Tag Archives: English Channel

image of the day: D-Day Invasion



D-Day Invasion

On June 6, 1944, Allied forces under the overall command of General Dwight D. Eisenhower–shown here paying an eleventh-hour visit to the men of the U.S. 101st Airborne Division–landed on five beachheads in Normandy, France. In addition, U.S. and British airborne forces landed behind the German lines and U.S. Army Rangers scaled the cliffs at Pointe de Hoc. By the end of the day, the Allies had established a tenuous beachhead that would lead to an offensive that pinned Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich between two pincers–the Western Allies and the already advancing Soviets–accelerating the end of World War II.

Photo: National Archives

this day in the yesteryear: D-Day: The Allies Land on Normandy Beaches (1944)


D-Day: The Allies Land on Normandy Beaches (1944)

The Battle of Normandy during World War II was fought between the German forces occupying Western Europe and the invading Allied armies. More than 156,000 troops crossed the English Channel during the initial invasion, which remains the largest amphibious landing in history. The campaign continued for more than two months and concluded with the liberation of Paris. Of the Allies’ five landing points, Omaha Beach proved to be the most deadly. How many troops were killed there that day? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: HARRIET QUIMBY FLIES OVER ENGLISH CHANNEL (1912)


Harriet Quimby Flies over English Channel (1912)

In 1911, Harriet Quimby earned the first pilot’s license issued to a woman in the United States. Less than a year later, Quimby became the first woman to fly across the English Channel. She continued piloting aircrafts until her tragic death in 1912, when she was tossed from her airplane after it unexpectedly pitched forward. Despite the importance of her flight over the English Channel, the feat barely made the newspapers at the time because it was eclipsed by what major event? More… Discuss

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Claude Debussy – La Mer



La Mer” L.109, (The Sea), is an orchestral composition by Claude Debussy. It was started in 1903 in France and completed in 1905 on the English Channel coast in Eastbourne. The premiere was given by the Lamoureux Orchestra under the direction of Camille Chevillard on 15 October 1905 in Paris. “La Mer” is a composition of huge suggestion and subtlety in its rich depiction of the ocean, which combines unusual orchestration with daring impressionistic harmonies. The work has proven very influential, and its use of sensuous tonal colours and its orchestration methods have influenced many later film scores. While the structure of the work places it outside of both absolute music and programme music as those terms were understood in the early 20th century, it obviously uses descriptive devices to suggest wind, waves and the ambience of the sea. But structuring a piece around a nature subject without any literary or human element to it – neither people, nor mythology, nor ships are suggested in the piece – also was highly unusual at the time.
Debussy called his work “three symphonic sketches,” avoiding the loaded term symphony; yet the work is sometimes called a symphony; it consists of two powerful outer movements framing a lighter, faster piece which acts as a type of scherzo. 
“La Mer” is divided inot three movements:
1. “De l’aube à midi sur la mer” (from dawn to midday on the sea);
2. “Jeux de vagues” (Play of the Waves);
3. “Dialogue du vent et de la mer” (Dialogue of the wind and the sea).

Conductor: Vladimir Ashkenazy & Cleveland Orchestra

 

Claude Debussy – La Mer



La Mer” L.109, (The Sea), is an orchestral composition by Claude Debussy. It was started in 1903 in France and completed in 1905 on the English Channel coast in Eastbourne. The premiere was given by the Lamoureux Orchestra under the direction of Camille Chevillard on 15 October 1905 in Paris. “La Mer” is a composition of huge suggestion and subtlety in its rich depiction of the ocean, which combines unusual orchestration with daring impressionistic harmonies. The work has proven very influential, and its use of sensuous tonal colours and its orchestration methods have influenced many later film scores. While the structure of the work places it outside of both absolute music and programme music as those terms were understood in the early 20th century, it obviously uses descriptive devices to suggest wind, waves and the ambience of the sea. But structuring a piece around a nature subject without any literary or human element to it – neither people, nor mythology, nor ships are suggested in the piece – also was highly unusual at the time.
Debussy called his work “three symphonic sketches,” avoiding the loaded term symphony; yet the work is sometimes called a symphony; it consists of two powerful outer movements framing a lighter, faster piece which acts as a type of scherzo. 
“La Mer” is divided inot three movements:
1. “De l’aube à midi sur la mer” (from dawn to midday on the sea);
2. “Jeux de vagues” (Play of the Waves);
3. “Dialogue du vent et de la mer” (Dialogue of the wind and the sea).

Conductor: Vladimir Ashkenazy & Cleveland Orchestra

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: MULTIMILLIONAIRE ADVENTURER STEVE FOSSETT GOES MISSING (2007)


Multimillionaire Adventurer Steve Fossett Goes Missing (2007)

After earning millions as a stockbroker and investment consultant, Fossett began a second career as a sports adventurer. He swam the English Channel in 1985 and set many sailing records, but he is best known for his long-distance solo aviation triumphs, like becoming the first person to fly solo nonstop around the world in a balloon in 2002. He disappeared while flying a private plane in Nevada in September 2007 and was declared dead five months later. When was his crash site finally discovered? More…Discuss