegro 4:55
03 – American Suite in A, Op.98b – Moderato (alla pollacca) 09:19
04 – American Suite in A, Op.98b — Andante 14:04
05 – American Suite in A, Op.98b — Allegro 17:38

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

NSRW Antonin Dvorak

NSRW Antonin Dvorak (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

**** The American Suite in A major (Czech: Suita A dur), Op. 98b, B. 190, is an orchestral suite written in 1894–1895 by Czech composer Antonín Dvořák.

English: Antonin Dvorak in Spillville (Iowa) Č...

English: Antonin Dvorak in Spillville (Iowa) Česky: Antonín Dvořák ve Spillvilu (Iowa) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


Background

 

 

 

**** Dvořák initially wrote the Suite in A major for piano, Op. 98, B. 184, in New York between February 19 and March 1, 1894.[1] He orchestrated it in two parts more than a year after his return to the United States and immediately before his departure for Europe. The piano version was performed soon after its composition, but the orchestral version waited some years. The orchestral version of the American Suite was first played in concert in 1910 and not published until 1911, seven years after Dvořák’s death in 1904.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Edward Elgar – Chanson de Matin Opus 15 – No 2


[youtube.com/watch?v=6Cb6-OSIVMo]

Edward Elgar – Chanson de Matin Opus 15 – No 2

A tribute to Sir Edward Elgar – 1857 / 1934
The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by George Weldon

Enhanced by Zemanta

Historic Performances: Jacqueline du Pre plays Elgar Cello Concerto BBCSO Barbirolli (1967 Live Stereo)


[youtube.com/watch?v=1LULTpqHNU8]

Jacqueline du Pre plays Elgar Cello Concerto BBCSO Barbirolli (1967 Live Stereo)

Sir Edward Elgar
Cello Concerto in E minor Op 85

Jacqueline du Pre
BBC Symphony Orchestra
Sir John Barbirolli

00:00 Adagio – Moderato
07:48 Lento – Allegro molto
12:18 Adagio
17:40 Allegro – Moderato – Allegro, ma non troppo – Poco più lento – Adagio.

(Live Recording: 3 Jan 1967 in Prague)

Enhanced by Zemanta

GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Berliner Philharmoniker – Edward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 2010


[youtube.com/watch?v=tYrj9jgxC8c]

Berliner Philharmoniker – Edward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 2010

Berliner Philharmoniker – Edward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 2010

von der Berliner Waldbühne, Dirigent Ion Marin

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Edward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 – Berliner Philharmoniker, Ion Marin Conducting 2010



Berliner PhilharmonikerEdward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 2010
von der Berliner Waldbühne, Dirigent Ion Marin

For other uses, see Salut D’Amour (disambiguation).
Salut d'Amour by Elgar general cover 1899.JPG

Salut d’Amour, Op. 12, is a musical work composed by Edward Elgar in 1888, originally written for violin and piano.

History[edit]

Elgar finished the piece in July 1888, when he was engaged to be married to Caroline Alice Roberts, and he called it “Liebesgruss” (‘Love’s Greeting’) because of Miss Roberts’ fluency in German. When he returned home to London on 22 September from a holiday at the house of his friend Dr. Charles Buck, in Settle, he presented it to her as an engagement present. Alice, for her part, offered him a poem called “The Wind at Dawn” which she had written years before and which he soon set to music.[1]

The dedication was in French: “à Carice”. “Carice” was a combination of his wife’s names Caroline Alice, and was the name to be given to their daughter born two years later.

It was not published by Schott & Co. until a year later, and the first editions were for violin and piano, piano solo, cello and piano, and for small orchestra. Few copies were sold until Schott changed the title to “Salut d’Amour” with Liebesgruss as a sub-title, and the composer’s name as ‘Ed. Elgar’. The French title, Elgar realised, would help the work to be sold not only in France but in other European countries: Schott was a German publisher, with offices in MainzLondonParis and Brussels.

The first public performance was of the orchestral version, at a Crystal Palace concert on 11 November 1889, conducted by August Manns.

The work’s first recording was made in 1915 for The Gramophone Company with an orchestra conducted by the composer.

Woo Thou Sweet Music by Elgar song cover.jpg

“Salut d’amour” is one of Elgar’s best-known works and has inspired numerous arrangements for widely varying instrumental combinations. It was even arranged as a song “Woo thou, Sweet Music” with words by A. C. Bunten.[2]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Composition/Performances: Fritz Kreisler plays Liebesfreud



Fritz Kreisler -Violin
Franz Rupp – Piano
(recorded 1938)

 

English: Fritz Kreisler (1875 – 1962), Austria...

English: Fritz Kreisler (1875 – 1962), Austria-born American violinist and composer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Edward Elgar – Allegro for strings, Op.47 & Serenade for strings, Op.20



1. Introduction and Allegro for string quartet & string orchestra in G major, Op. 47 

Serenade for strings in E Minor, Op.20: 
2. Allegro piacevole
3. Larghetto
4. Allegretto

The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor, Barry Wordsworth.

Sir Edward Elgar’s Introduction and Allegro for Strings, Op. 47, was composed in 1905 for performance in an all-Elgar concert by the newly formed London Symphony Orchestra. Scored for string quartet and string orchestra, Elgar composed it to show off the players’ virtuosity. Continue reading

Edward Elgar’s “Enigma Variations” (No. 9-12)



From Lindorossini:  “At the end of an overlong day laden with teaching and other duties, Edward Elgar lit a cigar, sat at his piano and began idling over the keys. To amuse his wife, the composer began to improvise a tune and played it several times, turning each reprise into a caricature of the way one of their friends might have played it or of their personal characteristics. “I believe that you are doing something which has never been done before,” exclaimed his wife”. Thus, as the legend tells us, was born one of music’s great works of original conception, and Elgar’s greatest large-scale “hit”: the Enigma Variations.

The enigma is twofold: each of the 14 variations refers to a friend of Elgar’s, who is depicted by the nature of the music, or by sonic imitation of laughs, vocal inflections, or quirks, or by more abstract allusions. The other enigma is the presence of a larger “unheard” theme which is never stated but which according to the composer is very well known. A third enigma formed, when I decided to upload the variations, as I am completely baffled about the identity of either the conductor or the orchestra.

But getting back to the work itself, the work contains some most charming and interesting music.

As the piece is about thirty minutes long, I’ve divided it into three parts, each one finishing with a furious allegro passage (and, interestingly enough, the variations go well this way).

VIII. W.N. (allegretto0:00), Winifred Norbury, a gracious and gentle friend, hence the relatively relaxed atmosphere. At the end of this variation, a single violin note is held over into the next variation, the most celebrated of the set. The gentle chirping of the flutes, wonderfully contrasted by the plucking of the strings, paints a most gracious person.

IX. Nimrod (andante; 1:55), Augustus Jaeger, Elgar’s close friend. It is said that this variation, as well as an attempt to capture what Elgar saw as Jaeger’s noble character, depicts a night-time walk the two of them had, during which they discussed the slow movements of Ludwig van Beethoven. The first eight bars resemble, and have been said to represent, the beginning of the second movement of Beethoven’s Eighth Piano Sonata (Pathetique). The name of the variation cunningly refers to an Old Testament patriarch described as a mighty hunter, the name Jaeger being German for hunter. Though certainly the most celebrated of all the variations, I find myself admiring, rather than truly enjoying it, unlike, for example, the previous variation.

X. Dorabella (allegretto:  5:57), Dora Penny, whose infectious laugh is depicted in a repeated line for the the woodwinds.

XI. G.R.S. (allegro di molto: 8:33), George Sinclair, an organist. More specifically, the variation also depicts Sinclair’s bulldog Dan, and a walk by the River Wye with Sinclair and Elgar when Dan fell into the river: one can actually see the dog running back and forth to and away from his master in a frenzy… and then falling into the water. 

Today’s Birthday: Gerald Finzi (1901-1956)



Gerald Finzi – Eclogue for Piano and Strings  Performed by the English String Orchestra

Gerald Raphael Finzi (14 July 1901 – 27 September 1956) was a British composer. Finzi is best known as a song-writer, but also wrote in other genres. Large-scale compositions by Finzi include the cantata Dies natalis for solo voice and string orchestra, and his concertos for cello and clarinet. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_Finzi)

http://www.geraldfinzi.org/indexb78c.html?page=about/biography.html

http://geraldfinzi.com/