Tag Archives: English language

A lot of Love, poetic thought by George B. (the smudge and other poems Page) inspired and with dedication to ‘Como Agua Para Chocolate’, by the Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel


Lots of Love, poetic thought by George B.
(the smudge and other poems Page)

She first mixed the ingredients,
then added salt and sweat,
and other delicate things to the dough
she mixed and beat, and slammed and slammed
with powerful fists,
before

rolling
flattening
spreading the dough
on whole the top of the  board –
she did that many time…

Now  it all became quiet,
a quiet wait while

inside that silence the yeast was waking up the dough , 
engulfed in the mixture,
almost…ready to burst…

the oven preheated,

“time to open the gates to the baking heat”, she thought…

the moist heat of the oven –
time to release the moisture within –

let it float,
once more all around,  free,  in the boxed heat.

Now, all that was left was…cookies….while,
still very special, 

cookies,

with a sprinkle of Cinnamon
nutmeg
trace of… cloves
and  lots of love.

– George-B.

Inspired, and with dedication to Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel,   and her popular  novel Like Water for Chocolate (Spanish: Como agua para chocolate), the  popular novel published in 1989,  and the amazing magical realism by which  food is  one of the major themes in the story which is seen throughout the story. It is used very creatively to represent the characters feelings and situations.

Copyright © 2015 [George Bost]. All Rights Reserved.

 

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Alexander Glazunov Symphony No 5 in B flat major, Op 55, great compositions/performances


Alexander Glazunov Symphony No 5 in B flat major, Op 55

Carl Maria Von Weber: Clarinet Quintet in B flat, op. 34 , great compositions/performances


Weber: Clarinet Quintet in B flat, op. 34

intriguingly So: Continuum Season 3 Opportunity to know a different reality…alternate, but weaved within this reality!


Continuum season 3 (click to access)

Continuum season 3 (click to access)

RIDAY, APRIL 25, 2014 4:37 PM

Continuum Episodes – Now With Enhanced Video!

Can’t get enough Continuum? Well, get ready to watch Season 3 like you’ve never seen it before—with our all-new Enhanced Video experience! Watch interactive full episodes featuring original bonus webisodes, extended scenes, and behind-the-scenes content that you won’t find anywhere else, all fully immersed inside full episodes of Continuum, Season 3.

Bonus content appears on-screen at key moments in each episode—all designed to take you deeper into the world of the show. Behind-the-scenes pop-up commentary is indicated by the grey dots that appear along the episode progress bar, while the orange dots indicate original video content. To view the videos, click on the pop-up text when it appears on-screen. The episode you are watching will pause, and resume once the bonus clip has concluded.As always, if you want to watch the episode without bonus content, you can toggle the red caption icon located next to the closed caption button.
Video Indicator

Now go back and rewatch episodes 1-5! And please (as always) feel free to share your thoughts with us in the comments.

http://www.showcase.ca/video#continuum/video

Liszt Consolation D flat major No.3 (S.172), Valentina Lisitsa: Great compositions/performances


thsi pressed for your health: Lower IQ seen after exposure to plastic chemicals — FRANCE 24 (@FRANCE24)


this pressed for your right to know: Photos: ‘Living On A Dollar A Day’ Features Stark Portraits of Humanity|NewsWeek


Filed Under: World

10_17_DollarDay_Cover

Living on a dollar a day seems nearly unfathomable, but roughly one in six people in our world do on a daily basis. For her work Living On A Dollar A Day, photographer Renée C. Byer teamed up with San Francisco nonprofit The Forgotten International and ventured to four continents to capture intimate stills of people affected by extreme poverty.

“For me it’s very important to go behind the scenes and into their home to find pieces of daily life that everyone can relate to,” Byers said in an interview with National Geographic. “So people aren’t seeing a photo that will push them away, but will pull them back into the scene. So they’re not being overwhelmed by the emotion, but they’re able to relate to the emotion. So that they can imagine themselves trying to live this life, and in some way, hopefully, they could help.”

via

Photos: ‘Living On A Dollar A Day’ Features Stark Portraits of Humanity | newsweek

Esperanto


Esperanto

Esperanto is an artificial language that was introduced in 1887 by Dr. L.L. Zamenhof, a Polish linguist. His goal was to ease communication between speakers of different languages. Its words are derived from roots commonly found in European languages and are spelled as pronounced. Grammar is simple and regular. Although no nation has officially adopted Esperanto, it has more than one million speakers and has been taught in schools throughout the world. What is the origin of the name “Esperanto”? More… Discuss

word: antipathy


antipathy 

Definition: (noun) A strong feeling of aversion or repugnance.
Synonyms: aversion, distaste
Usage: He divined the fanatical love of freedom in her, the deep-seated antipathy for restraint of any sort. Discuss.

A la découverte de l’encyclopédie Larousse (access here)


A la découverte de l'encyclopédie Larousse

A la découverte de l’encyclopédie Larousse (access here)

quotation: I could see that, if not actually disgruntled, he was far from being gruntled. P. G. Wodehouse


I could see that, if not actually disgruntled, he was far from being gruntled.

P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975) Discuss

word: gargantuan


gargantuan 

Definition: (adjective) Of immense size, volume, or capacity; gigantic.
Synonyms: elephantine, giant, jumbo
Usage: He was full to capacity after polishing off a gargantuan, five-course meal. Discuss.

word: garrulous


garrulous

Definition: (adjective) Given to excessive and often trivial or rambling talk.
Synonyms: chatty, gabby, loquacious, talkative, talky
Usage: One day the elder Pokrovski came to see us, and chattered in a brisk, cheerful, garrulous sort of way. Discuss.

The Danger, poetic thought by George-B (©Always) (the smudge and other poems)


The Danger, poetic thought by George-B (©Always)

The Danger lurking in plain sight,
disguised
as benevolent face…
It holds a book,
of broken promises,
some secrets to be kept…
How more can one deceive,
another one with,
But selling all there is,
and getting bloated at it…
The epics of persona selling,
is just as old as slave trade,
yes, it is…

WORD: chagrin


chagrin 

Definition: (noun) A keen feeling of mental unease, as of annoyance or embarrassment, caused by failure, disappointment, or a disconcerting event.
Synonyms: mortification, humiliation
Usage: Much to my chagrin, my rival won the election hands down. Discuss.
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WORD: ENDEAVOR


endeavor 

Definition: (verb) Attempt by employing effort.
Synonyms: strive
Usage: The candidate promised to endeavor to improve the quality of life in the inner city, but once in office, she did nothing of the sort. Discuss.
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word: LILLIPUTIAN


lilliputian 

Definition: (adjective) Very small.
Synonyms: bantamdiminutiveflyspeckmidgetpetitetiny
Usage: How am I supposed to fit everything I will need for summer camp in this lilliputian trunk?! Discuss.

 

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Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring


[youtube.com/watch?v=3jGbQfIXh44&feature=c4-overview&list=UU6sujip0vq_jTW69yQkKS2w]

Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring is the most common English title of the 10th and last movement of the cantata Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben, BWV 147 (“Heart and Mouth and Deed and Life”), composed by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1716 and 1723. Written during his first year in Leipzig, Germany, this chorale movement is one of Bach’s most enduring works.

Jesu, joy of man’s desiring,

Holy wisdom, love most bright;

Drawn by Thee, our souls aspiring

Soar to uncreated light.

Word of God, our flesh that fashioned,

With the fire of life impassioned,

Striving still to truth unknown,

Soaring, dying round Thy throne.

Through the way where hope is guiding,

Hark, what peaceful music rings;

Where the flock, in Thee confiding,

Drink of joy from deathless springs.

Theirs is beauty’s fairest pleasure;

Theirs is wisdom’s holiest treasure.

Thou dost ever lead Thine own

In the love of joys unknown.

Enjoy, It’s all good!

 

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New at euzicasa: WIDGET_Classic Cat: The Free Classical Music Directory (one click away)


WIDGET_Classic Cat: The Free Classical Music Directory (one click away)

WIDGET_Classic Cat: The Free Classical Music Directory (one click away)

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New at euzicasa: Link-Widget_to_AllMusic: Try it now!


AllMusic (one click away)

AllMusic (one click away)

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Stats for euzicasa_ february 5 2014 12pm PST_views by Country


Stats for euzicasa_ february 5 2014 12pm_views by Country

Stats for euzicasa_ february 5 2014 12pm PST_views by Country

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: ROBERT BURNS (1759)


 

 

Robert Burns (1759)

 

 

 

Robert Burns inspired many vernacular writers ...

Robert Burns inspired many vernacular writers across the Isles with works such as Auld Lang Syne, A Red, Red Rose and Halloween. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Burns, a Scottish poet, wrote some of the best-known poems in the English language—like New Year‘s classic “Auld Lang Syne” and J.D. Salinger‘s titular inspiration “Comin’ thro’ the Rye.” However, he struggled to get published during his lifetime and became not only discouraged but poor and dissipated—carrying on several simultaneous love affairs. His first poem was published in 1786, but he did not get to enjoy his success for long; he died of rheumatic fever at 37. What is a “Burns Supper“? More… Discuss

 

 

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Vespasian Psalter at British Library (visit The British Library here)


Vespasian Psalter_ British Lybrary_25668_2

Vespasian Psalter_ British Library_25668_2 (click to access Website)

“In Anglo-Saxon EnglandJerome’s first translation of the Psalms, the Roman version, continued to be copied, and this is the earliest surviving example of it. An Old English translation was added in the ninth century above the Latin text; this addition is the oldest extant translation into English of any biblical text. This copy was made in Kent in the first half of the eighth century, perhaps at Canterbury. As in the Lindisfarne Gospels, the frame around the picture incorporates spirals of Celtic origin. On the right is the beginning of Psalm 27 (in modern numbering) with an initial D(ominus) (Lord) with an image David with Jonathan, the earliest surviving English biblical example of an initial with a narrative scene.”

Unique Musical Moments/Great Performences: The Evening Prayer – Kathleen Battle, Frederica von Stade



In the original German, with the English translation:

Abends, will ich schlafen gehn,
Vierzehn Engel um mich stehn:
Zwei zu meinen Häupten,
Zwei zu meinen Füßen,
Zwei zu meiner Rechten,
Zwei zu meiner Linken,
Zweie, die mich decken,
Zweie, die mich wecken,
Zweie, die mich weisen,
Zu Himmels-Paradeisen

Evenings, when I go to sleep,
Fourteen angels with me keep,
Two stand at my head,
Two at the foot of my bed,
Two are at my right hand,
Two are at my left hand,
Two in covers tuck me,
Two at morning wake me,
Two that point the way to rise
To heaven’s paradise.

Though maybe not quite a “Christmas” song, it’s as close to one as I can imagine! These 2 amazing perfomers are superb! We’ve Engelbert Humperdinck to thank for this unique song and melody, from “Hänsel und Gretel.” Just one of many from his brilliant opera.
Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year!!

 

Valentina Lisitsa: Gute Nacht (from Winterreise) Schubert Liszt



From Valentin: 
“As a stranger I arrived
As a stranger I shall leave”
Those are the opening words on a heartbreaking journey of gloom, grief and utter loneliness.

One of Schubert‘s friends described the day Schuber performed his newly written song cycleWinterreise” ( Winter Jorney) :
“Schubert was gloomy and depressed, and when asked the reason replied,
“Come to Schober’s today and I will play you a cycle of terrifying songs; they have affected me more than has ever been the case with any other songs.” He then, with a voice full of feeling, sang the entire Winterreise for us. We were altogether dumbfounded by the sombre mood of these songs, and Schober said that one song only, “Der Lindenbaum”, had pleased him. Thereupon Schubert leaped up and replied: “These songs please me more than all the rest, and in time they will please you as well.” 

Good Night (Wilhelm Müller)
English translation with German text below :

As a stranger I arrived
As a stranger I shall leave

I remember a perfect day in May
How bright the flowers, how cool the breeze
The maiden had a friendly smile
The mother had kind words

But now the world is dreary
With a winter path before me
I can’t choose the season
To depart from this place
I won’t delay or ponder
I must begin my journey now

The bright moon lights my path
It will guide me on my road
I see the snow-covered meadow
I see where deer have trod

A voice within says — go now
Why linger and delay?
Leave the dogs to bay at the moon
Before her father’s gate

For love is a thing of changes
God has made it so
Ever-changing from old to new
God has made it so

So love delights in changes
Good night, my love, good night
Love is a thing of changes
Good night, my love, good night

I’ll not disturb your sleep
But I’ll write over your door
A simple farewell message
Good night, my love, good night

These are the last words spoken
Soon I’ll be out of sight
A simple farewell message
Goodnight, my love, good night

Gute Nacht

Fremd bin ich eingezogen, 
Fremd zieh’ ich wieder aus.  Continue reading

Quotation: Henry James on Summer Aternoons… (beautiful words indeed-words simply transcends!)


Summer afternoon…the two most beautiful words in the English language.

Henry James (1843-1916) Discuss

Morning Has Broken: Cat Stevens


The hymn originally appeared in the second edition of Songs of Praise (published in 1931), to the tune “Bunessan“, composed in the Scottish Highlands. In Songs of Praise Discussed, the editor, Percy Dearmer, explains that as there was need for a hymn to give thanks for each day, English poet and children’s author Eleanor Farjeon had been “asked to make a poem to fit the lovely Scottish tune”. A slight variation on the original hymn, also written by Eleanor Farjeon, can be found in the form of a poem contributed to the anthology Children’s Bells, under Farjeon’s new title, “A Morning Song (For the First Day of Spring)”, published by Oxford University Press in 1957.

“Bunessan” had been found in L. McBean’s Songs and Hymns of the Gael, published in 1900.[3] Before Farjeon’s words, the tune was used as a Christmas carol, which began “Child in the manger, Infant of Mary”, translated from the Scottish Gaelic lyrics written by Mary MacDonald. The English-language Roman Catholic hymnal also uses the tune for the Charles Stanford hymns “Christ Be Beside Me” and “This Day God Gives Me”, both of which were adapted from the traditional Irish hymn St. Patrick’s Breastplate.

Writing credit for “Morning Has Broken” has occasionally been erroneously attributed to Cat Stevens, who popularised the song abroad. The familiar piano arrangement on Stevens’ recording was performed by Rick Wakeman, a classically trained keyboardist best known for his tenures in the English progressive rock band Yes.

Quotation Of The Day: Henry Fielding (1707-1754)


A good face they say, is a letter of recommendation. O Nature, Nature, why art thou so dishonest, as ever to send men with these false recommendations into the World!

Henry Fielding (1707-1754) Discuss

Stefan Augustin Doinas-Nocturna I


  Continue reading