Tag Archives: entertainment

Historic Musical Bits: Mendelssohn – A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op. 21 | The Philharmonia Orchestra Conductor: Otto Klemperer


Mendelssohn – A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op. 21

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great compositions/performances: ENRIQUE GRANADOS.- Danzas Españolas (Piano: Alicia de Larrocha)


ENRIQUE GRANADOS.- Danzas Españolas

Best Romantic Music: Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Op. 10


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Op. 10

 
 
 
 
13,062
 
 
 
 
 

 

J.S. BACH, Violin Concerto in D minor [after BWV 1052], Europa Galante


J.S. BACH, Violin Concerto in D minor [after BWV 1052], Europa Galante

great compositions/performances: Mozart – Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550


Mozart – Symphony No. 40,

in G minor, K. 550

Martha Argerich plays Schumann – Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood) Op. 15


Martha Argerich Schumann – Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood) Op. 15

historic musical bits: BEETHOVEN Cello Sonata No.2 Op.5/2 | M.Gendron, J.Françaix | 1950 *vinyl*


BEETHOVEN Cello Sonata No.2 Op.5/2 | M.Gendron, J.Françaix | 1950 *vinyl*

great compositions/performances: Annie Fischer plays Beethoven – Piano Sonata 26,Op.81a Les Adieux’ (Color-Coded Analysis)


Beethoven – Piano Sonata 26,Op.81a “Farewell” (Color-Coded Analysis)

historic musical bits: BIZET Jeux d’enfants Op.22 | Duo Kontarsky | 1982 *vinyl*


BIZET Jeux d’enfants Op.22 | Duo Kontarsky | 1982 *vinyl*

Amazing music/golden performances: Schumann Symphonic Etudes Op. 13 & Op.Posth. Valentina Lisitsa


Schumann Symphonic Etudes Op. 13 & Op.Posth. Valentina Lisitsa

Historic Musical Bits: Michelangeli Debussy Preludes Book 1


Michelangeli Debussy Preludes
Book 1

 

Haydn String Quartet Op. 76 No. 5 Jasper String Quartet ( Amazing Romantic Theme: II. Largo. Cantabile e mesto (F-sharp major)


Haydn String Quartet Op. 76 No. 5

Published on Sep 13, 2014

Performed by the Jasper String Quartet
(http://www.jasperquartet.com)
at Soka Performing Arts Center
November 24, 2013

String Quartet Op. 76 No. 5 Joseph Haydn
I. Allegretto
II. Largo. Cantabile e mesto
III. Menuetto. Allegro
IV. Finale. Presto
*************************************************

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The six String Quartets, Op. 76 by Joseph Haydn were composed in 1796 or 1797 and dedicated to the Hungariancount Joseph Georg von Erdödy[n 1] (1754–1824). They form the last complete set of string quartets that Haydn composed. At the time of the commission, Haydn was employed at the court of Prince Nicolaus Esterházy II and was composing the oratorioThe Creation as well as Princess Maria Hermenegild Esterházy’s annual mass.

Although accounts left by visitors to the Esterházy estate indicate that the quartets were completed by 1797, an exclusivity agreement meant that they were not published until 1799.[1] Correspondence between Haydn and his Viennese publishers Artaria reveal confusion as regards their release: Haydn had promised Messrs. Longman Clementi & Co. in London the first publishing rights, but a lack of communication led him to worry that their publication in Vienna might also be, unintentionally, their first appearance in full. In the event, their publication in London and Vienna was almost simultaneous.[1]

The Op. 76 quartets are among Haydn’s most ambitious chamber works, deviating more than their predecessors from standard sonata form and each emphasizing their thematic continuity through the seamless and near-continual exchange of motifs between instruments.[2]

Opus 76, No. 5 (“Largo”)

The Quartet No. 64 in D major, Op. 76, No. 5, is sometimes nicknamed Largo because the second movement with that tempo distinction dominates the quartet both in length and in character.[citation needed] The work consists of four movements:

The first movement (in D Major, 6/8 time) departs from the sonata form of the first four to what Robin Golding can only describe as “unorthodox variations”.[citation needed] The second movement, written in F-sharp major in cut time, is in sonata form. The third movement, in D major and D minor, is a standard minuet and trio, while the fourth movement’s D Major, cut time Presto is in an irregular sonata form.[6]

 

Beethoven – Piano Sonata No. 24 in F Sharp major, Op. 78 -À Thérèse- – Artur Schnabel (this sonata plays for me for more than 50 years)


Beethoven – Piano Sonata No. 24 in F Sharp major, Op. 78 -À Thérèse- – Artur Schnabel

discover beautiful music with Andras Schiff: Piano sonata op. 24, no. 78 “Fur Therese” (“Beethoven most beautiful melody”)


Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 24 in F-sharp major, Op. 78

Amazing Music /performances: Dvorak : In Nature’s Realm Overture op 91


Dvorak : In nature’s realm ouverture op 91

Amazing music/performances: Beethoven String Quartet No 2 Op 18 in G major Alban Berg Quartet


Beethoven String Quartet No 2 Op 18 in G major Alban Berg Quartet

Arturo Zeballos plays SUITE ESPAÑOLA de Gaspar Sanz


Arturo Zeballos plays SUITE ESPAÑOLA de Gaspar Sanz

Alexander Scriabin Piano Concerto f-sharp minor opus 20 – II. Andante


Alexander Scriabin Piano Concerto f-sharp minor opus 20 – II. Andante

Amazing Music/Performances: Schubert Piano Sonata No 9 in B, D575 Andras Schiff


Schubert Piano Sonata No 9 in B, D575 Andras Schiff

Historic Musical Bits: David Oistrakh – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 3 in G major, K 216


David Oistrakh – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 3 in G major, K 216

great compositions/performances: ,Claude Debussy – Nocturnes


Claude Debussy – Nocturnes

great compositions/performances: Glazunov “Symphony No 7” USSR Ministry of Culture Symphony OrchestraGennadi Rozhdestvensky


Glazunov “Symphony No 7” Gennadi Rozhdestvensky


Schumann Kinderszenen op. 15 Radu Lupu

Published on Oct 18, 2013

Robert Schumann Kinderszenen, op. 15
Radu Lupu , January 1993

Kinderszenen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

First edition title page

Kinderszenen (German pronunciation: [ˈkɪndɐˌst͡seːnən]; original spelling Kinderscenen, “Scenes from Childhood”), Opus 15, by Robert Schumann, is a set of thirteen pieces of music for piano written in 1838. In this work, Schumann provides us with his adult reminiscences of childhood. Schumann had originally written 30 movements for this work, but chose 13 for the final version.[1] Robert Polansky has discussed the unused movements.[2]

Nr. 7, Träumerei, is one of Schumann’s best known pieces; it was the title of a 1944 German biographical film on Robert Schumann.[3] Träumerei is also the opening and closing musical theme in the 1947 Hollywood film Song of Love, starring Katharine Hepburn as Clara Wieck Schumann.[4]

Schumann had originally labeled this work Leichte Stücke (Easy Pieces). Likewise, the section titles were only added after the completion of the music, and Schumann described the titles as “nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation”.[5] Timothy Taylor has discussed Schumann’s choice of titles for this work in the context of the changing situation of music in 19th century culture and economics.[6]

In 1974, Eric Sams noted that there was no known complete manuscript of Kinderszenen.[7]

Parts/Movements

  1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen (Of Foreign Lands and Peoples),  G major
  2. Curiose Geschichte (A Curious Story),  D major
  3. Hasche-Mann (Blind Man’s Buff), B minor
  4. Bittendes Kind (Pleading Child), D major
  5. Glückes genug (Quite Happy), D major
  6. Wichtige Bebebenheit (An Important Event), A major
  7. Träumerei (Dreaming), F major
  8. Am Camin (At the Fireside), F major
  9. Ritter vom Steckenpferd (Knight of the Hobby-Horse), C major
  10. Fast zu ernst (Almost too Serious), G-sharp minor
  11. Fürchtenmachen (Frightening), E minor
  12. Kind im Einschlummern (Child Falling Asleep), E minor
  13. Ffrom Der Dichter spricht (The Poet Speaks), G major

Description by Blair Johnston  (ALL MUSIC)

The 13 pieces that constitute Robert Schumann‘s Kinderszenen for piano (Scenes from Childhood), Op. 15 (1838) showcase their creator’s musical imagination at the peak of its poetic clarity. As a result, the Kinderszenen have long been staples of the repertoire as utterly charming yet substantial miniatures, the sort of compact keyboard essays in which Schumann‘s genius found full expression. Kinderszenen was one of the projects Schumann worked on during the spring of 1838 to get through a difficult period of separation from his fiancée, Clara Wieck, who was on tour as a pianist and whose father objected to the idea of her marriage to the composer. In March of that year, Schumann wrote to Clara, “I have been waiting for your letter and have in the meantime filled several books with pieces…. You once said to me that I often seemed like a child, and I suddenly got inspired and knocked off around 30 quaint little pieces…. I selected several and titled them Kinderszenen. You will enjoy them, though you will need to forget that you are a virtuoso when you play them.” The Kinderszenen are a touching tribute to the eternal, universal memories and feelings of childhood from a nostalgic adult perspective; unlike a number of Schumann‘s collections of piano character pieces (e.g. Album for the Young, Op. 68), the Kinderszenen are not intended to be played by children. Schumann claimed that the picturesque titles attached to the pieces were added as an afterthought in order to provide subtle suggestions to the player, a model Debussy followed decades later in his Preludes. Almost all of the Kinderszenen are miniature ternary (ABA) forms. Scene No. 1, “Von fremden Ländern und Menschen” (Of Foreign Lands and People), opens with a lovely melody whose basic motivic substance, by appearing in several vague guises throughout many of the other pieces, serves as a general unifying element. The seventh Scene, “Träumerei” (Reverie), is easily the most famous piece in the set; its charming melody and quieting power have recommended it to generations of concert pianists who wish to calm audiences after a long series of rousing encores. The Kinderszenen contain many delicate musical touches; Scene No. 4, “Bittendes Kind” (Pleading Child), for example, is harmonically resolved only when an unseen force (a parent?) gives in and grant the child’s wish at the beginning of No. 5, “Glückes genug” (Quite Happy). In the final piece, “Der Dichter spricht” (The Poet Speaks), Schumann removes himself just a bit from the indulgent reverie to formulate a narrator’s omniscient view of the child. Quietly, gently, the many moods and feelings that Schumann touched upon over the course of this remarkable 20-minute work are lovingly recalled, and the composition concludes, contentedly, in the same key of G major in which it began.

Great compositions/performances: ALEXANDER BORODIN – String Quartet No 2 in D major


ALEXANDER BORODIN – String Quartet No 2 in D major

Great compositions/performances: Antonin Dvorak , String Quintet No. 3, In E Flat Major, Op 97, by Dvorak Quartet, with Josef Kodousesk, viola


Henry David Thoreau — ‘A lake is a landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature. … ― Henry David Thoreau, Walden.

Antonin Dvorak,String Quintet No.3, In E Flat Major, Op 97(It is a Viola Quitet)

Antonin Dvorak, : The Wood Dove, Op. 110, B. 198 , great compositions/performances, (Fritz Lehmann · Symphony Orchestra of Radio Berlin)


The Wood Dove, Op. 110, B. 198

great compositions/performances: Schubert – String Quartet No. 13 in A minor, D. 804 (Pražák Quartet )


Schubert – String Quartet No. 13 in A minor, D. 804

great compositions/performances: Richard Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (BBC Proms 2012)


Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (Proms 2012)

greaat compositions/performances: Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)


Pepe Romero: Concierto de Aranjuez ( Joaquin Rodrigo), Recuerdos de la Alhambra ( Francisco Tarrega)

make music part of your life series: Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12


Franz Anton Rösler (Rosetti). Symphony in D major, A12

historic musical bits: Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

historic musical bits: Hamilton Harty – Carl Maria von Weber: Abu Hassan Overture


Hamilton Harty – Carl Maria von Weber: Abu Hassan Overture

make music part of your life series: Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 (“Spring”)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BS_rG_XZ0Y%5B/emebed%5D

Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 [complete] (Spring)

historic musical bits: Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20


Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20

great compositions/performances: ,Hilary Hahn – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 4 in D major, K 218


Hilary Hahn – Mozart – Violin Concerto No 4 in D major, K 218

great compositions/performances: Maurice Ravel – Sonatine pour piano: Gabriele Tomasello, piano.


Maurice Ravel – Sonatine pour piano

Music for the soul: J. S. Bach: Cantata Nº 208, ‘Sheep May Safely Graze’, BWV 208


J. S. Bach: Cantata Nº 208, ‘Sheep May Safely Graze’, BWV 208

make music part of your life: Aram Khachaturian – Lezginka from Gayane


Aram Khachaturian – Lezginka from Gayane

**********************************************************************

 

 
Khachaturian in 1971

signature written in ink in a flowing script

Aram Il’yich Khachaturian (/ˈærəm ˌkɑːəˈtʊəriən/;[1] Russian: Арам Ильич Хачатурян; Armenian: Արամ Խաչատրյան, Aram Xačatryan;[A] Armenian pronunciation: [ɑˈɾɑm χɑt͡ʃʰɑt(ə)ɾˈjɑn]; 6 June 1903 – 1 May 1978) was a Soviet Armenian composer and conductor. He is considered one of the leading Soviet composers.[2][3]

Born and raised in Tbilisi, the multicultural capital of Georgia, Khachaturian moved to Moscow in 1921 following the Sovietization of the Caucasus. Without prior music training, he enrolled in the Gnessin Musical Institute, subsequently studying at the Moscow Conservatory in the class of Nikolai Myaskovsky, among others. His first major work, the Piano Concerto (1936), popularized his name within and outside the Soviet Union. It was followed by the Violin Concerto (1940) and the Cello Concerto (1946). His other significant compositions include the Masquerade Suite (1941), the Anthem of the Armenian SSR (1944), three symphonies (1935, 1943, 1947), and around 25 film scores. Khachaturian is best known for his ballet music—Gayane (1942) and Spartacus (1954). His most popular piece, the “Sabre Dance” from Gayane, has been used extensively in popular culture and has been covered by a number of musicians worldwide.[4] His style is “characterized by colorful harmonies, captivating rhythms, virtuosity, improvisations, and sensuous melodies.”[5]

During most of his career, Khachaturian was approved by the Soviet government and held several high posts in the Union of Soviet Composers from the late 1930s, although he joined the Communist Party only in 1943. Along with Sergei Prokofiev and Dmitri Shostakovich, he was officially denounced as a “formalist” and his music dubbed “anti-people” in 1948, but was restored later that year. After 1950 he taught at the Gnessin Institute and the Moscow Conservatory, and turned to conducting. He traveled to Europe, Latin America and the United States with concerts of his own works. In 1957 Khachaturian became the Secretary of Union of Soviet Composers, a position he held until his death.

Khachaturian was the most renowned Armenian composer of the 20th century[6] and the author of the first Armenian ballet music, symphony, concerto, and film score.[B] While following the established musical traditions of Russia, he broadly used Armenian and to lesser extent, Caucasian, Eastern & Central European, and Middle Eastern peoples’ folk music in his works. He is highly regarded in Armenia, where he is considered a “national treasure”.[7]

Denunciation and restoration (1948)

 
Khachaturian in 1964

In mid-December 1947, the Department for Agitation and Propaganda (better known as Agitprop) submitted to Andrei Zhdanov, the secretary of the Communist Party’s Central Committee, a document on the “shortcomings” in the development of Soviet music. On 10–13 January 1948, a conference was held at the Kremlin in the presence of seventy musicians, composers, conductors and others who were confronted by Zhdanov:[35]

We will consider that if these comrades [Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Myaskovsky, Khachaturian, Kabalevsky and Shebalin] namely who are the principal and leading figures of the formalist direction in music. And that direction is fundamentally incorrect.

Thus, Khachaturian and other leading composers were denounced by the Communist Party as followers of the alleged formalism[10] (i.e. “[a type of] music that was considered too advanced or difficult for the masses to enjoy”)[3] and their music was dubbed “anti-people”.[36] It was the Symphonic Poem (1947), later titled the Third Symphony, that officially earned Khachaturian the wrath of the Party.[35][37] Ironically, he wrote the work as a tribute to the 30th anniversary of the October Revolution.[38] He stated: “I wanted to write the kind of composition in which the public would feel my unwritten program without an announcement. I wanted this work to express the Soviet people’s joy and pride in their great and mighty country.”[39]

Musicologist Blair Johnston believes that his “music contained few, if any, of the objectionable traits found in the music of some of his more adventuresome colleagues. In retrospect, it was most likely Khachaturian’s administrative role in the Union [of Soviet Composers], perceived by the government as a bastion of politically incorrect music, and not his music as such, which earned him a place on the black list of 1948.”[40] In March 1948,[20] Khachaturian “made a very full and humble apology for his artistic “errors” following the Zhdanov decree; his musical style, however, underwent no changes.”[40] He was sent to Armenia as a “punishment”,[10] and continued to be censured.[20] By December 1948,[20] he was “restored to favor later that year when he was praised for his film biography of Lenin”—Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (ru).[16]

historic musical bits: Schumann : Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op. 44 , Rudolf Serkin / Bush String Quartet (Rec. 1942)


Schumann : Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op. 44

great compositions/performances: Antonín Dvořák – Humoresque No. 7, Op. 101


Antonín DvořákHumoresque No. 7, Op. 101

Hector Berlioz – Waverly Overture Op.1 (1828)


 

Hector Berlioz – Waverly Overture Op.1 (1828)

 

The Nutcracker


]

The Nutcracker

The Nutcracker, a celebrated ballet by Tchaikovsky, tells the story of a young girl whose Christmas gift of a nutcracker turns into a prince and leads her to a magical land. In 1954, George Balanchine choreographed and premiered his New York City Ballet version, which was later made into a feature film. Mikhail Baryshnikov choreographed another enormously popular version for the American Ballet Theatre. What novel instrument did Tchaikovsky use in the Nutcracker score? More… Discuss
[embedhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1nzCDUNf-0[/embed]

The Nutcracker Suite (Full Album) – Tchaikovsky

Published on Oct 27, 2014

If you enjoyed this music please Like and Subscribe: http://goo.gl/LRQnxp
Purchase Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker Highlights here: http://goo.gl/Q0CWjH
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Download Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker – Complete Ballet mp3 here: http://goo.gl/IkNYcE

Song titles for Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker in order:
1. Op. 71 – 2. March 0:00
2. Op. 71 – 4. Dance 2:47
3. Op. 71 – 5. Scene & The Grandfather Dance
4. Op. 71 – 6. Scene
5. Op. 71 – 7. Scene
6. Op. 71 – 8. Scene
7. Op. 71 – 12. Arabian Dance, “Coffee”
8. Op. 71 – 13. Waltz Of The Flowers
9. Op. 71 – 14. Pas De Deux
10. Op. 71 – 15. Closing Waltz & Grand Finale

historic musical bits: Sviatoslav Richter – Chopin – Andante spianato et grande polonaise brillante in E-flat major, Op 22


Sviatoslav Richter – Chopin – Andante spianato et grande polonaise brillante in E-flat major, Op 22

historic musical bits: Beethoven – String Quartet No.5 in A major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


 

Beethoven – String Quartet No.5 in A major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952

 

Mozart – Symphony No. 38 in D, K. 504 (Prague)


 

Mozart – Symphony No. 38 in D, K. 504  (Prague)

 

make music part of your life series: Krystian Zimerman plays Valses Nobles et Sentimentales (Maurice Ravel)


Krystian Zimerman plays Valses Nobles et Sentimentales (Maurice Ravel) – Complete

 

Historic Musical Bits: , Mendelssohn:, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Berliner Philharmoniker conductor: Ferenc Fricsay) Rita Streich & Diana Eustrati (1950)


Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Ferenc Fricsay) Rita Streich & Diana Eustrati

 

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

great compositions/performances: Evgeny Kissin – Schumann-Liszt – Widmung (Liebeslied)



Evgeny Kissin – Schumann-Liszt – Widmung (Liebeslied)

Historic musical bits: Richard Strauss: Death and Transfiguration, Op. 24, (Orchestra Sinfonica di Torino della Rai Conductor Sergiu Celibidache (1970)



Death and Transfiguration (Tod und Verklärung, Op. 24) : Richard Strauss